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NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, Inc 

GENERAL LIE 
10 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, N, Y 



I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor142739spon 









4 JULY I960 
40« a copy • $8 * y«*T 



SPO 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



' 



NBC GENERAL 



KBW 



FIRST IN BUFFALO 




and PULSE AGREES 

WKBW is No. f 



XJ AVERAGE SHARE 

/Oof the audience 



April 1960 PULSE (Buffalo) Mon-Sun 6:00 A. M.-12:00 MIDNIGHT 



WILL NEW LOW 
COSTS SPUR 
DAY NET TV? 

'Rock bottom' program 
prices and new shows 
provide stable sales 
base for the networks 

Page 29 



A second look 
at those tv 
'spot carriers' 

Page 32 

How Sacramento 
sells taste 
with sound 

Page 34 

Howard Abrahams: 
TVs retail 
missionary man 

Page 42 



WKBW — BUFFALO — 1520 
50,000 WATTS • Clear Channel 



Represented by 
AVERY-KNODEL 



\ 



The amazing transistor. . . no larger than a match 
head, yet opening up electronic miracles 
never before dreamed possible. So minute, 
so exacting, it truly takes a quality touch to 
devise such an engineering masterpiece. 

The quality measure of today's better radio 
and television stations requires no 
microscopic examination ... it can be felt, not 
only through audience reaction, but in 
advertiser product association. 



I 



THE 



quality 



TOUCH 



Transistor made by TEXAS INSTRUMENTS INC., D 




TELEVISION 

RADIO obc/nbc • DALLAS 



'z*^&* 



Serv.ng the greater 
BROADCAST SERVICES 



LAS-FOR 
THE DALI 




Cleopatra made things happen on the Nile . . . and 




WPEN 

RADIO 
MAKES 
THIN6S 
HAPPEN 
IN 
PHILADELPHIA 

WPEN is the only station in Philadelphia 
broadcasting Signal 95 — exciting on-the- 
spot tape recordings of traffic violators by 
police officers who are wired for sound. 
The actual conversations . . . the actual 
excuses... the actual arguments! 
In Public Interest. .In Sales. .And In 
Exciting Listening WPEN Makes Things 
Happen In Philadelphia. 

WPEN 

Represented nationally by GILL-PERNA 



CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS 

WPEN. Philadelphia . . . WSAI, Cincinnati . . . WALT, Tempo 



MORE 



for yo° r 
dollars 




Nashville's 



WSIXTV 

Your BEST BUY 
On Cost Per 1,000 



• MAXIMUM TOWER HEIGHT 

above sea level . . . none 
• -H-Hited in this oreo by CAA. 

• MAXIMUM POWER 

316.000 powerful wotts . . . 
.m — permitted by FCC. 

• MAXIMUM EFFICIENCY 

coveroge and low cost per 
i mate WSIXTV your most 
buy m the rich Middle Tennes- 
see. Southern Kentucky, Northern Ala- 
bama TVA area. 



CHECK THESE 



FACTS: 



TV HOMES- 370 700 
Populot.on - 1 965 500 




© Vol. 14, No. 27 • 4 JULY I960 

SPONSOR 

TMI WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS UH 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 



Will new low costs trigger day tv interest? 

I ... 6rs1 time in <la\ television net history, there's a slow move from 
:i liu\cr'~ to a seller's market as pricing, programing are revamped 

A second look at those net 'spot carriers' 

No* that next fall's night tv line-ups are about firmed, many of the 
industry people art- wondering about the 18 participation-type shows 

How to sell taste with sound 

34 Sacramento tomato juice stays on top in New York with all-radio cam- 
paign based on sound when poured; 1st quarter 21% above last year 

New York buyers take over the town 

36 More 'ban 300 agency media executives take part in Crown Stations' 
[Yeas ire Hunt. » ool New York for hidden clues leading to 25 top prizes 

New Air Media Basics: watch for it 

38 SPONSOR'S 14th annual fact book on radio/tv, scheduled for publication 
late in July, will feature, among other things, list of U.S. timebuyers 

Howard Abrahams: TvB's retail man 
42 Tv wasn't even on the scene when he entered retailing over 30 years 
ago. Today he sells the medium which bills $280 million from Main St. 

Nighttime nears sellout on Columbia radio 

44 South Carolina station WMSC is fast approaching 100% mark in time sold 
during 7 p.m. to midnight hours, seven days a week. Here's how it's done 

Network tv's 'qualitative' picture 

45 Trenda audience figures summarize program selectivity, frequency of 

viewing, sponsor identification. Also, Convention schedule, comparagraph 



FEATURES 

12 ( ommercial Commentary 

56 Film - 

24 I9i h and Madison 

60 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 \.-w -maker of the Week 

60 Picture Wrap-Up 

16 Reps at Work 

68 Seller's Viewpoint 



52 Sponsor Asks 

58 Sponsor Hears 

19 Sponsor-Scope 

70 Sponsor Speaks 

26 Spot Buys 

70 Ten-Second Spots 

66 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

5 5 Washington Week 



fn^l 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation ana 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. <49 6 Madison) New York 17. N. Y. Telephone: Murray 
Hill 8-2772 Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Birminfhi*. 
Office: 36)7 8th Ave. South Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a 
year. Other Foreign countries S11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address 
all correspondence tn 40 E. 49th St.. N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 

• 1960 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



EVERLASTINGLY AT IT! 

Serve or sink! Things are just that simple in any 
competitive television market. At WHO-TV we stay 
everlastingly at the job of serving. 

There are more than 270,000 television homes in the 
area served by WHO-TV (see chart below). WHO-TV 
spares no effort or money to bring this big audience the 
very finest programming and talent. Our studios are 
equipped with the finest production and transmission 
equipment available. Our film library* is stocked to the 
"teeth" with award-winning properties. 

And WHO-TV has a steadily growing audience. For 
example, NSI shows WHO-TV's "Early Show" (4 p.m.- 
6:05 p.m.) delivered 12,680 more viewers per quarter 
hour in February, I960 than in November, 1959. 

Ask PGW for the details on WHO-TV and the 
growing Central Iowa television market. 



*MGM Package * WARNER BROTHERS "Vanguard" 
if "Showcase Package" if NTA "Dream," "Champagne," 
"Lion" it SCREEN GEMS "Sweet 65" • HOLLYWOOD 
TELEVISION SERVICE "Constellation" * Al and A ALEX- 
ANDER "Imperial Prestige" * PARAMOUNT LIBRARY 
and others. 





t 
Population 


Net 
Income 
($000) 


Retail 
Sales 

($000) 


Food 
($000) 


Auto- 
motive 
($000) 


Drugs 
($000) 


WHO-TV 

COVERAGE 

AREA 


1,227,400 


$2,094,294 


$1,540,375 


$325,412 


$269,757 


$43,823 


IOWA 


2,747,300 


4,696,007 


3,464,099 


717,261 


596,958 


99,774 


WHO-TV 
PERCENT 
OF TOTAL 


44% 


44% 


45% 


45% 


47% 


43% 



WHO-TV is part of 

Central Broadcasting Company, 

which also owns and operates 

WHO Radio, Des Moines 

WOC-TV, Davenport 



WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHQcTV 




WHO-TV 

Channel 13 • Des Moines 

NBC Affiliate 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

Robert H. Harter, Sales Manager 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., National Representalu 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



wmca 



PRO. ril-IZ: ! 





■ It was summer in Kansas City, 
Kansas, and the vear was 1949. Ruth 
Meyer, ace sports reporter for the home 
town weekl\ was in love with an out- 
fielder on the k. C. Blues and everything 
looked just fine until Floyd got fired. Dis- 
enchanted with a guy who couldn't get to 
first base. Ruth gave back the ring, 
turned in her press pass and joined local 
K.C KN as script writer, music picker and 
copy chiet. The outfield's loss was radio's 
gain for in 1954. Ruth Meyer was ap- 
pointed continuity and promotional di- 
sunion W'HB in Kansas 

' nouri. And in 1958, not quite as 
wide-eyed as fiction would have it. Ruth 
arrived in New York and set up shop at 
WMGM. It onl\ took three months for 

\ ind RM to meet and fall head 
over heels and the marriage has lasted. 
Still able to define the infield By rule in 
twenty-five words. Ruth Meyer is pos- 
sibly the most athletic Production Direc- 
tor in town, suitch hitting on music- 
programming and on-air promotion. 



AM Radio Sale 



Jack Masia & Co., Ii 



wmca 



rpi 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



The J. Walter Thompson tradition of daring in neic media 
combined icith a quiet conservatism of tone will be carried 
on by Gorman H. Strouse. the agency's neic chief executive 
officer. Strouse succeeds Stanley Resor. ivho relinquishes ac- 
tive leadership of the agency after some 44 years as its head. 



The newsmaker: Norman H. Strouse joined J. Walter 
Thompson in the late 1920"s. became president of the agency in 1955 
when Stanley Resor relinquished that post, and now becomes J. 
Walter Thompsons chief executive officer. 

Resor chose Strouse as his successor, and the descent of agency- 
headship from one man to the other reflects a continuity of ideas 
about and attitudes toward advertising. 

Those who recall Resors willingness to go fully into new media — 
lele\ ision. before that radio, and 
even earlier, women's magazines — 
will realize that courage was never 
lacking in J. Walter Thompson's 
leadership no matter how conser- 
vative its voice and manner have 
been. 

Strouse. as a claimant to the 
JW'i throne in recent years, was 
not identified w ith am New \ ork 
dynasty. To the contrary, he ruse 
in the agency in the Pacific and in 
Detroit. After joining the agency 
in the later 1920"s in San Fran- 
i isco, In- rose to become assistant Pacific Coast 
war intervened in 1942. 

After the war. Strouse became account executive for F< rd. was 
elected a v. p. in 1947. and became a director of the agency and De- 
troit office manager in 1949. Six vears later the presidencv of the 
agenc] was his too. when Resor decided to give it up. 

J he durability of Resor's leadership of the agencv is. of course, 
remarkable. In 1908, some 52 years ago. he joined the agency in 
Cincinnati. Then in 1916. James Walter Thompson, the founder, sold 
the agenc] to Resor and Charles Raymond, who retired shortly after- 
ward-. Resor, who is now 81. was connected with the agencv for two 
decades before Strouse. now 53, joined the agencv in 1929. 

rhe stock held by Resor will now be acquired bv the J. Walter 
rhompson profit-sharing trust. The agency's long-standing policy is 
that onl) active personnel in the company should hold its stock. 
Resor will continue on as chairman of the agency, and first vice-chair- 
men Henr) I . Flower, Jr.. and Samuel W. Meek, will also retain 
their posts. ^ 



€""4 



i H. Strouse 
anaser when the 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY I960 



NEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 

WTIX appoints EASTMAN 



In 1803 Thomas Jefferson made history 
with the "LOUISIANA PURCHASE"... 

Now YOU can make sales history with the 
modern "LOUISIANA PURCHASE" 

WTIX 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



POWER: 5000 watts on 690 kc 

PULSE: #1 IN 39 OF 48-'A HOURS ["V^eo™ 

PROVEN SALES RESULTS 



See your EAST/man 
for details 



WTIX— THE STORZ STATION 




robert e. eastman & co., mo. 



representing major radio stations 

NEW YORK: CHICAGO: SAN FRANCISCO: DALLAS: ST. LOUIS: LOS ANGELES: 

527 Madison Avenue 333 N. Michigan Ave. Russ Bldg. 211 North Ervay Bldg. Syndicate Trust Bldg. Taft Building 

New York 22, N.Y. Chicago, Illinois San Francisco, Cal. Dallas, Texas 915 Olive St. _ 1680 N. Vine St. 

PLaza 9-7760 Financial 6-7640 YUkon 2-9760 Riverside 7-2417 St. Louis Missouri Hollywood Cal 

CEntral 1-6055 Hollywood 4-7276 



DETROIT: 

Book Building 
Detroit, Mich. 
WOodward 5-5457 



In Roanoke in '60 
the Selling Signal 

is Seven... 



Wig-wagging will get you 
nowhere, but your selling message 
on WDBJTV will go info over 
400,000 homes in Virginia, N. 
Carolina and W. Va. . . . a rich 
and growing Television Market of 
arly 2,000,000 people. 

You can sell like sixty on seven. 
In Roanoke, seven is WDBJ-TV . . . 
best in sight, day or night, for higher 
ratings at lower cost. Your only 
station in this area offering CBS 
network shows — plus superior local 
programming, plus hard-hitting 
merchandising assistance. 




NO, THIS 15 "KNOE-LAND 



embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, Soi 
West M.iiuiippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 
Population Drug Sales 
Houaeholdi BOO Automotive Sale* 
Sj ndabli h,,, mm.- General Merchand 
69.000 Total Retail Sales 


th 


Arkansas, 

$ 40,355,000 
S 299,539,000 
S 148.789,000 


KNOE TV AVERAGES 79.1 


°0 


SHARE OF AUDIENCE 


Accord, ng to March 1960 ARB wc a 
9 a m to m.dn.ght, 7 days a week. 


•xrage 79.1 °o share 


of 


audience from 



KNOE-TV 



CBS • ABC 

A James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 






SPONSOR 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 



Senior Editore 

Jane Pinlterton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 



Associate Editors 

Joel Lindrup 

Gloria F. Pilot 

Ben Seff 

Lloyd Kaplan 

Walter F. Scanlon 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 



Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 
Editorial Research 

Helene Etelson 
Barbara Parkinson 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

Arthur E. Breider 



Eastern Office 

Willard Dougherty 
Southern Manager 



Western Manage 

George Dietrich 



CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Benjamin Waldeck, Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Massimino. Assistant to Publisher 
Laura Oken. Accounting Manager 
George Becker; Anne Marie Cooper; 
Michael Crocco: Syd Guttman; Wilke 
Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Dorothy Tinker; 
Flora Tomadelli 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 




IN INLAND CALIFORNIA (and western nevadai 

BEELINE **°-° 





Nen? dining hall, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 



You're really in the money when you 
talk to Nevadans and Californians via 
Beeline radio. For example, around the 
metropolitan Reno area — home base 
of KOH — total retail sales exceed 
those in the metropolitan Galveston 
(Texas) area and the metropolitan Al- 
toona (Pa.) area, both with larger pop- 
ulations.* 

Reno is the educational, financial, 
manufacturing, distribution, medical 
and transportation center of most of 



Northern and Central Nevada, North- 
eastern California and Southern Oregon. 

The most effective way to beam your 
radio message into the thriving Reno 
market is on KOH, The Beeline station 
in Reno. 

As a group, Beeline stations give you 
more radio homes than any combination 
of competitive stations ... at by far 
the lowest cost per thousand. (Nielsen 
& SR&D) 
'Sales Management's 1959 Survey of Buying Power 




/lAcCtotcluf &faadc*MMq Co*«f>aAuf 

ctroAUFMTn r a i i f n p m I a 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
PAUL H. RAYMER CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



4 JULY 1960 



® 



Statistics are like icebergs. The numbers you see may 
l>e impressive, but it is often the footnote hidden below 
that carries the most weight. 

• r the next network trade ad you see. Examine 
•■ figures that support the headline's claim. 

I on less than half of all the nation's 

do they represent a true measure 

of nationwide audiences? (Wecount the whole country— 

- simply reflect an isolated week or 



two, or do they span a longer, more meaningful period? 
(We embrace the whole season— see footnote.) 

Do the numbers in big type report "total audience" 
ratings, which include all viewers who dip in and out ol 
any program? Or are they "average-minute audiences."' 
which more accurately measure how many television 
homes were tuned to your commercials? (Our viewers 
stay put— see footnote.) 

Do the boundaries of "nighttime and daytime" in- 
clude the full schedule of sponsored programs, or are 



NATIONWIDE NTI AA REP 
NIGHT:M0N-SUN6-11PI 



some time periods left out, foreshortening either night . . . more of the most popu lar ni ghttime prog rams than 

fep day? (We work the longest hours— see footnote.) the other two networks combined : 4 of the top 5, 6 of 

When you do look into our footnotes, you will find the top 10, and 11 of the top 20 

that by all the measures that really count the CBS .. .moreof the most popular daytime program s than th e 

Television Network again this season broadcast the other two networks combined : 3 of the top 5, 7 of the top 

most popular program schedule in all television, with 10, and 12 of the top 20 

...the g reat est nighttime audi ences : 16% larger than Which explains why advertisers, who can be counted 

the second network and 17% larger than the third on to read the fine print, continued to commit more of 

. . . the lar gest daytime audiences: 20% larger than the their budgets to the CBS Television Network than to 

second network and 65' ! larger than the third any other single advertising medium. 

lTS0CTI/59-MAYIi;60 
:DAY:M0N-FRI7AM-6PM 



man, that WSUN RADIO 
is strictly from 
SQUARESVILLE! 



^ 



hi foi me it ■ 

! [let there'i i 

red iwingto', m reamin' 

.,..-..! thei 
- .in.l .ill 

thai om,| •. And the 

mush doesn't come on 
\sith .1 . r.ivli .mil n-.ilK rock 
you. I mean, Dad, U you 
want t<> 1»- ifaook . . . like 
i. ..IK rattled , . . don't 
listen to 

RADIO 
62 



WSUN 




BUT . . . 

If you want to reach the solid, 

I mean the really solid, like 

buyers . . . 

"SUNNY" is the 

S ADULT 
WESTERN 
STATION* 



tfs«v 



'-*\ $ 




LIKE 

WEST FLORIDA, 



0. 1 in adult listener- 
dp 21 hours ,. dayl And 

WSUN delivers you the 
s i Petersburg 

Market al the lowest cost 

pet thousand adult 



620 KC 




Noll. R.p VENARO. RINTOUl & McCONNELl 
S E R.p: JAMES 5. AYERS 




by John E. McMillin 




Commercial 
commentary 



The $22 Billion Challenge 

Last week, at the Yacht Lounge of the Barbi- 
zon-Plaza a New York rooftop with a fine "on- 
a-clear-day-) ou-can-see-the-Catskills" vista — the 
Television Bureau of Advertising threw a small 
hut. to me, highly thought-provoking luncheon. 

The meeting itself was a kind of view-from- 
the-mountaintop affair and centered on TvB's 
plans for expanding retail tv advertising. 

Howard Abrahams, the Bureau's savvy retailing chief, outlined the 
TvB programs that are being built to capture more department and 
specialty store dollars. (See page 42.) 

President Norman (Pete) Cash explained the business and eco- 
nomic forecasts (mainly McCann-Erickson Marplan projections) on 
which TvB is basing its grand strategy for the '60's. 

According to Pete, the total volume of American advertising is 
expected to rise from the $11 billion level of 1959 to S22 billion 
by 1970. 

Of this, national advertising will account for $12 billion and retail, 
which the experts expect to increase at an even faster rate, will hit 
S10 billion. 

TvB has set its total national and local target at $5 billion of tv 
advertising by 1970 (S3 billion by 1965) or better than a 300% 
increase over 1959 in the next 10 years. The Abrahams' plans for 
retail and TvB's other plans for national are focused on these goals. 

All in all it was an impressive explanation and left me more than 
ever convinced that, in the TvB and RAB, broadcasting has two of 
the hottest, most aggressive sales development organizations which 
an) industry has ever known. 

But — and this is what bothers me — I wonder if other sections of 
our business aren't dragging their duffs behind these two hard-hitting 
sales teams? 

Our real dreamers and visionaries 

Specifically, I wonder why no one in the industry has dared to 
set radio and tv programing goals for 1970 which are comparable 
\sith these exalted sales objectives? 

Think about it for a minute. 

Can you remember, in the past 12 months, a single industry- 
leader who has suggested that radio/tv programs should be at least 
300% better by 1970? 

Can you recall any constructive plan designed to make program- 
ing three times as interesting, three times as entertaining, three times 
aa important and valuable in the next 10 years? 

I can't. And yet, since programing is the heart of our business, 
wh\ shouldn't we have this? Why should we expect to triple our 
share of a $22 billion kitty without tripling our contributions? 
{Please turn to page 14) 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



M&mo- ta AdaesitUesU: 




According to preliminary 1960 Census Bureau figures, just released, the combined 
populations of 18 states and the District of Columbia 



• ••• 

• CHANNEL % 



Alaska 


Maine 


North Dakota 


Arizona 


Montana 


Rhode Island 


Colorado 


Nebraska 


South Dakota 


Delaware 


Nevada 


Utah 


Hawaii 


New Hampshire 


Vermont 


Idaho 


New Mexico 


Wyoming 



total 15,000,000 persons- 
equal to the total number of persons in Metropolitan New York's 17 counties, prime cov- 
erage area of WABC -TV, Channel 7. 

FACT: Since 1950, the total population of these 18 states and the District of 

Columbia has increased 19%. 
FACT: Since 1950, the Metropolitan New York television market has increased 

300%. 
FACT: Since 1950, WABC-TV's average audience has increased 822%. 

FACT: And, according to a special analysis, prepared by A. C. Nielsen (Feb. 1960), 

one WABC-TV advertiser's campaign of nine spots a week, nighttime only, 

reached 98.9% of the television families in this area within a four-week 

period and reached them an average of 7.1 times. 

WABC-TV matches this booming market by growing faster every day. . . not only during 

the past ten years. . . but right at this moment. And now watch what happens this fall 

when Channel 7 continues the powerful programming of "The Untouchables," "77 

Sunset Strip," "Hawaiian Eye," "Alcoa Presents," "The Rifleman," "The Detectives" 

and "The Real McCoys"— with the addition of such exciting shows as "Hong Kong," 

NCAA Football and American Football League, "The Naked City," "Winston Churchill's 

Memoirs," "Surfside 6," "Saturday Night Fights" and "The Flintstones," among others. 

So, iff you. loa+it yauA. pAoduoU cofUUUf. tUode counted — a+td 
ca*mt U *Q — tUe UAmb U clea*. 

WABC-TV CHANNEL 7 

Flagship Station Q ABC Television Network 

THE MOST ENJOYABLE SIGHT IN TOWN 



• 4 july 1960 









- 



Commercial commentary {Cm 




° 



BONDS COVERAGE 



Brattleboro,vt. 

GRCTNFiap.MASS., KEENE.N.H. 

+ G P MOlUNGBtRV MAS DETAILS 



Sometimes I think that the only real visionaries in our business 
.nt the scientists, and salesmen, and financial experts. 

Our scientists dream dreams, as General Sarnoff disclosed in his 
RTES speech tasl spring. His talk about the future of color, panel- 
lliin receivers, 'round the world tv, and an increase in broadcast 
channels was an expression of pure scientific idealism. 

Our salesmen and marketing experts set seemingly impossible 
goals and fight their hearts out to achieve them. 

Hut what the heck has happened to our programing people and to 
the concern of broadcast management with programing? At the 
\ \l! ( onvention in Chicago last April, not a single important session 
was devoted to the all-important subject of programing. And I 
\\ < > i n 1 » - 1 if this is right. 

Let's not sit on our status quo 

I certainly don't agree with the doom and gloom prophecies of 
such critics as John Crosby and, more recently George Rosen of 
/ ariet?) . 

I don't believe the industry is going to hell in a handbasket or 
I hat | >a\ tv will eventually steamroller us into oblivion. 

But I do think that the events of the past year have tended to 
throw all of us on the defensive about radio/tv programing. 

Faced with a stabbing need to justify what we're now doing, we've 
fallen into some stodgy status quo thinking, about programs, which 
we wouldn't tolerate in any other phase of our industry. 

All of us are proud of tv's explosion into a SI 1 /-? billion business in 
just 13 years. But we'd cut the throat of any pessimist who suggested 
that SI 1 /, billion represents the limit of our sales potential. 

All of us can be proud of the industry's many great programing 
accomplishments. But none of us, in our right minds, think that 
radio and tv have yet reached more than a fraction of our program 
potentials. And I'm speaking here not of public service or highbrow 
fare, but of the standard elements — drama, music, comedy, personal- 
its, news, controversy, and panel shows. 

How can we get better programs by 1970? 

The job is not one for outsiders — for eggheads or soreheads or 
do-gooders or long hairs or solemn committees of earnest public- 
spirited citizens. It belongs to us. 

Most of the men who will be ruling the destinies of radio and tv in 
1970 are in the industry today. 

Most of them, I suspect, are now in their middle or late 30's. Most 
arc working right now at networks or stations around the country. 

Those who have real leadership potentials are already mature and 
experienced enough to understand the complexities and realities of 
operating a mass medium. 

None are yet too old, too tired, too jaded or too cynical to feel the 
excitement and the challenge which our industry provides. 

I think it's about time we began hearing from some of these young 
lions about their programing ideas. 

As I understand the TvB and McCann economic predictions, 
there'll be a lot of money available for advertising in the next 
decade. But radio and tv will be fighting, with programs, for the 
attention of a far better educated, far more spohisticated population 
than we have today. And we'll be facing far tougher competition. 

How about it kids'.' What'll you do for us tomorrow? ^ 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



WNAX 

FARM SERVICE 

PERSONNEL 






WNAX-570 TO SPONSOR 1960 
NATIONAL PLOWING CONTEST 



WNAX, in co-operation with the Sioux Falls Cham- 
ber of Commerce and the South Dakota Association 
of Soil Conservation Districts, will sponsor the 1960 



onservation Field 


Davs and National Plowing 


-t beuinning Septt 


mber 21st. 


100.000 people ar 


E expected to visit the con- 


te during the thr 


•e day- of this big national 



Alreadv farm machinery and farm-related product 
manufacturers have contracted for the major portion 
of the available commercial exhibit area. In addition 
to these commercial exhibits, visitors will sec soil 
conservation developments and demonstrations, and 
the National Plowing Contest with top plow men 
from all over the United States competing. 

Invitations have been extended to the Republican 



and Democratic presidential candidates to attend. 
In 1952 and 1956 both presidential candidates made 
major campaign speeches at the National Plowing 
Contests. 

Active in ihe planning of the event are the members 
of ihe WNAX three-man Farm Service Department: 
Rex Messersmith. George B. German and Lyle Han- 
sen. This trio of farm experts travel the length and 
breadth of Big Aggie Land for first hand information 
of interest and benefit to the Midwest Fanner. 
WNA\-570's sponsorship of this national farm event 
is one more indication of the station's leadership 
in farm broadcasting and service in Big Aggie Land 
—the nation's 40th Radio Market. 
To reach and sell this important fi\ estate area — 
you need only WNAX-570. 



9 



WNAX-570 CBS RADIO 

PROGRAMMING FOR ADULTS OF ALL AGES 



PEOPLES BROADCASTING CORPORATION 
Sioux City, Iowa Yankton, South Dakota 

Represented by Katz 




PEOPLES BROADCASTING 

CORPORATION 
WNAX, Yankton, S.D. 
KVTV, Sioux City 
WGAR, Cleveland. Ohi. 
WRFD, Columbus, Oh.o 
WTTM, Trenton, N.J. 
WMMN, Fairmont v-.'.V 



YOU 
KCANT 
KCOVER 

TEXAS 

without 



KCEN-TV 




WATTS UP, DOC? 

We're the only maximum 
power 100,000 watter in 
in the Waco-Temple 
market! (And our antenna 
is 833 feet up !) 

HI , 

CHANNEL ^^7 



LAIR '"IVIllPk A5SOCIATKS 




Reps at work 




Chuck Standard, v.p.. The Meeker Co., New York, feels the SPONSOR 
Standard Spot Practices Committee proposal for a new standardized 
billing form for radio tv spot deserves rapid approval from all sta- 
tions. "No alert, progressive radio or tv station manager should 
overlook the importance of this form because what is good for the 
industry will be, at least in a ^^bbbbb^bbh^b^^bb^^^^b 
small way. good for him. I would 
like to thank SPONSOR magazine 
for its leadership in attacking one 
of broadcasting's greatest prob- 
lems^ — paper work. This standard- 
ized billing form will save count- 
less hours of needless paper work, 
uncalled for arguments, unneces- 
sary correspondence, and delay of 
payment to the stations." But 
Standard cautions that the battle 
of the billing form is not yet won. 
"Even though it was recommended and endorsed by the Station 
Representatives Assn., Television Bureau of Advertising, Radio Bu- 
reau of Advertising, Assn. of National Advertisers, American Assn. 
of Advertising Agencies, etc., it cannot do the job until the sta- 
tions adopt it. More efficient buying and selling awaits their o.k." 



Jack King, radio manager, Peters, Griffin, Woodward i Boston i , 
find- his greatest challenge in selling ideas. "The fullest realiza- 
tion of spot radio's productivity for the advertiser comes through 
the combined ingenuities of creative selling and creative buying. 
The rep who is ready and able to work directly with creative agency 
people finds them receptive. He s 
frequently asked to give advice on 
how best to use spot radio. 
Through his station knowledge and 
experience with a broad range of 
successful radio campaigns he can 
demonstrate what's been done well. 
He can suggest how best to har- 
ness a campaign to programing 
and talent. Special time-signal 
packages, weather and other sea- 
sonal tie-ins, boating and fishing 
reports, can all be designed to 
match the advertiser's goals. The music on a commercial e.t. can 
even be designed to mesh with a particular segment of programing." 
As King ■ i - ii. • \ll of this is possible when the rep*s inside knowl- 
edge of his stations and markets is matched with a firm grounding 
in advertiser noals. The l»g idea 1 never ha- been more in demand." 




4 july 1960 



HOW TO PLAY 

'Take TAE and See' 

It's simple. It's fun. Ask your Katz man for your free "Blindfold Kit," complete 
with blindfold, pen, comparative "homes reached" and rates of the three Pitts- 
burgh TV stations. Then follow simple instructions and let your secretary prove to 
you— blindfolded— that in Pittsburgh, you'll reach more homes per dollar during 
peak viewing hours when you take TAE. 



wTae 

SiUKH 

4 



wh^^Lih nm 




ABC TELEVISION 
REPRESENTED BY 





California National Productions proudly an- 
nounces its new adventure series, "The Blue 
Angels." Here, close-up, are human -interest 
stories of the U. S. Navy's famous precision- 
flying team. The series' sharpest focus is on 
the men themselves, their pleasures and prob- 
lems—the kind that are within everyone's 
experience. The Blue Angels are the men who 
man the Navy's Tiger Jets, the men who work 
in the clouds at 600- miles-an -hour and up 
. . . then come down to earth to face situ- 
ations just as dramatic as those in the air. 

Matching courage, skill and team spirit against 
incredible aerial duties, the Navy's Blue An- 
gels have thrilled 35,000,000 Americans with 
their breathtaking feats. And millions more in 
every part of the country will see them fly 
in the next 12 months in 75 scheduled dem- 
onstrations that are promotion "naturals." 

Hard-hitting realism characterizes this entire 
series. The Blue Angels' former skipper, Com- 
mander "Zeke" Cormier, USN, as technical 
advisor for all shooting, ensures program 
authenticity. Sam Gallu, creator- producer of 
the successful "Navy Log," is in charge of 
capturing all the excitement on film. The Navy 
Department has pledged "full cooperation." 

Continental Oil Company (CONOCO) has already 
purchased "The Blue Angels" for its market- 
ing area. Now is the time to put this powerful 
series of warm, inspiring, hu- 
man dramas to work for you. 

NBC TELEVISION FILMS. A DIVISION OF 
CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS ' 




r a, 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy reader* 



SPONSOR -SCOPE 



4 July I960 

Coovrlght 1*80 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Scan the first six months of 1960 for events (outside the Washington probes) 
which made a particular dent on the commercial side of tv and radio and you'll probably 
single out these three : 

1 ) The tv network's introduction of a discount plan to induce advertisers to 
come in for the summer. (Agency reaction: a better plan would have been to make it 
more conductive for advertisers already on to stay through the summer.) 

2) The galloping extension of the spot carriers, which the largest agencies saw 
as the handwriting on the wall as far as network program control is concerned — the time be- 
ing not far off when the sponsor will have been pushed virtually altogether out of the control 
tent. 

3) The explosion from buying sources over dual rate practices prevailing among 
radio stations for national advertisers. (See page 35, 13 June issue for detailed report.) 



National spot radio has lots of pre-Fourth excitement all its own: order, renewals 
and calls for avails came shooting at reps from many agency directions. 

Included in the activity: Lincoln-Mercury's Comet (K&E) ; Ford institutional (K&E) ; 
Instant Jell-0 pudding (Y&R), for 16 weeks, starting 11 July; Mrs. Filbert's margarine (Y&R) ; 
Maxwell House Coffee's Western Blend (Ogilvy, B&M) ; Eskimo Pie (Richard E. Byrd) ; Ford 
Dealers (JWT). 

Renewals included: Florists Telegraph Delivery (KM&J) ; Mr. Clean (Tatham-Laird) ; 
Northwest Airlines ( Campbell-Mi thun). 

Alberto-Culver (Wade), which has become an important NBC TV customer, is stay- 
ing with spot tv for the summer, after all. 

The product: Treseme, its new hair coloring. The move could trigger Clairol and Helena 
Rubenstein also moving quickly into spot tv. 



Both New York and Chicago are steadily losing out on their vast margins as 
sources of national spot billings. The shaving process started a couple years ago. 

The main reason for the dwingling edges : reps keep adding more and more branch 

offices, especially in the midwest, instead of travel-servicing the accounts. 

Note in the following comparative percentage breakdown of billing shares, as compiled 
by the Station Representatives Association, what's happened particularly to St. Louis: 



TV 



Radi< 



SOURCE 


1960 


1959 


1960 


1959 


New York 


62.5 


63.3 


59.0 


57.2 


Chicago 


18.5 


19.8 


18.0 


20.7 


Los Angeles 


3.5 


3.6 


3.4 


6.5 


San Francisco 


4.8 


3.4 


3.4 


6.1 


Detroit 


1.6 


1.2 


5.8 


2.8 


St. Louis 


2.8 


1.7 


3.5 


1.7 


Atlanta 


1.7 


2.5 


3.0 


1.4 


Dallas-Ft. W. 


1.2 


0.3 


1.3 


0.5 


Boston 


1.3 


1.0 


0.4 


0.3 


Philadelphia 


1.0 


1.3 


1.0 


1.4 


Others 


2.1 


1.8 


1.2 


1.4 


TOTAL 


100,0% 


mo.cr; 


ioo.o r ; 


100.0% 


4 july 1960 








19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



In a week that is supposed to be the doldrums for that medium, new spot tv business 
. rackled >* it H action. 

1 he baying and call* for availablities were heavy in both New York and Chicago. 
M W YOBK* PAG's Crisco, Duncan Hines, Gleem and Ivory bar i Compton ) : Breck 
h. McClinton) : American Home's Primitine remedy for hay fever, etc. 
Little Ladies toiletries i Gumbinner i : a new fizz product out of Charles W. Hoyt: 
ge of minutes hv Carter's Arrid (SSC&B), whose starting date had been postponed. 
« llll \(,<>: Kellogg i Burnett* in about 100 markets for All Stars 'new cereal i intro- 
duction; Pillsbury cake mixes Burnett*. 10 markets. 39 weeks: Mr. Clean (Tatham- 
Laird), northeastern states: Wheaties < Campbell-Mithun i . 2t weeks, northwest areas. 



Yon mav have forgotten, but American Airlines (Y&Ri has been sponsorii - mask till 
dawn on radio in nine cities the past seven years. 

Well. Texaco (C&W) is considering the same thing but on a much bigger scale. 

Meantime. C&Ws canvassing stations via their reps on the availability of open time and 
< "-t of such an operation. 

Could he the key target is the all-night diners patronized by long-haul truck drivers 
and traveling salesmen who drive after dark to avoid heavy traffic. 

IN network -:ro«- time billings this May totaled S55.469.790. a plus of 6.8^. 

The TvB reported billings by network: ABC TV. .<12.8T6.05n. up 29.5^ : CBS T\ 
up -IS : NBC TV. S19.396.704. down L4%. 

I^din & Fink proposes to reduce the list of 46 agencies bidding for the $1.75- 
inillion account (from McCann-Erickson) to six semi-finalists before making a 
choice. 

Included in I^&F's products is Stri-Dex. the center of that local spot radio buying 
hassle which was climaxed by this move from McCann-Erickson: advising those who took the 
L&F deal that they'd have to make the same rates available for Esso. which had done its 
contracting at the national rate. L&F became wroth over the notice. 

One report was that the emissary L&F sent out on the road to buy at local rates was pre- 
armed with availabilities collected by the asency. 

The blitz technique — concentrating the week's spot load in two days seems to 

be taking hold in spot tv. especially when it's tied in with a run-of schedule plan. 

Two accounts that were shopping around last week for stations to earn- such campaigns: 
Nor. bo (LaRoche) and Warner-Lambert (Lambert & Feasley). The W-L product: 
Moon Clow, a mint-type face cream, with over |] million due to be spent for its national intro- 
duction. 

Contemplated spans: \orelco. from around 15 September through New Year's: Moon 
Glow, 15 July to 15 September. The shaver would use 110 stations, concentrate on the 
weekend. Ibasi - buy on rating points. 

1 irmr-l^ambert i- testing a new mouthwash. Nicrin, in a batch of tv markets. 

Sellers of spot radio can take this tip from exceptionally hep agency mediamei t: direct 
more of yoaw effort- at the smaller brand managers in large firms. 

lib of the advire: show the managers of two or three of these smaller brands how- 
lb. \ . in gel the maximum efficiency out of investing as a combination in spot radio 
; '-f linking themselves up with their company's major brands in network tv. 
Tell them how such an amalgamation works for their own brands" best welfare and how the 
frequency they get outmatches in impact the minor end of the piggyback commercial. 

-or • 4 JOLT 1960 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



The station relations people at NBC TV and CBS TV can anticipate some added nudging 
from their affiliates as a result of ABC TV's making it possible for its stations to sell 
an extra 20-second chainbreak seven nights a week. 

ABC's grant : extension of the break to 40 seconds between the next to the last and 
last program on the nighttime schedule. 

The understanding is that the period will be sold in the form two 20's. ABC says it will 
bring pressure to bear if any affiliates elect to use the break for triple spotting. 

Some reps estimate that the additional seven 20's could mean as much as $100,000 
annually for, say, a station that gets about $300 for a 20-second spot. 

For ABC the stratagem could serve these two ends: (1) mitigate the irritation over 
the spread of spot carriers; (2) as a tool in bidding for primary affiliates in the 
two-station markets. 

The battle between ABC TV and NBC TV for the fall daytime dollar took on 
added heat this week as NBC unveiled its new program pricing. 

Inducements to come in and try the new shows are plenty: like offering a quarter- 
hour of Danny Thomas for $1,000 net for the first 13 weeks (the price thereafter will be 
$2,500) and the Jan Murray game show at the same figure. Incidentally, Loretta Young is 
now down to $2,500 — a cut of $500 per quarter-hour. 

Others on the latest program price sheet: Dough Re Mi, $200; Play Your Hunch, 
$2,800; Price Is Right, now obtainable for $3,000 and up to $3,900 in September; Concentra- 
tion, $3,000; Truth or Consequences, $2,825; It Could be You, $3,000; Dr. Malone, $1,000; 
Here's Hollywood, $1,000 now and $2,500 in September. 

The 10-11 a.m. period — with Dough and Hollywood — becomes class D time. 

(See article, page 29, for an analysis of what's happening to daytime network tv. Also 
NEWS WRAP-UP under Networks for new NBC TV policy on contiguity rates.) 

Phillips Petroleum (Lambert & Feasley) has picked up the open quarter pack- 
age of the 13 National Football League games on NBC TV this fall. 

The package price: around $550,000. 

This money is coming from another medium and not spot tv. The account will con- 
tinue its spot campaign in its present 79 markets. 

CBS TV is guarding its counsel on the subject, but a number of agencies expect the 
network to modify those new commercial ground rules which are supposed to go 
into effect 15 September. 

Two of the rules in particular which agencies are bitterly opposed to are these: 

1) Limiting the billboards to product identification; in other words, banning even 
a suggestion of product characterization or promotion. 

2) Discouraging the inclusion of two products via piggyback in a commercial 
on a sponsor's minor week. 

Note the agencies: they recognize that Frank Stanton has made certain commitments to 
Washington re commercial restraints but it is also incumbent on the network to realize that the 
money used for network is collected from a multiplicity of brands and that in 
many cases they can participate in network tv only under techniques that have 
grown up with the business. 

Incidentally, NBC TV has also notified its nighttime customers that come the fall 
their commercials on minor weeks will have to be restricted to a single product. 

P.S. : Sellers of spot see the implementation of these commercial restraints as probably 
resulting in a windfall for their medium. In other words, the small brands with small 
budgets will be coming back to spot instead of riding on their big brother brand's shoulder in 
network tv. 

4 JULY 1960 21 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Morse International is doing something immediate about lining up spot tv 
schedule! for tin- N Ick cold remedies. 

\- happened last year, Morse's media director Orrin Christy, Jr., head timebuyer Roy 
\l( \i<llc and assistant timebuyer Mary Ellen Clark are going on the road to settle sched- 
ule- with individual stations. 

It doesn't look as though Bates will do anything spot-wise about Anahist until it has 
dotted the "i's" and crossed the "t's" on the spot carrier buys it made from ABC TV and NBC 
I \ M ouple weeks back. There's about $2.5 million left in the kitty for spot tv. 

Why Studebaker (l)'Arcy) isn't using spot radio this summer: it's put the money 

Into 15 broadcasts of the World Jazz series on CBS Radio . 

The car's introduction plans for the fall, reports D'Arcy, are still in a fluid state. One 
lliing looks fairly certain: the line will be in tv. 

Look for Miles Laboratories (Wade) to introduce on spot tv this fall its new 

% itainin for children — Chocks — which was tested last spring in two midwest markets. 

The buying of heavy schedules in top markets will include the West Coast, making the 
(irsl time this has happened out of Wade, Chicago, instead of the agency L. A. office. 

Iccording to SRA estimate via Price Waterhouse, national spot radio billings 
for the first 1960 quarter came out about even with the first 1959 quarter. 

The estimated dollar volume for this year's quarter: $40,008,000. The estimated vol- 
ume for the 1959 quarter: $39,990,000. (First 1958 quarter: $43,368,000.) 

U. S. Tobacco is probably the first one in its field to diversify in the direction 
of packaged candies and nuts. 

The acquisitions from Citrus Foods, whose distribution has been limited to Pacific states: 
Red Cap, Love Nest, Full of Almonds and Best Pal brands. 

If you're looking for any material changes in tv set use by hours of the day, 
abont the only place you're going to find them is in the afternoon. 

Here's the latest Nielsen for number of homes tuned per average minute. 

PERIOD APRIL 1960 APRIL 1959 

9-10 a.m. 6,600,000 6,300,000 

10-11 a.m. 7,200,000 7,500,000 

1 1 a.m.-noon 9,200,000 9,700,000 

Noon-1 p.m. 11,100,000 10,700,000 

1-2 p.m. 10,200,000 9,200,000 

2 -". |>.m. 9.500,000 8,500,000 

34 pan. 9,500,000 9,000,000 

1-5 p-m, 11,400,000 11,200,000 

•'•I'-".. 11,100.000 14,100,000 

6-7 pan. 18,700,000 18,000,000 

7-8 p.m. 25,200,000 24,600,000 

R - 9 P-m. 29,000,000 29,300,000 

9 -10 P-m. 29,300,000 29,000,000 

'"•Hp-ni. 23,700,000 23,400,000 

For other news coverage In this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 26; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 00: Washington Week, page 55; SPONSOR 
Hears, page 58; T\ and Radio Newsmakers, page 66; and Film-Scope, page 56. 

sponsor • 4 JULY 1960 



NO WONDER THEY CALL 
BEAUMONT-PORT ARTHUR-ORANGE 
THE 

,7eXAS 
err 

SpqT 



W 



And only KFDM-TV 
Delivers all of 
Texas' 4th market 
Metropolitan Area— 304,194 
Total KFDM-TV 
Coverage Area— 753,597 
Preliminary 1960 Census Figures 




KFDM-TV 

CHANNEL 6 

Beaumont Port Arthur Orange 
D. A. Cannan, President 
C. B. Locke, Executive Vice President & 
General Manager 
r$\ Mott Johnson, Sales & Operations Manager 
JfcJ^T Peters-Griffin-Woodward, Inc. 



1 Dallas-Fort Worth 

2 Houston 

3 San Antonio 

4 BEAUMONT- 
PORT ARTHUR- 
ORANGE 

5 El Paso 

6 Corpus Christi 



4 July 1960 



WTHI-TV. 



the 

Number One 

single station 

market 

in 

America! 



WTHI-TV is a single 
station market of 
217,400 TV homes. 



An advertising dollar 

on WTHI-TV delivers 

more TV homes than 

many dollars in a 

multiple station 

market. 




WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL lO 

TERRE HAUTE, 

INDIANA 




49th and 
Madison 



rf by THE BOLLING CO. 



Year round boom 

I enjoyed your article on "Summer 
Radio, \ Boom at the Local Level." 
(SPONSOR, 20 June.) Actually, I be- 
lieve that radio as a whole is under- 
going a tremendous boom regardless 
■ ■I the weather. I know certainly that 
al \\UP> we have been enjoying a 
new appreciation of radio that began 
long before summer was officially 

lipoll US. 

With the changing tone of today's 
radio, featuring better music, news, 
special events, and public service, I 
think radio's boom may become a 
permanent thing. Believe me when 
\ou try to watch today's television 
you realize that today radio is better 
than e\er! 

Harry Novik 
gen. mgr. 
WL1B 
N.Y.C. 



Buffaloed, yes — stymied, no! 
I would like to call to your attention 
a fluff in your column "Ten-Second 
Spots" in the 20 June issue of spon- 
sor. 

In the item "Potabilities.'" you 
asked the question "Anyone ever hear 
of a Polish buffalo?" The answer is 
distinct]) and loudly yes. 

The \uroch (Bison Bonasus) of 
Europe is a member of the Bovidae 
family. \ native of Poland and many 
other Central European areas, it 
closelj resembles the slightly smaller, 
larger-headed \merican Bison or 
buffalo. 

The) have been hunted for vears 
b) the noblemen of the Central Euro- 
pean region and protected by them 
for their Bport. 

William .1. Miller 
assistant director 
radio, tv, [dm section 
American Cancer Society, Inc. 

\ ) .<:. 



Set count comment 

These are times that try men's souls. 
Your story "ABB's Set Count shows! 
reversals from Nielsen." 1 sponsor, 
20 June I was enough to give a sta- 
tion operator the heebie-jeebies. The 
fact that the two major research out- 
fits in the country count noses and 
come up with different figures for the 
same areas is a frightening one. 

It is even more frightening when! 
we realize that despite such differ- 1 
ences of research opinion, the agen- 
cies in the country base their market 
buys on information supplied by 
these organizations. Perhaps soon i 
this world of electronic wonders some/ 
genius may find a way to add sets of! 
figures together so they make sense; 
to evervone. 

William L. Putnam* 

pres. & gen. mgr. 

WWLP 

Springfield, Mass. 



This letter is primarily an expres- 
sion of gratitude to you people for 
making available not one. but two 
national set counts. 

While some figures don't agree, 1 
think that on the whole the ABB ano| 
Nielsen counts check out against eacli 
other uncommonly well. The SPONSOR 
format made the two studies easy t'< 
compare. 

I suppose that there's bound to be 
someone who'll pick the one country 
where figures show the largest dis 
crepancy and thereby seek to dis 
credit both studies and all simila 
work. 

However, sponsor has reaffirmec 
the importance of these research tool: 
to the industn bv giving them ampb 
space and reporting all the pertinen 
details. 

Marie Coleman 
Donahue & Coe, Inc 
N.Y.C. 



ASA 



5-CITY TV/RADIO 



SUBSCRIBER 

Our apologies to 

Atlanta, St. Louis, Boston, 

Dallas and some other cities! 



The new 5-City Directory, just off the press, 
contains more than 1900 listings, and 36 pages. 

It's the recognized tv/radio guide to 5 cities 
where 93% of all national spot business is 
bought. 

The 1960 directory is substantially bigger than 
any of its predecessors. You will find it more 
useful, and we hope you will forgive us if your 
city is not included. 

If you're a SPONSOR subscriber drop us a note 
and we'll send you a 5-City Directory with our 
compliments. 

If not, the price is 50£ each . . . 40£ in quanti- 
ties of 5 to 10 . . . 30C for 10 or more. 

If you're not a subscriber, enter your subscrip- 
tion now by using the form shown on this page. 
We'll send you, as a bonus, not only the 5-City 
Directory but also the 220 page 1959-60 Air 
Media Basics including Radio Basics, Tv 
Basics, Timebuying Basics, and much more. 




Sponsor Publications Inc. 

40 East 49th St., New York 17, N. Y. 

pj Send me copies of Sponsor's 5-city directory. 

□ Enter my subscription to Sponsor 
for one year at $8.00 and send me FREE 
the 5-CITY DIRECTORY & AIR MEDIA BASICS. 



NAME- 
TITLE— 



COMPANY. 
ADDRESS- 
CITY 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



RADIO EIREANN 



. • ■ - • 



DIRECTOR 
GENERAL 



- 

• •1 orcjniu 






ifi( jnd p»0 



JujhflCJtlO 



Administration Officer 

Radio Eireann 

General Post Office 

DUBLIN. IRELAND 




N * Or U .ins housewives 

sooth. |unior sized savage 

beasts 

KID SHOWS 
on WWL TV 

WWl-TV 

© " ORLEANS 



National and regional buys j 
in work nou or recently completed 



IUYS 



TV BUYS 

American Home Foods, Div. of American Home Product- Corp., 
New York: Campaign for Chi [-Boy- b--Dee products starts 7 July in 
about 60 markets. Daj and night minutes are being used for 24 
weeks. Buyer: Tom Viscard ing & Rubicam, New York. 

Anheuser-Busch, Inc., St Louis: Placing NTA's Third Man ad- 
venture film series in about 95 markets. Schedules start in October 
and November for 52 weeks \_- D'Arcj Co.. St. Louis. 

North American Philips Co., Inc., New York: Buying three-week 
schedules in about 80 markets to ^tart this month for Norelco elec- 
tric -' S lies are for prime and late night minutes and 
20's. Buyer: Lionel Schaen. Vgency: C. J. LaRoche, New York. 
Reader's Digest Association, Inc., Pleasantville, N. Y.: The one- 
w.-ek promotion for the August RD will he in about 60 markets. 
Schedules begin 21 Jul\ u-in^ primarily nighttime I.D.'s. Buyers: 
Mario Kircher and Carrie Senatore. Vgenc; : J. Walter Thompson 
York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York: Previous use of tv this year did 
not meet expectation-, so a test radio campaign is now planned in 
California markets. Dav minutes have been requested: start and 
length are indefinite at this time. Buyer: Rus- Barr\. Agencj : Ted 

^ ork. 

Fiat Motor Co., Inc., New York: Si heduling traffic and weekend 
minuti 5, 20-2 eek per market, in about 28 markets for its Fiat 

car. Run i- in two flights. 30 June through 24 July, 11 through 28 
August. Bu\er: Tom Ellis. Vgency: Grant Advertising, Inc., New 
York. 

Northwest Airlines, Inc., St. Paul: Campaign for its new travel 
promotion begins this month for 26 weeks. Schedules of minutes are 
being run in Dallas, Madison, Milwaukee. W ashington, D. C. Yia^ara 
ball-. Rochester and v t. Louis. Vgency: Campbell-Mithun, Inc.. 
( liii ago. 

American Tobacco Co., New York: \b.-ut 50 markets are getting 
summer and fall schedules for Lucky Mrike. Two-flight campaign 
-l, Hi- the fir-t week in Jul\ for eight-nine we^k-. pi( k- up anain earlv 
*-m weeks. Buyer: lb.;.- Martinez. Vgency: BBDO. 
New York. 

Mennen Co., Morristown, N. J.: New activity on the Mennen line 
starts lati Inn. and earl) July. Daj minutes and chainbreaks of 
fairl) heavj frequent ■- beduled in the top market- for 

21 \\'rk-. Buyer: Joe Hudack. Vgency: Warwick ^ Leder. New 
York. 

-I-, >nsob • 4 july 1960 



[ "The Sound of Music over the City of Angels" 

ON THE ALL NEW 



50T000 

WATTS 




Los 4*^ 
Angeles 



THE NEW KGBS: now covers all the 
Southern California market with ten 
times the power... delivers more 
buying families per dollar invested 
than any other station in Los 
Angeles! New call letters to match 
KGBStyle programming: smooth, 



reports, weather 

and traffic 

briefs 



word creatively 
scripted, tastefully 
delivered! Still holds 
the same "action" spot 
at the center of the dial 
-1020-now attracting 
more attention than ever 
with one of the largest audience 
promotion campaigns Los Angeles 
has ever seen. National Sales Representa- 
tive: Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., In Los Angeles: 
Dale Peterson, DUnkirk 8-2345-KCBS, 338 S. Western Avenue 
Los Angeles 5, California. Another Great Storer Station.. .in Los Angeles. 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



WCTV-land 





LAND OF 



\r\ VCAD DAflMn CDCKmiKir. mm (f 



AND YEAR-ROUND SPENDING, TOO 



There's no feast-or-f amine business cli- 
mate in WCTV-LAND such as is sometimes 
experienced a little farther South where 
tourism is a major Industry. Here stable 
business conditions and a wonderful cli- 
mate let folks enjoy year-round good 
living and spend money year-round, too. 
Tallahassee actually stands fifth in the 



nation in retail sales per household.* To 
get their share of this rich market more 
and more leading brands are placing 
strong, long-term spot schedules on 
VVCTV. Get the full story from Blair Tele- 
vision Associates. 

' Annual Survey of Buying Power, 1959. 




WCTV 



TALLAHASSEE 



CE) 






THOMASVILLE 



a John H. Phipps 
Broadcasting Station 
TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 

National Representatives 



^ SPONSOR 

4 JULY 1960 



WILL 'ROCK 
BOTTOM' COSTS 
SPUR DAYTIME 
NETWORK TV? 




NEW PRICING and packaging for daytime at NBC TV was launched a 
fortnight ago in session conducted for sales staff by Robert McFadyen 
(standing, r), mgr., daytime sales, and James Hergen (standing, I), sis. dir. 



For the first time in day tv 
history, there are portents of a 
swing away from the long-time 
buyer's market. Pricing and pro- 



graming have leveled off to a new 
stability, and the three nets are 
lining up evenly for the fall sea- 
son's starting positions. 



Wn 



ithin the last two weeks, NBC 
TV made two moves which may well 
mark the end of daytime network tv's 
downward pitch and the start of an 
upward thrust. 

The network revised its costing — 
with, for example, a quarter hour of 
the Loretta Young series marked 
down $500 for a total of $2,500 for 
13 weeks — and it permitted adver- 



tisers with multiple buys to scatter 
commercials in checkerboard fashion 
throughout the broadcast schedule as 
well as in standard vertical fashion. 

Daytime observers think the long 
series of price slashing and show 
shuffling is nearing an end, with the 
networks emerging as near-equals in 
their fight for next season's sales. 

Thev sav three years of action and 



reaction have placed the nets at an 
irreducible cost minimum yet at a 
maximum of value. 

But daytime's new position of up- 
ward movement is nudging buyers 
out of their long-held catbird seats. 
The direction is toward a more fa- 
vorable balance of negotiation be- 
tween the buyer and seller, now that 
the sellers have reached a financial 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



29 



NETWORK RATE COMPARISONS— AT A GLANCE 



< /f/vs I hour rait' 



$130,330 



$129,045 



11 a.m.-l:30 p.m. (Class D) 



8:15-11 a.m. (D); 



SeUcork daytii 

tele* OSt litmrs 



2-5 p.m. (Class D); 



I a.m.-l:05 p.m. (0; 



11 a.m.-l p.m. !C): 



2-5 p.m. (0 



Station affiliate* 



! 



ABC TV and < 



i SBC T\ • Ifeodaj t trough-Friday schedules. 



point from which the) cannot retreat. 
I hi- bottom-of-the-barrel poeitii 

alarming as it ma] seem at fii>t , 
praiaaJL, actuall) places the network- 
in a better daytime -tance than evei 
before. 

rhey're all Martini: of! in about the 

- j >• >-~i t i < >ri in the race for 

. las time dollars. And the\'re racing 

Under the -am.- rules and limitation?. 

Network men think the>e low bar- 
gain price- will force new business 
into the medium, and that these new 
daytime clients will he willing to pa\ 
a higher cost when the merit- of the 
medium have been proven. 

Hut there are other reasons win 
advertisers are showing new interest 
in da) time hour-. 

Warren Hahr. \ i< .■ president and 
-• dire, tor of 

planning and -• 
at ^ oung Jk Rubicam, 
put- it this waj : "Day- 
rime ha- finall) found 
It- always 
ible to deliver 
audieni ••- ,,i a reason- 
able pri. .-. hut ,,,, v% it' a 
delivering an appeal 

product r.run- ol 

nighttime - 

of all three networks 

evded off. to.,. 

"IIUIII- 
ind .III- 

l'la\ mg 
impor- 



tion of program vehicle and network. 
The nets have slowed down their 
raids of each others programs and 
are stabilizing their schedules by re- 
taining old properties and developing 
new ones. 

The long period of "adjustment" 
and "transition" — the words most 
frequently used to describe the state 
of network daytime tv — is ending. 
Its being replaced with a temporarv 
but primary emphasis on costs, reach 
and frequency . However. trade 
sources think the longer view will 
- -ome of the broader features 
more identified with nighttime tv : 
audience characteristics, impact, mer- 
chandisability. prestige — the qualita- 
tive factor-. 

W hat are national advertisers and 



GENERAL FOODS Is major daytime net and spot buyer througi 
plans are discussed by Warren Bahr (r), v.p. and assoc. director, 
strategy, Y&R. with Larry Israel (I), v.p. and general mai 




their agencies looking for in day- 
time? Reach as well as frequencv. 
bu\ers agree. Frequency has been 
the traditional strong point of day- 
time, which is tuned to bv a hard 
core of women day in and day out. 
And reach has been the prerogative 
of nighttime, with its large undupli- 
cated audiences. 

But the "scatter" plans — the check- 
erboard splitting of daytime sales 
rticalry and horizontally 
throughout the networks" davtime 
schedules — have added to the reach 
of the daytime hours. 

Daytime selling has cut across and 
down all viewing segments so that 
"scattered " commercials reach the 
maximum audience. 

The reach is formidable. Half of 

all women in the U.S. 

Y&R. New —28 million of them- 

jlanning and tune to daytime tv ii 

ager TvAR. tne COU rse f a Mee k. 

Television Bureau of 
Advertising reports. 

The average woman 
viewer watches 11.2 
quarter hours of pro- 
graming on the aver- 
age weekday. But. 
TvB adds, significant 
hours of viewing dur- 
ing the daytime are at- 
tributable also to men. 
who tune an average 
of 7.1 quarter hours 
each dav. 

The broader audi- 
ence achieved through 



cattering and the lowered costs of 
hese audiences — both innovations 
nade by ABC TV since it entered the 
laytime arena less than two years 
go — are credited with the over-all 
ales gain of the medium last year. 

In 1959, network daytime sales 
fere up some 17% from the previous 
ear for a total of $203 million, with 
laytime spot rising 22% to a total of 
223 million. All told, daytime in- 
estors spent $426 million for time 
eriods. This year, network showed 

decline in the first quarter, with 
pot losing out in minor markets. 

Industry people think that the loss 
f network daytime billings in the 
irst quarters was picked up by night- 
ime tv rather than by spot. And net- 
fork sales executives tend to think, 
n line with this fact of sales life, that 
heir prime prospects are from the 
lue-chip clients buying nighttime 
letwork, not daytime spot. 

The nighttime advertiser using net- 
work has a distribution and market- 
rig pattern which can match daytime 
lelivery as well as nighttime. But the 
laytime spot advertiser's marketing 
iroblem is such that in many cases 
mrchase of a network would involve 
caste in two ways: (a) by the addi- 
ion of markets in which he isn't 
eally interested and (b) by getting 
riore or fewer impressions than he 
reeds in certain cities. 

James Hirgen, director of sales for 
<JBC TV daytime, sees the daytime- 
lighttime rivalry drawn along these 
ines: "Personal identification is 
tronger with daytime personalities. 
vho are companions more than thev 
ire entertainers. And a combination 
»f day and night sponsorship gives 
he reach and frequency a national 
idvertiser needs with very favorable 
liscounts." 

Edward Bleir, ABC TV daytime 
ales director, comments further on 
he difficulty in attracting nighttime 
ponsors to daytime hours. "Night- 
iime buys are emotion-laden. Day- 
ime has no story conferences, West 
|:oast trips, dancing girls and David 
Susskinds — no glamour. But it does 
liave strong personalities selling, and 
his has gone by the boards pretty 
nuch at night. Admittedly, daytime 
pan't sell to the trade — but we can 
jmd do sell women and a great num- 
ber of men." 

He lists what agency media execu- 
lives want to know about ABC's, as 



TWO CHICAGO MEDIA MEN SPEAK OUT 
ON SEVERAL FACETS OF DAYTIME TV 




N. T. Garrabrant, med. dir., North Adver. Harold G. Tillson, med. mgr.. Leo Bi 



ADVERTISERS interested in 
reaching housewives find net and 
spot day tv very useful. Day is 
usually more economical than 
night to reach these people, but 
day tv spot schedules — particu- 
larly those calling for 60 seconds 
or more — are difficult to obtain 
in quantity in markets with less 
than four stations. However, if 
products have national distribu- 
tion, very efficient daytime net 
buys are possible. 

Via network, any given num- 
ber of commercials per week may 
be obtained. The. more purchased, 
the greater efficiency. Many com- 
mercials may be integrated by 
star performers. 

Nets offer a variety of pro- 
gram types. Through research, 
you can select program type, 
audience profile best suited for 
shoiv-casing. 

Considerable flexibility is 
available in daytime. It is cer- 
tainly easier to merchandise a 
net program than spot. . . There's 
also a psychological value to an 
advertiser being in the "big 
time," on network. There is no 
question but that national tele- 
vision advertising connotes prod- 
uct reliability. 



DAY TV — one of the most ver- 
satile of media — is many things 
to many different people. . . It 
can be and is used by a host of 
advertisers, from the very large — 
using it heavily on a continuing 
basis, to the very small — invest- 
ing the entire appropriation in a 
timely, short-term effort. 

Its primary advantage: ability 
to put tv's power and effective- 
ness to work against reasonably 
large groups of women — most 
important factor in purchase of 
many products — at economical 
and affordable cost. 

Perhaps there are some cases 
where spots can be purchased 
with greater statistical efficiency 
{than network), but few adver- 
tisers can afford the dollar cost of 
reasonable spot activity in 150 
or 175 markets. 

Programing also offers full 
minute commercials within pro- 
gram content, varying degrees of 
program identification, inherent 
prestige and importance of pro- 
gram sponsorship. 

Daytime offers known values 
at an economical cost with rela- 
tively little risk, with short-term 
commitments. That's probably 
why so many use it. 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



well .1- othei nets, daytime plans: 

•■\\ bat's ih\ . osl |'ii commercial? 
\\ hat's the home deliver] per com- 
-i pei 1,000 homes? 
and "f women ' I otal home impres- 
rions f..i the dollar? Number of dif- 
fiTt-iii home impressions (the net 
come audience) for the dollar? The 
Fr eq u e nc y with which \«'ii reach each 
..( these ilitli-r.nl homes? \\ lure are 
these homea < b) count] Bize < ?" 

He supplements 1 1 » « -— * - quantitative 
questions with i few encompassing 
less tangible factors in a buying de- 
. ision. 

"\\ hat's the program climate and 

fled favor on m\ |)r.)(luct? 

Do I Irani a live BeD w it h an emcee 

..r -t.u .' What opportunity is there 

for merchandising and exploitation?" 

Ml of the networks strive to an- 
swer these questions, and to conduct 
a* mix li -ah-- developmental research 
aa their slim income will allow. But 
the] have again a stumbling block 
in cost Research is expensive, and to 
be effective it must be original. Yet 
a tremendous amount of original re- 
search i- conducted bj major adver- 
tisers and their agencies in areas 
which relate directl] to the house- 
wife, her habit and emotional pat- 
tern-, her buying and tune-in pref- 
erences. 

Networks in order to learn some- 
tbing new with national significance 
fur a prospect or a client, would have 
to spend a disproportionate amount 

■ •n market and audience research. 

The] also, commented one sales 
evi utive wryly, "don't have the bene- 
fit of knowing what the client has 

alread] learned. Agencies keep these 
-ur\e\- and Studies under close 

•i though the\ hear directly 
on our mutual problem." 

Admen expect the upward trend to 
evolve along these general lines. 
With costs competitive and low, ad- 
rertisers will move in to test dav- 

tl ej -ei results, they'll be 
willing to pa] higher 
though the . ii. ulation will never in- 
- it did in the nighttime 
hours. 

Iditional network revenue 
will enable the network- to further 
explore two areas in which they've 
been bot t lenecked: programing and 



A SECOND LOOK AT 

*-" Nc\l reasons prime time net tv programing Mill 
find 18 hour shows a week selling as participations 

^ Some admen are beginning to wonder, however, if 
th cm' new buys are all that they're cracked up to be 



N 



low that nighttime scheduling at 
the networks has just about been 
nailed down for the fall, a lot of tv 
industry people are doing a "double 
take" over the high incidence of spot 
carriers. Next season will find about 
1H prime time hours sold as partici- 
pating shows with two more that 
might he classed as "semi spot car- 
riers" i ABC TV's Maverick and Hong 
Kong\. Question: How will this new- 
type of selling affect the tv scene? 

Several agency media people have 
expressed some disillusion over their 
buys on spot carrier programs. W hat 
they say is this: The network sells 



the participations to the client and 
perhaps to the agency tv producer as 
a low cost way of getting into net tv. 
and the client okays a budget based 
on the estimated time cost supplied 
by the network. But when the media 
department gets the list of cleared sta- 
tions, it discovers some uhf stations 
have been included — stations it would 
not have ordered. 

When a protest is lodged, say these 
admen, the net salesman comes back 
with a list of good "additional" sta- 
tions which the client might like to 
order — at. of course, additional cost. 

As one adman put it: "It seems 









VIEWS ON THE PARTICIPATIONS 

^^ Hf^al aa^LV $P oi carriers on network tv are easy to buy . . . 

mj IJI I They enable many advertisers with limited budg- 

I M ^^B ets to capitalize on at least a degree of show 

prestige and identity . . . In many cases they are 

a way to get full minute announcements in prime 

tv time i with spot, they might have to settle for 20 seconds or 

chainbreaks) . Hence many copywriters like the idea . . . By 

taking several participations on different nights in different 

shows, reach can be good . . . Program decisions are left to nets 



4^^^k ^1 Spot carrier buys may be easier to handle than 

I Ml market-by-market buys in national spot, but do 

uull they deliver the frequency needed in certain 

markets? . . . They are national in concept, say 

reps, but sales are local . . . For a certain type 

of product, a housewife in Baltimore may be north five times 

more than one in Deadwood. Kansas . . . Some admen claim some 

participations were sold on basis of low cost : later budget had to 

be upped to add stations . . . Product protection may suffer 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



THOSE NET 'SPOT CARRIERS' 



net salesmen have invented a tech- 
nique for adjusting a client's budget 
while collecting their commissions." 
Said another, "They start with the 
smallest possible sale, then build it 
up." 

So it not only is the agency tv pro- 
ducers who are a little concerned over 
the loss of control on shows. As buy- 
ers of participations, they have little 
to say on show content. But the me- 
dia people are wondering about their 
lack of control on station line-ups 
and product protection. 

With network spot carriers turning 
up so frequently across the board, 
product protection all but goes out 
the window. Since individual sta- 
tions often don't know the scheduling 
or rotation of network minute an- 
nouncements, they must face the risk 
of throwing in a chainbreak spot com- 
mercial that may be in direct compe- 
tition with the network commercials 
in front or in back of it. 

This is one of the things that wor- 
ries station reps; the other worry is 
the way that nets seem to be going 
after the accounts they once regarded 
as spot advertisers. But they and the 
stations say they plan no counter- 
attacks save harder selling. Rates, 
they say, will not be cut for national 
spot, although it is possible that many 
stations may work a little harder to 
iron out the complexities that have 
developed in their rate cards. In 
checking a number of rep firms, 
sponsor learned that they have pretty 
much decided — since they can't do 
much about it any way — to live with 
the networks' new selling tactics. 

"In a way. what the networks are 
doing," says Halsey Barrett, director 
of tv sales development for The Katz 
Agency, " is a compliment and tribute 
to national spot." This seems to sum 
up most rep thinking on the situation. 
Network, they feel, is helping to sell 
the spot concept, and it admittedly is 
easier to buy network than to buy 
spot. The only thing they hope is 
that clients will see the need for more 
market-by-market flexibility, the need 
for greater frequencv of announce- 
ments in some areas than in others. 



THESE HOUR PRIME TIME SHOWS 
ALL WILL BE PARTICIPATIONS 

ABC TV 

PROCRAM NIGHT 


The Islanders 






SUNDAY 


Cheyenne 






MONDAY 


Surfside 6 






MONDAY 


g Adventures in Paradise 




MONDAY 


| Stagecoach West 






TUESDAY 


Hawaiian Eye 






WEDNESDAY 


Naked City 






WEDNESDAY 


\\ The Untouchables 






THURSDAY 


77 Sunset Strip 






FRIDAY 


The Roaring '20's 






SATURDAY 




CBS TV 






The Aquanaut 






WEDNESDAY 


Rawhide 






FRIDAY 


Perry Mason 






SATURDAY 


NBC TV 


Riverboat 






MONDAY 


Laramie 






TUESDAY 


Thriller (Anthology) 




TUESDAY 


The Outlaw 






THURSDAY 


Raven 






FRIDAY 





This they feel is tremendously impor- 
tant especially where launching new 
products is concerned. 

The fact remains that networks do 
have something solid to offer adver 
tisers — and with control of shows pas 
sing into network hands (with the bles 
sings of Washington I whatever they 
are selling becomes more valuable 
Networks proved during the past fev 
vears they know programing basics 

Meanwhile, the networks will go on 
selling participations because they 
are offering the prestige of shows to 



main advertisers with limited budg- 
ets, and they are delivering coverage 
in the national sense. And thev are 
offering considerable flexibility inas- 
much as buys into these shows can 
often be for short terms. 

But spot salesmen are counting on 
advertisers to bolster such buys with 
spot schedules to take advantage of 
the differences that exist in markets 
across the country. Said Barrett, 
"Chile con came is mostlv beans — 
but do you sell it the same way in 
Boston as in San Antonio?" ^ 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



m 



■ >.- 
1 1\ 







CREATOR at work. Gumbinner writer Lisker mulls problem of disti 



^ Sacramento Tomato Juice stays on top in New York 
with radio campaign based on sound made when poured 

^ Maintains two-station lineup with heavy emphasis 
on merchandising; scores best first quarter in history 



f^. \.w Jerse) restaurant's menu 
reads, Sacramento Tomato Juice: 
two plops, 1.15; four plo| 

I li.ii- .1 result ->\ the juice's latest 

n in metropolitan New 

^ ork, where the hulk of it- business 

ted. Vnothei resull is 

record-breaking first 

there, 21', ahead ..f the 

• '""I last year, and tin- up- 

moth ■ indica- 



tion of how creative use of sound can 
move merchandise. 

\» <>f last February, Sacramento's 
advertising, totally in radio since 
I { )-~>(>. Iia- revolved around the sound 
ii makes when poured from the can — 
namely, "It's bo rich it plop-."' 
Backed b) a deadl) serious announc- 
er's "March of Time"' delivery, the 
e.t.'s demonstrate \ariation in Sacra- 
mento plops when poured into all de- 



scriptions of drinking vessels from 
different heights. 

The manufacturer, Bercut-Richards 
Packing Co. of Sacramento, Calif., 
il- New York broker, J. Houck & Co., 
and the Lawrence C. Gumbinner ad- 
vertising agency are having a lot of 
fun with this whimsical approach to 
the product's distinguishing charac- 
teristics — profitable fun at that. Says 
agency v.p.radio/tv director Paul 
Gumbinner, "It has proved a wonder- 
ful way to express the superiority of 
Sacramento and hold the radio audi- 
ence's attention." 

The media strategy involves a one- 
two punch found effective by Gum- 
binner for a number of its radio ac- 
counts. Two stations are in action 
most of the year, one selected pri- 
marily for its merchandising prowess. 
the other because of quantity and/or 
quality of audience delivered. 

During the first 13 weeks of its 
new campaign. Sacramento was on 
WNBC (formerly WRCA) for 37 
spots a week, and aired 14 weekly an- 
nouncements over W NEW. The fol- 
lowing 13-week foray, currently un- 
derway, is in the hands of WOR, 
which carries 14 spots a week, and 
WQXR with a total of 18. 

The merchandising portion of the 
job has been handled primarily by 
WNBC in the first flight, then by 
WOR. They work closely with the 
chain stores to obtain for Sacramento 
special displays, advantageous shelf 
position, window streamers, and other 
point-of-purchase aids, plus inclusion 
in the chains' newspaper ads. Sacra- 
mento's broker, Houck, keeps posted 
on the timing of this activity and con- 
tacts the chains in regard to stocking 
up on the product for a coming push. 
Houck arranges to have cooperating 
chains mentioned in the radio com- 
mercials. 

Sacramento buys all minutes. They 
run Monday through Saturday more 
or less evenly distributed over the 
morning, early afternoon, and early 
evening hours, to reach a broad audi- 
ence. Housewives constitute the prime 
target, but the advertiser also goes 
after male support. "WVre delighted 
to have the man specif y Sacramento 
to his wife or order it in restaurants, 
plain or as part of a Bloody Mary 
cocktail" states Paul Gumbinner. 



4 july 1960 



Thus Sacramento buys early a.m. 
traffic time spots and 6-7 p.m. news 
strip adjacencies as well as the more 
housewife-oriented late a.m. and early 
afternoon slots. And, further to in- 
sure a broad audience the advertiser 
changes stations after every 13-week 
cycle. 

The Sacramento radio commercials 
lead off with 20 seconds of tran- 
scribed plop sound effects, described 
with journalistic urgency by the an- 
nouncer. Here's the script for one of 
the three variations now in circula- 
tion : 

Announcer: Listen — to Sacramento 
Tomato Juice plopping into a glass 
from a height of two inches. 

Sound: PLOPPING OF JUICE IN 
GLASS 

Announcer: A louder plop as Sac- 
ramento Tomato Juice plops into a 
glass at 12 inches. 

Sound: SAME— LOUDER 

Announcer: Two feet! 

Sound: LOUDER 

Announcer: Three feet! 

Sound: EVEN LOUDER— GLASS 
CRASHES 

Announcer: This message has been 
brought to you as a public service by 

SOUNDS at work for Sacramento Tomato Juic< 
poured into glass by copywriter Tom Lislcer. This 



people who love Sacramento Tomato 
Juice. 

The other e.t.'s find Sacramento 
being plopped into a mug, an earthen- 
ware jug, and the piece de resistance, 
a champagne glass sitting on a bass 
drum. It gets poured with the left 
hand, plopping with the same sound 
as with the right, but when poured 
with both hands gives off greater vol- 
ume, while the announcer exclaims, 
"Notice — when you double the 
amount of Sacramento Tomato Juice 
pouring into a glass — it plops twice 
as loud!" 

Tom Lisker, copywriter behind 
the Sacramento campaign, says, 
"We've added a visual dimension to 
radio commercials. All of this pour- 
ing, with the left hand, or both hands, 
into different kinds of containers, 
gives the listener a visual image. 
This should make much more of an 
impression than a purely audio ef- 
fect." 

The remaining 40 seconds of the 
Sacramento commercials are presided 
over by the station personality on the 
air at the time. He is provided with 
fact sheets and sample scripts, but is 
urged to get the message across in his 



v director Paul Gumb 
:al n3w radio campaig 



own way. Gumbinner believes in fully 
using the talents which have put these 
personalities over with the public. 

"Those d.j.'s who go in for humor 
have had a ball with this campaign," 
Gumbinner relates, "and it isn't un- 
usual for them to enjoy themselves so 
much they run overtime on our com- 
mercials. While the newscasters for 
the most part play it straight, even 
some of them such as WNBC's Ken 
Banghart can't resist having a little 
fun with the copy." 

Can after can of the product was 
used in putting together the e.t.'s. 
The sounds were built around use of 
the actual juice, but eventually some 
"sound mixing" was needed to bring 
them out more vividly. For instance, 
pouring with both hands into the 
same glass tended to produce a great- 
er number of plops but not neces- 
sarily plops that were twice as loud 
as with one hand. So the Sacramento 
crew made separate recordings of one 
can being poured into a glass and 
mixed them for heightened sound. 

Under wraps at the agency is a new 
series of plops to mystify and delight 
the radio audience on behalf of Sacra- 
mento come next fall. ^ 



; plops emitted when tomato j 
i that's "so rich it plops when you pour i 









Volkswagen car for 
than 500 guests attended 



N. Y. buyers take over the town 



^ (tohii Stations Treasure Hunt pits 65 five-buyer agency teams seeking cluesi 
l«;uling to 25 prizes. They scoured 10 sites, from flea circus to Empire State Bldg, 



W, 



well be New York's 
biggest buying spree took place a 
f'Ttniulit ago in the midst <>f Central 
P. nk as more than '5(H) buyers and 
media executives from ad agencies 
scrambled around midtown Manhat- 
tan in an effort to win top prizes in 

e limit. 

Ml told, the guests numbered about 

> (M > I":' - dia executives 

i" participate in the 

• inging from a 

u h mink Btoles 

: ndil 

sts met in the 
' the Tavern 



on the Green for a cocktail reception, 
when they were given their first clues 
to the hidden treasure, and then sent 
oil their waj in 65 cabs. The sprint- 
ing was spirited and the search com- 
petitive, with prizes for the five teams 
returning the soonest to claim their 
reward. 

Ml in all. 65 teams of five persons 
each participated, with five of the 65 
coming in for prizes. Everyone left 
d winner, though, as Washington jel- 
lies, jams, cheeses were distributed. 

I In- first of five team winners won 
a Volkswagen car and four color tv 
-el-, with each of the five team mem- 



bers on the second squad receiving a 
mink stole I see picture captions). 

Team winners for the three other 
teams not mentioned in the picture 
captions follow. Air conditioners: 
lark Mitchum, B&B: Frank McCue. 
D-F-S; Marcia Roberts. Y&R; Al 
Randal. BBDO: Thorn Leidnen JWT. 
Movie projectors: Greg Sullivan 
Bates: Len Soglio. Hicks & Greist: 
Hal Simpson. Esty : Roy Terzi. D-F-S 
Ethel W eidner. Compton. Cameras 
Stuart Hinkle. B&B; Frank Howlett 
L&N; Stu Eckert, DCS&S: John Eck 
stein. W exton: Ann Janowicz, Ogil 
Benson & Mather. 1 




iAZERS focused telescope on sign atop 
mpire State Bldg. for another clue. (L to 
|: Roy Terzi, D-F-S; John White, Blair- 
V, and Al Mansini, Edward Petry Co. 




BEFORE THE CHASE, this buyer and seller group converged 01 one of four bars (I to r): 
Herb Gruber, Parkson agency; Harold Veltman, JWT; Ruth Bayer, Parlcson; John Meskil, 
McCann-Marshallt; Mary Ellen Clark, Morse; Fred Wallin, Blair. Host stations were KING 
AM-TV, Seattle; KGW AM-TV, Portland; KREM AM-TV, Spokane, Wash., for 20 June event 




: EEDING of buyers finds Joe Levy sharing 
:ocktail plate with Betty Nasse, both of 
?rey Advertising, at reception before the 
wo-hour search around Manhattan was begun 



v\INK TREE was one of donations of the 
>own Stations group, president of which is 
vlrs. A. Scott Bullitt, who welcomed guests 
it Central Park's outdoor Tavern on Green 





FIRST among five winning team (I to r): 
Dick Olsen, DCS&S; Gloria Mahaney, 
JWT; Mai Ochs, Grey; Grace Porterfield, 
B&B; Jerry Rettig, Grey (who won the car) 



BALLOONS festooned tables, this one 
with (I to r) Howard Gerber, B&B; Bob 
Silberberg, B&B; Evelyn Jones and Peter 
Dalton, both of Donahue & Coe ad agency 




MEN WON minks, modeled by guests. Winners: Tim Tully, Compton; Bill Warn 
Bob Silberberg, B&B; Herb Werman, Grey; Lynn Saliberg, D-F-S. Gene Rayburn * 



AIR MEDIA BASICS': WATCH FOR IT 

^ Fourteenth edition of SPONSOR'S annual compendium of radio and tv fact* 
*ill feature, among other things, a listing of timebuyers in major U. S. cities 



most exhaust 

h advertising 

t„l,l. w iU soon I"- in the bands of 

d sellers. 

I he I Itli annual edition, scheduled 

f..r publication t Ii*- .-ml of Jul\. will 

feature, for the first tin 
1957, /■".'•' ■ ' ■ •' com- 

prehenshre listing of air media buyers 
in those rnark«-t~ accounting f'»r nt-ar- 
l\ all national advertising on the air. 
The timebuyers listing will -tart in 
fir \l I «ill be con- 

tinued in succeeding issues of the 
Mreekl) sponsor during the months of 
.1 SeptemJ er. 

ghtl) organized than ever 
an«l containing both new and up-dated 
material, the neu edition will con- 
sist of four sections Timebuying 
Radio Bask s, Tele\ ision l!a- 
-i< - and Film 8 Basics 

• for ease of use, the honk. 



which "ill contain 250-odd charts in 
addition to it- listings, come? replete 
with indexes and sub-indexes plus 
topi< identification <>n each page. 

The huge mas- of material is 
heav) with audience data and mate- 
rial on costs and expenditures in the 
air media. But there is also a vari- 
ed of other useful data. This in- 
clude- material of a bow-to nature, 
tools usahle in the even day routine 
of hu\ers and concise summaries of 
important trends. T\pical charts 
from Air Media Basics can be found 
on the next three pages. 

Do \ou know what "viewing group 
anabsis" is and what it can tell you.' 
See Timebuying Basics. Do you want 
some notion of what percent of a 
market's home- a station can reach in 
a week? See Radio Basics. Do you 
need some background material on 
foothall audiences? See Television 

- - 



HERE'S 'AIR MEDIA BASICS' INDEX 



1 TIMEBUYING BASICS — In addi- 
tion to featuring "Timebuyers of 
the U.S.." this section will con- 
tain material on general adver- 
tising expenditures, cost estimators for 
spot radio and tv. a variety of tools for 
timebuyers. explanations of some of the 
more technical factors in understanding 
ratings, and data on station coverage. 



2RA0I0 BASICS— Details on both 
in-home and out-of-home listen- 
ing will be included in this sec- 
tion. Also, there will be data on 
spending in the medium, a new sub- 
section on fm which will go into audi- 
ence characteristics, set production and 
penetration; network patterns, radio di- 
mensions, cume audience data on radio. 



3 TELEVISION BASICS -Included 
will be dimensions of the medi- 
um, various material on viewing 
habits, a number of pages on 
color tv. spending by major advertisers 
in both spot and net. net programing 
patterns, set production and set sales 
figures, tv spending by industries, agen- 
cy expenditures, cume audience data. 



4 FILM & TAPE BASICS — Among 
the areas covered will be syndi- 
cation costs by market, lists of 
syndication users and what they 
use. lists of commercial producers and 
their specialties, stations equipped with 
tape, tape producers, etc. In addition 
there will be listing of winners from 
the Tv Commercials Festival & Forum. 



The word "basics" is not used care- 
It — 1\ in the fact book's name. There 
is a wealth of basic data on radio 
and tv in general, such as hour-by- 
hour sets in use. radio and tv owner- 
ship bv \ears. set production by 
\ears. advertising expenditures by 
various industries, average network 
ratings b\ program type and the like. 
Here is a more detailed rundown 
of the four major sections: 

Timeburing Basics: This will in- 
clude data on general advertising ex- 
penditures by major clients, national 
and local ad trends, cost estimators 
for spot radio and tv. tools for time- 
buvers. illustrations of some of the 
more technical factors in understand- 
ing ratings and general coverage data 
to help understand the reach of radio 
and tv stations under various condi- 
tions of power, channel number and 
terrain. Timebuyers of the I .5. will 
be in this section. 

Radio Basics: Among the areas 
covered will be radio home owner- 
ship bv years, regions and county 
size, set production bv vears and type 
of set. data on spending by advertis- 
ers and by various sectors of the ra- 
dio medium < spot, network and lo- 
cal » . material on fm i such as listen- 
ing patterns, audience characteristics, 
set production, set penetration), out- 
of-home listening, network patterns 
and cumulative audience data on spot 
radio. 

Television Basics: As in Radio Ba- 
sics, there will be home ownership 
data by years, region and county size. 
viewing figures looked at from differ- 
ent angles ( by hours, by home, by 
dav part, bv month, etc. I . color tv, 
network patterns and various break- 
downs of tv expenditures. 

Film & Tape Basics: Besides giv- 
ing the complete rundown of results 
from the 1st American Tv Commer- 
cials Festival & Forum, there will be 
a variety of facts and figures on syn- 
dications costs, users and producers, 
plus facts on tape and film. ^ 



sponsor • 4 JULY 1960 



TELEVISION (A Preview °f ' Air Media Basics) 

How television usage varies by months of the year, day and night 



Average hours viewing per tv home per tlay Percent tv homes watching per avg. minute 

MONTH DAILY HRS. (M-F) (ALL DAYS) 


May 1959 4 hrs. 31 min. 6 a.m.-6 p 


m 


13.2 6p 


m.-mid. 41.7 


June 1959 4 hrs. 17 min. 6 a.m.-6 p 


m 


14.0 6p 


m 


-mid. 38.3 


July 1959 4 hrs. 10 min. 6 a.m.-6 p 


m 


12.5 6 p 


m 


.-mid. 34.6 


Aug. 1959 4 hrs. 10 min. 7 a.m.-6 p 


m 


16.1 6 p 


m 


-1 a.m 


33.9 


Sept. 1959 4 hrs. 35 min. 7 a.m.-6 p 


m 


16.2 6 p 


m 


-1 a.m 


39.0 


Oct. 1959 5 hrs. 3 min. 7 a.m.-6 p 


m 


17.1 6p 


m 


-1 a.m 


44.7 


Nov. 1959 5 hrs. 25 min. 7 a.m.-6 p 


m 


18.0 6 p 


m 


-1 a.m 


47.0 


Dec. 1959 5 hrs. 31 min. 7 a.m. -6 p 


m 


18.8 6 p 


m 


-1 a.m 


46.9 


Jan. 1960 5 hrs. 59 min. 7 a.m.-6 p 


m 


21.5 6p 


m 


-1 a.m 


50.4 


Feb. 1960 5 hrs. 52 min. 7 a.m.-6 p 


m 


21.2 6 P 


m 


-1 a.m 


49.8 


Mar. 1960 5 hrs. 47 min. 7 a.m.-6 p 


m 


21.5 6 P 


m 


-1 a.m 


48.4 


Apr. 1960 5 hrs. 23 min. 7 a.m.-6 p 


m 


19.7 6 p.m.-l a.m. 45.7 


Source: Nielsen Tv Index 



How viewing differs in Eastern, Central, and Pacific time zones 



Viewing habits by hours vary great- 
ly in different time zones, as shown 
by ARB figures at right and below. 
This is particularly noticeable during 
the morning and late evening. Per- 
cent-of-homes figures cover hour be- 
ginning at time shown top of column 






ZONE 


Percent homes 

6 P M. 7 


using tv 

8 


by 


zones, 

9 


March, 

10 


1960 

11 


MID. 


Eastern 


40.8 


55.3 


64.3 




67.0 


52.2 


23.0 


12.4 


Central 


52.9 


61.3 


66.4 




59.4 


33.9 


17.3 


5.4 



Pacific 



ZONE 


Percent homes 

7 A.M. 8 


using tv 

9 


by zones 

10 


, March 


1960, 


Monday 

1 P.M. 


thru Friday dayt 

2 3 


me 

4 


5 


Eastern 


9.4 


17.7 


16.6 


15.0 


22.0 


25.2 


20.3 


20.3 


20.2 


27.9 


33.7 


Central 


9.0 


15.0 


16.2 


20.8 


21.2 


24.0 


19.6 


19.5 


22.0 


28.1 


32.6 


Pacific 


5.8 


8.2 


8.0 


10.2 


14.2 


17.5 


11.5 


10.6 


11.8 


16.3 


25.2 



Average viewing time, morning, afternoon and evening 



Average hours viewing per home per day by day part 



AFTERNOON 



TOTAL DAY 



Mon.-Fri. 


3 hrs. 32 min. 


1 hr. 38 min. 


43 m 


n. 


5 hrs. 53 ruin. 


Saturday 


3 hrs. 53 min. 


1 hr. 38 min. 


53 m 


n. 


6 hrs. 24 min. 


Sunday 


3 hrs. 32 min. 


1 hr. 49 min. 


20 m 


n. 


5 hrs. 41 min. 


All Days 


3 hrs. 35 min. 


1 hr. 39 min. 


41 m 


n. 


5 hrs. 55 min. 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



RADIO ' / '"'"" " ; ' '" ]lri1 "' Basics ') 

In-home listening level shows little change through year 



Average dailj boon listening per home by months of the year 





















































9 


1 92 ', oo 


i qs 








1.86 


1.89 


1.94 


1.83 


1.86 


1.8? 


l.JC | fi p 












l.b f 


1.66 




































































MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUG. 


SEPT. 


OCT. 


NOV. 


DEC. 


JAN. 


FEB. 



Independent 
stations captured 
bulk of all radio 
in-home listening time 
by last year 



-I bj \. <:. Ni.i- 

[or the ln-t time in 12 

• !• pendenl radio station* getting the 

portion oi daily listening boo 

dio in-home listening houra have Buffered a 

-in. .- 1947 with at 

• "i-li in. I. pendents dropped 

oorj 11%, 'I In- i- doe '" independent ra- 

"i.in half "f 'l.nly listening 
• 1947. 



\etwork affiliates versus independent stations 
April each year 



1947 1951 



50 33 

I 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



TIMEBUYING ( / ' '' em lew ; iir Media h '" si <s > 

The difference between a rating and a share of audience 



A. How to compute share of audience 


NIELSEN SHARE 
PROGRAM HOMES AVERAGE AUDIENCE OF AUDIENCE 
USING TV TO PROGRAM 

60.0 100.0 








2<X0 










- 






B. H< 


>w to use share to evaluate programs 




TREND OF 
NIELSEN TOTAL AUDIENCE RATING 


TREND OF 
AUDIENCE SHARE 


JANUARY JUNE 


JANUARY JUNE 






346 




SHARE* 31.2 




w 

1 

//// 




N.ft.% 


23.2 
















127 






w 










m 










m 




Share of audience is neces 
Ranger Show (formerly A 
decline during June, main 


sary to 
BC TV, 

ained a 


evaluate p 
Thursday 
high share 


rogram 
7:30-8 


jerformant 
p.m. ) , as i 


e during s 
ndicated a 


immer a 

)ove, al 


nd seasonal changes. The Lone 
hough suffering a severe rating 





SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 




HOWARD 

^ Tv wasn't even on the 
scene when he entered retail 
advertising over 30 years ago 

^ In five years with TvB he 
has helped huild S280 million 
tv hillings from Main Street 



In the last two months. Howard P. 
Abrahams, retail sales vice president 
for Television Bureau of Advertising, 
has been piling up air miles (more 
than 35.000) at the rate of a presi- 
dential aspirant. Results of his swing 
through the U.S.: at 17 sales clinics 
which he conducted for TvB. 867 tv 
station executives received a detailed, 
"how-to"" blueprint for selling tv to 
retail advertisers. 

Of TvB*s nearly 240 member sta- 
tions. 198 were represented at the 
clinics: in fact, it was at these sta- 
tions' request that the clinics were 
held. Now Abrahams and his TvB 
retail sales staff are at work in asso- 
ciation with the National Retail Mer- 
chants Association on a manual for 
retailers on how to use television. 

The gradual swell of interest both 
from stations and retailers in the me- 
dium leads Norman E. (Petel Cash, 
president of TvB to predict that bv 
1970 local advertisers in the U.S. will 
be investing SI. 5 billion annually in 
tv. Last year local advertisers showed 
their interest in tv to the tune of 
1280 million. 

It is more than coincidence that 
most of this interest has set in since 
1955 I a recent NRMA survey showed 
that two out of three retailers using 
tv today started since that yean, at 
which time TvB began the militant 
missionary program of spreading the 
tv story to local merchants. 

Late in 1955. with almost 30 
years of stead y employment in the re- 
tailing and retail advertisins busi- 



TALKING TURKEY: Howard Abrahams, TvB 
vice president of retailing, makes a point for 
tv advertising as the medium for local stores 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



ABRAHAMS: TvB'S RETAIL MAN 



ness behind him, 51-year-old Howard 
Abrahams decided to slow down the 
pace by becoming a consultant to a 
limited number of retailing accounts. 
One of his first assignments as a con- 
sultant was from Ollie Treyz, then 
president of TvB. It led to another, 
and another. "Why not just come to 
work for us?" Treyz suggested. Re- 
calls Abrahams, "I guess I was se- 
duced." At any rate, what started as 
a slow-down has turned into a speed- 
up for him. He joined TvB on 1 
January 1956 as director of retail 
sales, was elected vice president in 
November 1958. 

What are the problems which 
Abrahams has faced at TvB in pro- 
moting tv to retailers? First, there 
was something close to resignation on 
the part of many tv stations to the 
belief that department stores would 
always remain in the newspaper 
camp. Next, there was the convic- 
tion of many department stores and 
specialty shops that tv was not their 
medium, and even if it was, there was 
still confusion about how it could be 
used. 

'"Store advertising managers," 
Abrahams told sponsor, "had been 
print-indoctrinated. New people com- 
ing into store ad departments were 
trained by people who had been 
brought up in print. What's more, 
these new people had been trained in 
schools where they were not educated 
in line with other than print media." 
As a case in point, until 1959, one 
of the most widely-used retailing text- 
books — "Retail Advertising and Sales 
Promotion" ( Prentice -Hall) — had 
only three pages devoted to tv. To- 
day, the new edition contains a whole 
chapter on television — credited to 
Abrahams. 

The recent TvB clinics — plus a lot 
of previous missionary work among 
retailers — has been aimed at easing 
the problems. The station execs were 
advised to get to know more about a 
store operation. "There's no use try- 
ing to sell tv to a department store," 
Abrahams says, "unless you speak 
store language." 

Apparently many are beginning to 




TV EMPHASIS 

MWl[ $42,000- SPOTS J 

8,000 ■1 = i«_j == _JH \W 

I'JJjS! $2 1,000 -SHOw"! W 

5,000 ■ llPal ■■■^ 
i<m 

2,000 

1,000 

te Feb Mar Apr May Jm Jul tag Sip Oct Nov hi 






HH 



INVESTOR COURSE 



■cent TvB clinic, the chart above was one of many slides that 
demonstrate an imaginary presentation to an imaginary department store 
annual sales volume. He does not mind calling store promotion "publicity," 
$420,000 "publicity" budget, shows how to plan for $63,000 of it in tv 



CONSISTENCY: Another 
of department store sales 
points up how a store car 



slide from the same TvB clinic demonstrates the peaks and valleys 
through the year (line of demarcation in middle of chart) and 
plan to sell with tv with $42,000 schedule of spots and a $21,000 
that both follows the seasonal pushes and delivers year round 



1 1 


1 PLANNING YOUR TV 


INVESTMENT 


c<y 

TOTAL PUBLICITY TV 
EXPENSE 15% OF x $420,000 


I $12 MILLION 
I VOLUME 


Q 


a 




$420,000 


$63,000 ™ 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



learn. IT* Mini NRMA aurvej re- 
ferred I- before ahowa thai I '• of 
reUtlen queried are uaii 
Sutiona are beginning to learn re- 

i retailers are beginning to 
gel the hang of hot* to use t<-l<\ iaion. 

--. however, baa 1 »* -« - r i very 
graduaL One atore in •> market be- 
gina i" uae i^. < ompetitoi Btorea -ii 

I.. i. k .ni.l arati Ii f milts. W li«n the 

reaulta are well-proven, in thej come 

I ..i this reason, T\ B baa launched 
the Brat of .i aeriea of "teal laba foi 
tv." I \u- one i- tli<- Patterson Fletch- 
ei Store in Fori W .i\ ne, a men's Bpe- 
. iaJt) store h ith some women's and 



children's sofl goods added. This 
"lab" i- of interest, oot onhj t<> other 
men's apecialt) Bhops bul to all de- 
partment storea since, according to 
Uirahams, men's furnishings are the 
Becond highest profit department. 
I he No. I profit department of a 
Btore is women's foundation gar- 
ments. 

Siill another indication that local 
advertisers are becoming increasing- 
K curious about the new medium of 
h is that the National Retailers Mer- 
chants Vssociation has recently set 
ii|> a l<le\ ision committee. 

Behind the activitj are a number 
i Please mm to page 67 I 



HOW TO SELL TV TO RETAILERS 
—TIPS FROM THE TvB CLINICS 

MEDIA COMPARISON: Compare tv station and 
local newspaper circulations not only for the retail trading 
area counties but for perimeter counties to emphasize the 
du indling coverage of the newspapers in suburban areas. 



BASE PITCH TO BUDGET: Try to start a new 
stoic account in tv with at least 1.7 , of its annual over-all 
ad budget. Divide up this tr budget into two parts: (1) a 
year round buy of a tv news show, for example, and (2) 
announcements for important sales events and seasons. 



RECORD KEEPING: Get store ad dept. to keep a 
scrap book oj its tv commercials {scripts and rough story- 
boards). This is similar to keeping files of print ads. 



MILKING THE GLAMOR: Get store to tie in 

all other advertising efforts such as newspapers, direct mail 
and window or aisle displays with its tv advertising. Thus 
the\ can tale advantage of the glamor of television. 



HELP WITH COMMERCIALS: Remind ad 

managers that three items featured in any 60-second an- 
nouncement are plenty, llso it is a good idea to prepare 
teriea oj film, tape or slide intros for commercials that are 
geared to special store events throughout rear: these may 

■ < out Is. leaving 10 .seconds for showing Items. 



:;':::"!;!:: : ::,:":": : iiiimii 



NIGHTTIME NEARS 
100 % SELLOUT ON 
COLUMBIA RADIO 

bm! ight radio, in spite of the fre- 
quent cynical comments about it, con- 
tinues to produce its share of bright 
spots in the air media picture. 
Case in point: WMSC. Atlanta, which 
at SPONSOR presstime, had sold <)<>', 
of its night hours, with the remaining 
10'/ practically in the bag. Here's 
how they did it. 

Originally operating from a drive- 
in restaurant, the station decided to 
go it alone, when some two months 
ago it changed its music format in the 
7 p.m. to 12 midnight period from a 
Top 40 to popular album type. Time 
was sold in minimum segments of 
quarter hours, priced at about 60% 
of normal daytime rates. While this 
represents slightly over 25% of the 
station's broadcast day. in terms of 
gross revenue it will yield a sizeable 
209? when completely sold out. 

Night hours from Monday through 
Friday, consist of two programs — 
Mostly Music (7-10 p.m.) and Late 
Date (10:30 p.m. -midnight) which 
are handled on alternate nights by 
two young, but solid air personali- 
ties, Bill Brown and Al Newman. 
I One music program. 7 p.m.-l a.m. 
comprises the Saturdav night fare.) 

Placing a 15-minute segment limi- 
tation, "firmly establishes sponsor 
identity and enables commercials to 
become part of rather than a 'break' 
in the program." says president and 
general manager Wallv Martin, add- 
ing that further identity is sustained 
by both d.j.'s who call every sponsor 
and air most commercials from fact 
sheets for an authentic and personal 
touch. 

Variety of sponsors include drug- 
stores, restaurants, a shopping center. 
, beer distributor, and miniature golf 
. course, all of whom rely chiefly on 
the personality of both d.j.'s plus the 
. appeal-to-all-age group music format. 
j And while night rates appear to differ 
\ considerably from those of daytime, 
"it pays off pretty quickly," says 
\\ ally Martin, anticipating that "20% 
i of gross revenue practically in the 
j palm of our hand." ^ 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



TV BASICS/JULY 



Network tv's 'qualitative' picture 



^ Latest Trendex audience figures summarize program 
selectivity, frequency of viewing, sponsor identification 



W 



ith the network tv season now 
in the history books, admen are re- 
viewing the qualitative data which 
emerged from audience figures. 

Here are some of these summaries, 
as provided in Trendexs last report 
covering the late winter: 

• Quiz and panel shows are, sur- 
prisingly, viewed most regularly. 

• Varietv-comedv- music formats 



have the highest sponsor identifica- 
tion. 

• Women still tend to select the 
majority of tv programs. 

The Trendex figures, done only in 
competitive markets, provide a deep- 
er glimpse of the tv audience than 
usually afforded by ratings. 

These are among the highlights: 

Program selectivity: Women 



choose, in order of preference, quiz 
and panel, half hour dramas, variety- 
comedy-music, hour dramas, and situ- 
ation comedies. Teens are not a 
prominent factor in program selec- 
tion. Nor are children, except for 
situation comedies. 

Frequency of viewing: Seventy- 
four percent viewed quiz and panel 
shows regularly. Westerns and situa- 
tion comedies tied for second place 
(66%). 

Sponsor identification: Sixty-eight 
percent of the people could identify 
variety-comedy-music. Mystery, ad- 
venture and western fared lowest. ^ 



1. THIS MONTH IN NETWORK TV 



Political conventions: network time schedules, costs, sponsors 

The tv networks, during the two weekly periods of 11 July and 25 July, will devote at least a total of 120 hours covering 
the two political conventions. CBS TV sold its $6 million package to Westinghouse (Ketchum, M&G). NBC TV sold sixths, 
at $600,000 each, to B. F. Goodrich (BBDO). Broivn & Williamson (Bates), Upton Tea <SSCB), and Field Enterprises 
[KM&J) and a twelfth to Cowles Magazines (Look), Inc. (McCann) . ABC TV, asking $500,000 for a sixth, at presstime 
sold a twelfth to 20th Century-Fox (Chas. Schaifer) and one participation to Du Pont (BBDO) .Below, the time schedules: 



DEMOCRATIC 


CONVENTION ABC TV 


CBS TV 


NBC TV 


3 July, Sun. 


5-5:30 p.m., Convention Preview 






9 July, Sat. 


10:30-11 p.m., Convention City 




9:30-10:30 p.m., 

Convention Preview 


10 July, Sun. 


7-7-30 p.m.. These Are The Men 


6-6-30 p.m., Preview 





11 July 


Mon. 


8 p.m.-12 mid. 


8 p.m.-12 mid. 


8 p.m.-12 mid. 


12 July, 


Tues. 


7-11 p.m. 


7 p.m.-l a.m. 


7 p.m.-l a.m. 


13 July, 


Wed. 


6-11 p.m.; 1-3 a.m. 


6-11 p.m. 


6 p.m.-2 a.m. 


14 July, 


Thurs. 


3-9 p.m.; 11 p.m.-2 a.m. 


7-11 p.m. 


6-11 p.m. 


15 July, 


Fri. 


10-11:30 p.m. 


10-12 mid. 


9 p.m.-12 mid. 



REPUBLICAN CONVENTION 


23 July, Sat. 


10:30-11 p.m., Convention City 






9:30-10:30 p.m., 

Convention Preview 


24 July, Sun. 


7-7:30 p.m., These Are The Men 


6-6:30 p.m. 






25 July, Mon. 


11 a.m.-12 N ; 8 p.m.-12 mid. 


11 a.m.-2 p 

8:30-11:30 


a.m. 


11 a.m.-2 p.m., 
8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. 


26 July, Tues. 


8 p.m.-12 mid. 


8:30-11:30 


p.m. 


8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. 


27 July, Wed. 


8 p.m.-12 mid. 


8:30-11:30 


p.m. 


8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. 



28 July, Thurs. 



i p.m.-12 mid. 



8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



2. NIGHTTIME 



C O M P A Rl 



■ SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Meet The Prcsi 

Manhattan Hhlrti 
Daniel A 

Charles I 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



D. Edwards 
Am. Home 
(Bates) 



Overland Trail 



John Daly News 



No net servici 
Edwards 



(repeat feed) 



John Daly News 
Conventii 



Dennis The 



Overland Tiail 



ston (Card.) 
m. Chicle 



Kate Smith 
Show 

Am. Home 
(Rates) 



7:30-8:30) 
Jrn A Wmsn 
n Mills (DFS) 
Pont (BBDO) 
W-F $82,000 



Laramie 
(7:30-8:30) 

Philip Mortis 



oliate (Bate*) 
I Kodak (JOT) 
I. $85,800 



(YAR) 
P&O (BAB) 
Conventionj 



(Burnett) 
Convention! 



Riverboat 

Conventionj 

(7/11; 8-12) 



Music For i 
Summer Nigl 
Convention; 



Whitehall 
(Rate*) 



Bourbon St. Beat 
8:30-9:30) 

(Bates) 

$80,500 



Lerer (,1WT) alt 
Scott UWT) 
:-F $39,000 

Conventii 



Wells Fargo 
Amer Tobacco 
(SSC&B) alt 
P&G (B&B) 
V-F $47.00 
Convention 
(7/2.5: 8:30- 
12M1 



Peter Cunn 
Bristol-Myeri 
(DCSAS) lit 
It J. Reynold! 
(Esty) 
My-F »38.00i 



Wyatt Earp 


Dobie Cillis 


Oen Mllli (DFS) 


PUIibury 


alt P&G 


(Burnett) 




alt 


Alberto Culver 


Philip Morris 




(Burnett) 


W-F $40,000 


Sc-F $37.00 



Cas Co. Playhse 

(LAX) 
Dr-F $14.00 

alt wks 
NBC Playhousi 



Ozzie Cr Harri 
Kodak (JWT 
Quaker (JWT 

Sc-F 



Bourbon St. Beat 
lolds Metal 
(LAN) 
nl (BBDO) 



Danny Thomas 

(BAB) 
Sc-F $47,500 

Talent Scouts 

(SR)t (8/1 S) 



The Rifleman 

Miles Lab 

(Wade) 

PAG (BAB) 

W-F $38,000 



Tightrope 

;o. (Parkson) 



Carter (Bates I 
Whitehall 

(Bates) 
My-F $80.51 



Hitchcock 

Presents 

Bristol Myers 

(TAR) 

My F $39.0*0 



Ann Southern 

Gen Foods 

(BAB) 

k-F $40,000 

Spike Jones 

Show 

(SR)t (8/1 S) 



Akoa-Coodyi 

Theater 
Alcoa (FSR) al 
Goodyear (TAR1 
Dr-F | 



\rmour (FC&B) 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

BrnAW (Bates) 



Comedy Spot 
Pet Milk 
(Gardner) 



Arthur Murray 
Sterling (DFS) 



Am. Chicle 
(Bates) 

Har Ritchie 
(KAE) 



The Alaskans 
I 



Connecticut 



Alcoa Presents 

Alcoa (FSB) 
Dr-F $35,000 



(Bates) 

Miles (Wade) 

(10-soncl) 

Sp-L $35,(i 



I Johnny Stjccatt 



Q I. 131.000 



DuPont (BBDO) 
Dr-F $44,000 



No Net Service 
Convention! 
^7 86; B 12) 



Wed. Night 
Fights 

Convention! 
17/13; 1-3 a 



- do not Include sustaining, paivicipat- 

• ■ refer to average show costs including 

laUnl Hi production. They are cross (include 15% agency commission) 



They do not include eommercimU or time charges. This chart covers period 

1 July- 31 July. Program types are indicated as follows: (A) Adventure, 
<Au^ Audience Participation, (C) Comedy. (D) Documentary, (Dr) 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



* 


G 


R 


A 


P 


4 JULY -31 JULY 


EDNESDAY 

CBS NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAYfl. 

ABC CBS NBC 


SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 1 


ventiont 
.3; 6-11) 


Convention? 

(7/13; 6-2 am) 


Convention! 
(7/14; 3-9 pm) 




Conventiont 
(7/14; 6-11) 






Conventiont 

(7/15; 9 am- 

12 mid) 






























Edwards 

oma (Bates) 

rter (DFS) 

$9.500tt 


News 

Teiaeo (C&W) 
N-L $6.500tt 


(Bates) 
alt Philip Morris 

£LL »a.500tt 


Texaco (C&W) 
V-L $6.500tt 


D Edwards 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

(Bates) 


Teiaeo (C&W) 
N-L $6.500tt 


et service 
ventiont 

; 7-1 am) 






No net service 
Conventiont 

(7/14; 7-11) 






No net service 


No net service 








. Carter 
eat feed) 


News 


John Daly News 


D Edwards 

Philip Morris 
(repeat feed) 


(repeat feed) 


John Daly New 


D Edwards 

Parliament 

alt Amer. Home 


(reported) 


ckoning 

30-8:30) 
er. Home 
Bates) 
(MeDann) 
$18,000 


Wagon Train 

(7:30-8:30) 

Ford (JWT) 

W-F $78,000 


Steve Canyon 


Invisible Man 


Law of The 
Plainsman 
Amer. Tob. 

(SSCB) 

P&G (B&B) 

Midas Muffler 

(Weiss) 

Sterling (DFS) 


Walt Disney 

Presents 

(7:30-8:30) 

Hill (Ayer) 

A-L $94,000 


Rawhide 

(7:30-8:30) 

(EWRR) 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

Hamm (C-M) 


Cimarron City 


Dick Clark 

Show 

Beech- Nut 

Life Saver* 

(T&B) 

Mu-L $14,500 


Perry Masen 

(7:30-8:30) 

Colgate (Bate*) 

(B&B) 
My-F $80.00( 


Bonanza 
(7:30-8:30) 
Gen. Foods 
(FC&B) 
DuPont (BBDO) 
W-F $78,000 


ckoning 
ventiont 
26; 8:30- 
11:30) 


Wagon Train 

K. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

Natl Blsc. 

(Mc-E) 


Donna Reed 
Campbell 
(BBDO) 

Johnson & J 

(T&R) 

Sc-F $38,000 


Playhouse of 
Stars 

Conventiont 

(7/28; 8:30- 

11:30) 


Bat Masterson 

Hill Bros. 
(West Coaat) 
SV-F $38,000 


Walt Disney 

Canada Dry 
(Mathea) 


Rawhide 

Pream (B&B) 
Nabisco (Me-B) 

(EWRR) 
Mutual of Omaha 
(Bozell & Jacobs) 


Cimarron City 


John Gunther's 

High Road 
Ralston (GB&B) 
Dr-F $31,000 


Perry Mason 
Sterling (DFS) 
Hamm (C-M) 


Bonanza 
segs open 


nto Space 

SBDO) 

figer Sewing 

. (T&B) 

$38,000 


Price Is Right 
Lever (OBM) 
alt Speldel 
(NC&K) 
T. $21 sno 
Convention! 


The Real 

P&O (Comphm) 

Se-F $39,000 

Conventiont 

(7/28; S-12) 


Johnny Ringo 

S. C. Johnson 

(NLB) alt 

P. Lorlllard 

(LAN) 

W-F $36,000 


Producers' 

Bris. -Myers 
(T&B) 

alt 
B. J. Beynolds 

(Esty) 
Dr-F $11,000 


Man From 
Blackhawk 
Xliles (Wade) 

alt 

R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

W-F $38,006 


Hotel D'Paree 
Carter (SSCB) 

L&M (DFS) 
W-F $43,000 


Wichita Town 


Leave It To 
Beaver 

Ralston (Gardner. 

GB&B) 
Sc-F $30.00( 


Wanted Dead 

or Alive 
Rrn & WmaoB 

(Bates) 
Kimberly-Clark 

(FC&B) 
W-F $39,001 


Man&Challeng* 

B. J. Beynolds 

(Eaty) alt 

Chematrand 

(DDB) 

A-F $38, 00 1 


Millionaire 

te (Batei) 
$42,000 


Happy 

Kraft (JWT) 
3c-F $23,000 


Jeannie Carson 


Zane Grey 
S. C Johnson 

(B&B) 

General Foods 

(OBM) 

SV-F $45,000 


achelor Father 
Whitehall 
(Bates) 

fc-F $42,000 


77 Sunset Strip 

(9-10) 

Am. Chicle 

My-F $86,000 


Video Village" 

P&G (B&B) 

Au-L $5,000 


Play Your 


Lawrence Welk 

(9-10) 
Dodge (Grant) 
Mu-L $45,000 


Mr. Lucky 
Lever (OBM) 
alt Bm & Wmsr 

(Bates) 
A-F $43.00( 


The Deputy 

Kellogg(Burnett) 

alt 

Gen Cigar 

(T&B) 

W-F $8».O0C 


» Cot • 
Secret 

Ida (Bat*) 

DCSS) 

$37,000 


Tate 

Kraft (JWT) 
EV-F $21,000 


Untouchables 
(9:30-10:30) 
Armour (FCB) 
L&M (Mc-E) 
DuPont (BBDO) 
My-F $80,000 


Markham 

Schlitz (JWT) 

alt Renault 

(Kudner) 

>ty-F $39,000 


Wrangler 
Ford (JWT) 

Y-F $23,000 


77 Sunset Strip 

H. Ritchie 

(K&E) 

R J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

Whitehall 


December Bride 
Sc-F $32,000 


Masquerade 
Party 

(Grey) 
Q-L $18,000 


Lawrence Welk 


Have Cun. Wil 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

alt Lever (JWT) 

W-F $40,000 


Project 20 


Steel Hr 

*«» 10-11) 
9. Steel 
JBDO) 

$80,000 


This Is Your 

Life 
P&G (B&B) 
-L $52,000 


Untouchables 

Ritchie (K&E) 
Carnation 
(EWRR) 


TBA 

(SR)f 


You Bet Your 
Life 

J. B. Williams 
y>. (Parkson) alt 
Lever (BBDO) 
)-L $53,000 


Robert Taylor 

starring in 

The Detectives 

P&G 

(B&B) 

My-F $45,000 


Twilight Zone 
"■m Food (T&B) 

(FCB) 
V-F $36,000 


Moment of Fear 

(10-11) 

Lever (SSCB) 

My-F $28,000 


Jubilee. U.S.A. 

Massev- Ferguson 

(NL*B> 

Polk Miller 

(Ayer) 

Mu-L $20,000 


Gunsmoke 

L&M (DFS) alt 

Sperry-Rand 

(T&R) 

W-F $42,000 


Project 20 


e Theatre 
»ke 10-11) 

mstrong 
SBDO) 

$80,000 


People Are 

Block (Ray 

llenbrook (DFS) 
IF $24,000 


Take Good Look 
Dutch Masters 
Clgara (EWRK) 

Q-L $36,000 
Conventiont 

(7/14; 11-2 am) 


To Tell The 
Truth 

H. Curtis 

McClinton) 
1-L $22,000 


*lo Net Service 

Conventiont 

(7/28; 8:30- 

12:30) 


"Black Saddle 

Carter (Bates) 

Chevrolet 

(Camp-E) 

Alberto Culver 

Conventiont 
(7/15; 10-11:30) 


Person to Person 

Carter (SSCB) 

alt All State 

(Burnett) 

I-L $000 

(eratis) 

Conventiont 

(7/15; 10-12) 


Moment of Fear 


Jubilee. U.S.A. 

Convention 

Citvt 

10:30-11) 


No net service 
Miss Universe 
(7/9; 10:30-12) 

VI. $45, 


Man From 
Interpole 

Sterling (DFS) 
A -F $25.00( . 



Comedy, (Sp) Sporta, (V) Variety, (W)' Western. tNo charge for repeats 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 




reason 
why 



SPONSOR 



tops all 
im partial broadcast 
trade paper 
surveys of 
agency /advertiser 
readership 



six out of 

every ten copies of 

SPONSOR 

go to 

readers 

who buy 

or influence 

the buying of 

radio/tv time. 

SPONSOR 

is written 
for them, 
through 

SPONSOR 

they get 
what they need 
to keep fully 
posted every week. 




DAYTIME 



C O 



P A F 

























10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 
11:00 
11:15 
11:30 


SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


[ 
ABII 




Limp Unfe My 
Feet 






Red Rowe 


Dough Re Mi 




Red Rowe 


Dough Re Mi 






Look Up Li»e 






On The Co 


Play Your 

Itrn. & Wmsn. 
alt Whitehall 




On The Co 

.T B. Williams 
Co. alt sust 


Play Your 
Hunch 

Sterling alt 
Colgate 




J. B. William" 
Co. alt «ust 


Colgate 




FYI 




Convention 
(J 25; ll-12i 


1 Love Lucy 

I-fver alt sust 

Convention 


Price ll Right 

Sterilnc 

lit Whitehall 




1 Love Lucy 

Gen. Mills lit 


Price Is Right 






Cimcrj Three 






December Bride 


Concentration 

Culver alt 

I*ver 

Mcnncn alt Lever 




December Bride 


Concentration 

Frte-ldalre 
Alberto Culver 






alt Toni 


12N 
12:15 
12:30 
12:45 
1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 
2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 
3:00 
3:15 
3:30 
3:45 
4:00 
4:15 
4:30 
4:45 
5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 








Restless Cun 


Lovt of Life 

alt nut 

Amer Home Prod 


Truth or 

Consequences 

Miles 

PAO 


Restless Cun 


Love of Life 

Geo. Mllla 


Truth or 
Consequences 

Nabisco alt sust 
Culver alt sust 


Restless 

'imoniz, 11 


Johns Hopkins 
File 7 






Love That Bob 
Ex-Lax. Johnson 


Search for 
Tomorrow 

pao 


It Could Be You 

PAG alt sust. 


Love That Bob 

Beech-Nut. Min. 

Maid, Toni, 

Hills Bros. 


Search For 

Tomorrow 

PAO 


It Could Be You 

Miles alt sust 


Love Thai,. 
Alberto-O 
Drackett. 
Lever. St< 
'onds. Wi 


Cuiding Light 
PAG 


Cuiding Light 


sust 


College News 
Conference 






About Faces 


No net service 


No net service 

Convention 
(7/25: 11-2 pm) 


About Faces 

Hills Bros. 


No net service 


No net service 


About F 

S. C. Jol 
Gen. M 


News 

(1:»-1:S») 


News 
(1:1»-1J») auat 




Baseball Came 






•Vorld Turns 

pao 

Nabisco lit 
Camatlen 


No net service 




World Turns 

PAO 
(Merlins alt 


No net service 




of Week 
(pirtic) (1:45- 


Frontiers of 
Faith 




Baseball 


TBA 


Day In Court 

Ponds. Sterling. 
Whitehall 


For Better Or 
For Worse 


Queen for a 


Day In Court 

Toni. J.4J., 
Siraoniz. S. C. 
Johnson, B-Nut 


For Better Or 
For Worse 


Queen for a 
Day 


Day In C 

Ex-Lax, I 

Vhitehall, 

Johnso 




Baseball 


Major League 
Baseball 
Bam* M 

Buien '■:• 
regional 


C*le Storm 


Art Linkletter 

.1. TV Williams 


Loretta Young 


Gale Storm 

Sterling. Renuzit 


Art Linkletter 
Scott 
alt Tool 
K.lloM 


Loretta Young 


Cale St. 

Drackett. 
illn. Mild 
-ax. J&J, 

Johns i 


P&G 


Open Hearing 




Major League 
Baseball 


Beat The Clock 

Min Maid Ar- 

nour, Beech-Nut. 

Bx-Lai 


Millionaire 
Collate 


Young 
Dr Malone 

Block alt sust 


Beat The Clock 

Lever. J&J. 

Beech-Nut 

S. C. Johnson 


Millionaire 


Dr. Malone 

Proctor Elee. 

Plough 

Sterling alt 

P&G (7/12 S) 


Beat The 
J&J. An 

5taley, Dri 
S. C. Joh 






Baseball 


Who You Trust? 

LeTer. Armour 
11 Nut, J&J 


Verdict Is Vours 

K>so alt. sust 

ill H. Curtis 


From These 
Roots 


Who Do You 
Trust? 

Ex-Lax, Ponds 

Whitehall 
S. C. Johnson 


/eretict Is Yours 
Scott lit Toni 


From These 
Roots 


Vho You } 

Fds. E»- 

J&J, T: 

Lever. D- 




PCA Coif 


Major League 
Baseball 


American 
Bandstand 


Brighter Day 
PAO 


Comedy Theatre 


American 
Bandstand 

Welch. Lever. 
Gen. Mills 


Brighter Day 
PAO 


Comedy Theatre 


Bandsta 

Vrmour, T'l 
Polk Mi 


Secret Storm 
Amer Bona Prod 


Secret Storm 
0*n VOlls 






tournament 




Amer. Band. 


Edge of Night 
PAD 

H Curtis alt 
S. C. Johnson 


Adventure Thea. 


Amer. Band. 
Toni. Hollywood 
Candy. Northam 

War.. Plough 


Edge of Night 
PAO 
Sterilnc 

lit 


Adventure Thea. 
■us 


Amer. B, 
Mills. li 
Tick Ch.i 


Mjtfys Fundi? 


Face the Nation 


World Chimp. 
Coif 


American 
Bandstand 

ea-ap 






American 
Bandstand 






Bandstai 


0«n MIIU 


College Bowl 
Gen Kifdrlc 


No Net Service 


Captain Callant 
Crn. Milk 






Rocky His 

Gen Mills 
Kool Aid 






My Fris 

Flicka 

Gen. K 

Kool A 

























HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 
NETWORK TELEVISION 

COM PARAGRAPH 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages (46, 47) 
includes regularly scheduled programing from 4 July to 
31 July, include (with possible exception of changes 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly sched- 



URAPH 



4 JULY -31 JULY 



DNESDAY 

BS NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


Rowe 


Dough Re Mi 




Red Rowe 


Dough Re Mi 




Red Rowe 


Dough Re Mi 


H 


eckle & leckle 

Gen. Mills 


Howdy Doody 

Oootlaantal 
Baking 




Block Drug 




Nabisco 


ie Co 


Play Your 
Hunch 

Coty (7/16 S) 




On The Co 


Play Your 
Hunch 

Colgate 




On The Co 


Play Your 

Colgate alt sust 


1 


Eighty Moust 


Ruff & lead, 
Gen Fee* 




Colgate alt 
■urt 




Miles alt 
Heinz 


J. B. Wms. alt 


Lucy 


Price Is Right 

Frigldalra 

alt Sterling 

leinz alt Culrer 




1 Love Lucy 

V. S. Steel alt 


Price Is Right 

Lever alt sust 

Mile* alt 




1 Love Lucy 

Lever alt sust 


>nce Is Right 

Lever alt sust 
Culver alt sust 




Lone Ranger 

Cm Mills 


Fury 
Gen Poods 


— 


Gerber alt 


er Bride 


Concentration 

Miles 




)ecember Bride 


Concentration 

alt Lever 
Heinz alt 
Whitehall 




lecember Bride 


Concentration 
tfiles alt Lever 

Lever alt 
Brn & Wmsn 




1 Love Lucy 3 


Circus Boy 

lies alt Nestle 


nta 


Nablseo alt 

Brlllo 




Nestle alt sust 


f LIU 

Milk 


Truth or 

Consequences 

Helm 


Restless Cun 

Drackett, Hill. 
S. C. Johnson 


Love of Life 
Amer Hon* 


Truth or 
Consequences 

PftG 


Restless Cun 

S. C. Johnson 

Drackett 


Love of Life 

Lever 
Gen Mills alt 


Truth or 
Consequences 




Sky King 

Nabisco 


True Story 
Sterling Drug 


me Prod 


P&G alt 


h For 
rrow 
AG 


Could Be You 
Whitehall alt 

'.octor Elec. 


Love That Bob 

rroour, Sterling 
Drackett. Min. 
Maid, Toni. 


Search for 

Tomorrow 

PftO 


It Could Be 

You 

Mile* alt 

PAO 


ove That Bob 

^eech-Nut. J&J 
enuzit. Drack- 


Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 

Guiding Light 


Could Be You 

Frigidaire 
alt sust 
P&G alt 




1 


etective Diary 
Sterling Drug 


I Light 

to 


Guiding Light 
PAG 


service 


No net service 


About Faces 

Ex-Lax. Ponds, 
S. C. Johnson 


4o net service 


No net service 


About Faces 
S. C. Johnson 


No net service 


*lo net service 


Mo net service 


aturday News 


Mr. Wiiard 


301 lOit 


News 

1:15-1:50) suit 


Turns 
M 


No net service 




As the World 
Turns 
PftO 

PllUbury 


No net service 




World Turns 
PftG 

Gen Mills 
It Stand. Brands 


■Jo net service 








tter Or 
Worse 


Queen for a 
Day 


Day In Court 
'oni. Gen. Fds, 
.ever. Drackett, 
J&J, S. C. 


For Better Or 
For Worse 

Toni alt sust 
Lever alt sust 


Queen-Day 

sust alt Heinz 


Day In Court 
Lever. Armour 
Drackett. Toni 
Reech-Nut. Ex- 


For Better Or 

For Worse 
Lever alt sust 


Queen for a 
Day 

Nabisco alt sust 
Culver alt sust 


1 


Jaseball Came 

of Week 
alstaff. Colgate 

Gen Mills 




nkletter 


Loretta Young 

Nestle alt sust 
Frigidaire alt 


Cale Storm 

Hackett. Lever, 
J&J 


Art Linkletter 

Lever alt sust 
Plllibury 


Loretta Young 
alt P&G 


Gale Storm 
onds. J&J, Min. 
Maid, Slmoniz 


Art Linkletter 
Bauer ft Black 


Loretta Young 




p-L iH.uOO.uBo* 






P&G alt sust 


loover 


Heinz alt P&G 


■it* 


Young 
Dr. Malone 

Plough, B&W, 
Heinz. Jergens 


ieat The Clock 
Johnson ft J.. 


Millionaire 

Stand. Brands 


Dr. Malone 

illles alt Culver 
P&G (7/14 S) 


leaf The Clock 
leech-Nut, Lever 

Ponds 


Millionaire 
Colfate 


Dr. Malone 
Coty (7/8 S) 
alt Mennen 








Is Yours 


From These 
Roots 

Brn. & Wmsn. 


Vho You Trust? 

Lever, B-Nut. 


Verdict Is Yours 
Amer. Home 


From These 
Roots 

Lever iL 7 J) 
alt sust 


Who Do You 
Trust? 

Drackett. Ponds 
Stale?. Beech - 
Tut. S. C. John- 


Verdict Is Yours 

Gen Mills 
alt sust 


.•abisco (7/8 S) 
From These 








to av £ 


omedy Theatre 


American 
Bandstand 

.ever. Gen Mills 
leech-Nut. Welch 


Brighter Day 
PftG 


lomedy Theatre 


Amer. Band. 

Mills, Lever, 
oni, Polk Miller 


Brighter Day 
PftG 


omedy Theatre 


Natl-.Amer. 

eague Baseball 

Gillette 

Ip-L $2, 750,000- 






ne Prod 


Secret Storm 

Item. Rand 


Secret Storm 
tnur Home Prod 


sust 


f Night 
kO / 
Ilk alt 


dventure Thea. 


wood Candy 

Ame. Band. 

lough. Northam- 


Edge of Night 

PftG 

Plllibury 


kdventure Thea. 


Amer. Band. 
Vrmour, Alberto 
Culver. Plough 


Edge of Night 
PftG 


Adventure Thea. 












American 
Bandstand 

Convention! 






American 
Bandstand 








PGA Golf 
Tournament 

(7/23; 5-6) 
Pah St (KAE) 
Wmsn. -Dickie 








Rocky and 
His Friends 
Gen Mills 






Rin Tin Tin 
Kool-Ald 








iL $180,000 





♦These are package prices and include time, talent, production and cable cost 

tiled programs appearing during this period are listed 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 
grams not listed are: Tonight, NBC, 11:15 p.m.-l a.m., 
Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday News 



Special. CBS, Sunday, 11-11:15 p.m.; Today, NBC, 7-9 
a.m., Monday-Friday, participating; News CBS, 7:45-8 a.m. 
and 8:45-9 a.m., Monday-Friday. All time periods are 
Daylight Saving. 



As broadcasting becomes more complex, SPONSOR ASKS: 



What makes a good station rep 



John Blair, 

• presents- 

• n in tin- radio am) tele- 
\i-i.in business, Do4 <>nlv in \>u v ork 
hut in "thcr major advertising cen- 
ters. In m\ opinion, the difference 
,M«1 an out- 
standing one is primarilj a matter of 
red interest in his job, enthusiasm 
and the willingness to work a little 
harder than hi- competitor. 



& 



Gregariousness, 
knowledge of 

his product. 



Incentives, however, -hould be 

given bj tin- firm he works for. for 

this i- helpful in developing the quali- 

tie- mentioned above. I5\ incentives, 

I mean that a major -hare of hi> in- 

Bhould ao rue to him through 

the conunission route -profit shar- 

: rut he ha- the feeling that a* 

the companj grows, he also partici- 

• it- growth and reward? — 

and if possible, a stock interest, which 

■nan the feeling of ownership 

plus the added -e. uritv that it brings, 

I think it i- taken for granted that 
an able salesman should he a gregari- 
pe that like- people, enjoys 
their company, know- bis product ex- 
• i!l\ well and i- backed op l>\ 
all of Hi,- do essarj research and sales 
development material needed to con- 
lie— ,,f wheth- 
er it is bugi 

■{ dif- 

; salesman and 

- perhaps onrj 

1"' - . Hut this \erv importanl 1'f , . 

.1- I have stated above, i- the resull 

itural enthusiasm for hi- job 

and the willingness to work harder 



Nick Imbornone, timebuyer, McCann- 

Ericksoa, In,.. Sew York 

\-ide from the obvious qualities 

an] good salesman must possess i i.e. 

sonality, quick 

thinking, etc.) the media salesman 

must also have the following: 

1. A good media background. 
Knowledge of the development of me- 
dia plans and goals are invaluable to 
the media salesman since it gives him 
a basic understanding of the prob- 
lems involved in buying, and thus he 
can more easily cope with problems 
arising from media decisions. 

2. A good research background. 
Research, always an important fac- 
tor in media, has become even more 
so in the past years with the increase 
in the number and types of studies 
taken. The good media salesman has 
enough background in research so 
that he is aware of the problems of 
reach, frequency and penetration. 

3. A desire to work. Unfortunate- 
ly, too many media salesmen confuse 
good salesmanship with good person- 
ality traits alone. There is no substi- 
tute for hard work and service. 

4. An understanding of the buyer's 
problems. In buying media many 
problems exist which apparently 
many salesmen are not aware of. 
Every account has its own individual 
media requirements and it's up to the 
salesman to know and understand 
these requirements and at all times 
he prepared to fulfill them. 

5. Complete media and marketing 
information. A good media salesman 
should ha\e or be able to get in a 
-hort time all marketing and media 
facts pertinent to the market or mar- 
ket- he represents. This not only 



Both a media 
and research 
background 
(an help 
tremendously 




helps the buyer in making decisions 
more quickly but helps build confi- 
dence in the minds of the people 
whom he is dealing with. 

In summary then, a media sales- 
man should not be a "peddler." He 
must be a well-rounded media man 
possessing all the qualities of a good 
salesman plus a strong media and 
research background, a desire to 
work, and understanding of the 
buyers problems, and a complete 
knowledge of his markets. 

Robert E. Eastman, president. Robert 
E. Eastman & Co.. Inc.. Xeu York 

A good rep salesman is made, not 
born. It is training that counts. 

There are certain fundamental re- 



L 



good salesman 
is not born. 



training is 
necessary 



quirements for skillful national sell- 
ing which can readily be inculcated 
into a reasonably intelligent and en- 
thusiastic man. Of course, you are 
ahead of the game if this man has 
either had previous experience in 
sales, advertising agencv. or station. 
The necessary sales elements for a 
good rep salesman are as follows: 

1. Imagination. Some of this may 
be native but more can be stimulated 
through feeding him ideas and show- 
ing him how they make more sales. 

2. Organization. He must keep 
and use records so that he is on top 
of everything all the time. 

3. knowledge of product. He can 
never know too much about his prod- 
uct. He should also know everything 
he can about competitive products. 

4. knowledge of his customers. 
Knowing and anticipating the likes 
and dislikes of each buyer is extreme- 
ly important in slanting a sales pres- 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



salesman? 



entation to get the order. Knowledge 
of the marketing aims of the adver- 
tiser is a "must." 

5. Understanding semantics. Care- 
fully chosen words can trigger the 
sale; the use of the wrong words can 
kill a sale just as quickly. 

6. Preparation. There is no sub- 
stitute for thorough preparation with 
full documentation of the case. 

All of the foregoing elements can 
be trained into a man in direct rela- 
tion to his power to absorb and re- 
tain. But selling is a complex thing 
deeply involved in psychology and 
philosophy and it may cause distor- 
tion to oversimplify. 

If you know of a man receptive to 
this type of training and in addition 
loaded with drive, persistence, and an 
appetite for hard work — let me know, 
we'd like to hire him. 

Merrill Grant, media buyer, Benton & 
Bowles, Inc., New York 
A good television salesman will 
represent not only the broadcast fa- 
cilities of each station on his list, 
but in fact, the station's programing 
image. He will bring to the potential 
advertiser not only a phvsical set of 
avai'ab'litie=. but rather a qualitative 




L 



Technique not 
as important to 
a rep salesman 
as a sharp an- 
alytical mind 



analysis of each spot he offers — and 
set these analyses in the confines of 
market and product characteristics. 

Due to the time pressures that ac- 
company the purchase of most spot 
campaigns, buving decisions must be 
made quickly. Thus, it would be 
naive as well as impractical to ex- 
pect a written, detailed analysis of 
each spot availabilitv. The ideal so- 
lution may be reached, however, when 
I Please turn to page 67) 



you've Got to Head jjtn the finish Line 
by kin tin Mftttey / 



Your campaign will finish in the money if vou start 
by buying broadcast I N Lexington. In all the world, 
only Lexington broadcasters effectively influence 
the $445,793,000 retail purchases made by 559,200 
people in the growing 30-county Lexington trading 
area. Get your share of $657,165,000 consumer spend- 
able income by buying broadcast IN Lexington . . . 
Don't head the wrong direction in planning your 
next campaign. 



You Have to Buy LEXINGTON 

to Cover the Rich, Growing 

30-County 

Central 

Kentucky 

Market 




FROM THE FABULOUS FIVE IN LEXINGTON 

WBLG * WlAP * WVLK • WKYT-TV *WIEX-TV 



4 july 1960 




ose who live on air.. 




In the las', three decades advertisers and their agencies 
have spent billions of dollars on air. A lot of people 
lived on it. A lot of goods were moved. 

r who live on air SPONSOR serves a function 
no other publication can match, for SPONSOR is 
the most definitive study of air in the broadcast in- 
dustry. It is the news of air— the plans of air— the 
u of air— the thoughts of air— the very life of 
livered to you every week — 52 weeks a year. 



and earn its salt are just much too important for 

light reading on a routing list. 

If you live on air — read SPONSOR at home. Read 
it on A time, B time or C time but make sure it's 
free time at home. At the price of only $8 a year you 
can have 52 issues of this most useful publication in 
the field at your side — to see, study, tear out and file. 
It's the best investment you'll ever make. Order your 
home subscription today. 



■ ' ry man who's gotten anywhere in air reads 

SPONSOR. The man who wants to get there faster 

SPONSOR at home— because the very chem- 

broadcasting— the factors that make it move 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 






'. 



Whats happening in V. S. Government 

that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



* WASHINGTON WEEK 



4 July I960 

Copyright I960 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The broadcasting industry will have a chance to speak its piece on suspension 
of station licenses for up to 10 days and fines of $1,000 per day for violation of 
FCC rules before the Senate acts on the propositions. 

Hardly had senate majority leader Lyndon Johnson finished telling the world on Wednes- 
day that Congress could not conclude this week after all (adjourning until August), that Sena- 
tor John Pastore announced a new set of hearings. 

Pastore, chairman of the Senate Commerce Communications Subcommittee, said that 
August would be the time. The senate may be meeting for a good part of that month 
to clear up its unfinished business. 

Rep. Oren Harris, chairman of the House Commerce Committee, had chosen a purely 
procedural Senate-passed bill on which to tack the license suspension-fine-payola-sponsorship 
identification provisions. 

This maneuver sent these actions directly to a senate-house conference, by-passing Sen- 
ate Commerce Committee hearings, and full-scale committee and Senate floor de- 
bates. With the sands apparently running out on this session of Congress, the Senate con- 
ferees were presented practically Avith a take-it-or-leave-it proposition. 

However, the over-all effect of the changed situation may be to make it more probable, 
rather than less probable, that the suspension-fine section will be approved by the 
Senate conferees. It is difficult to gauge with accuracy, but the added time will rob oppo- 
nents of these provisions of the argument that the Senate didn't have time to consider them 
adequately. 

Other sections are not too controversial, and are favored by the broadcasting industry. 

• As asked by tbe industry, station personnel and program suppliers would be brought 
under prohibitions against payola and plugola, plus ban against "fixing" content 
of intellectual knowledge. There would be fines of up to $10,000 and jail terms of up to 
a year for violators. 

• The FCC's much assailed interpretations of the section 317 sponsorship identification re- 
quirements would be rolled back. Once again, free records could be accepted and such as free 
props and payment of remote expenses, so long as there were to be no on-the-air plug. 

The broadcasting industry could take considerable comfort from house action on the bill, 
even though the final measure was unpalatable. 



Rejection of two separate amendments by Rep. John Bennett (R., Mich. I . the first to 
regulate networks and the second to license them as well, was kept from being conclusive 
because most House Legislative Oversight subcommittee members were among the 
vast majority voting against (101-16 and 149-35). 

Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.), chairman of the group, typified the opposition, which voted 
in the face of a subcommittee report calling for web licensing and regulation and his own 
earlier introduction of a bill to the same effect. 



The Senate passed, almost without debate, the bill which would lift the restric- 
tions of Sec. 315, the equal time part of thecommunications act. for 1960 only, and for 
presidential and vice presidential candidates only. 

Fate of the measure to lift the equal time strictures completely for heads of the two 
major party tickets this year was far from clear. It would have to be expedited to survive 
the adjournment rush, and promises of red carpet treatment have not been made by Rep. Harris. 



• 4 july 1960 



55 



Significant newt, trend* in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • CommercUdt 



FILM-SCOPE 






I In- food money Baya that comedy will make a comeback in syndication this year. 

T\w weeks ago Blue Plate Foods (Fitzgerald) put down an estimated $350,000 for a 
35-market southern regional of CBS Films's Brothers Brannagan, a comedy detective series, 
now sold in 55 markets. 

This week two other food deals built up the comedy trend: 

• H. P. Hood iKenyon & Eckhardt) made a 52-week full sponsorship deal covering all 
New In-land with CNP's newspaper comedy entry Hot Off the Wire (Jim Backus). The 
price: $200,000. 

• Lay's Potato Chips i Liller, NeaL Battle and Lindsey) purchased CBS Films' new car- 
toon show, Deputy Dawg, in 45 southeast markets in a 26 over 52 alternate week deal, esti- 
mated at S300,000. 

The total value of these three new deals — all by food products and for shows 
containing comedy — is 8850,000. 

Note too that Screen Gems' Two Faces West, now starting to make station sales, although I 
its a Western, also has a comedy twist. 

Look closely at the comedv bandwagon and you'll see three separate trends: 

1 l The first pure comedy to go into syndication in some time, Jim Backus. 

2) A major revival of cartoon comedy ( See FILM-SCOPE, 20 June). 

3) A strong trend toward the comedy twist in action shows such as Brothers 
Brannagan and in Screen Gems' Two Faces West, another brand new show just now making 
its first syndication deals. 

The CBS flagship has opened up a nighttime half hour for syndication. 

WCBS-TV, Vw York, will put Robert Herridge Theatre into the 10 p.m. Thursdav slot 
for the summer months. 

Such a slot for syndication could have important implication for CBS affiliates, who may 
well ask why they can't take back nighttime half hours for syndication if their own 
flagship can do so. 

Herridge, incidentally, for a long time produced Camera Three for WCBS-TV and CBS 
I\. but it was limited to Sunday morning time periods until it went into syndication, thanks 
partly to video tape. 

Stations and sponsors who picked up NTA's Play of the Week for public rela- 
tions and prestige reasons are getting a surprise from its high ratings in many cities. 

Recent sales in St. Louis, Detroit. Philadelphia, and San Francisco have put the show into 
49 markets; it is already sponsored in Baltimore. Buffalo. Chicago. Cleveland. Dallas, Los 
Angeles. Albany. Washington, and New York. 

Here are latest ARB reports on Play of the Week in seven markets, including some in 
which it substantially outpointed network programing previously scheduled in ex- 
BCtlj th<- same time periods: 

CITY STATION RATING 

I M \ngeles KCOP 13.2 

Baltimore \\ HAL-TV 1 7.9 

Denver KOA-TV 18.0 

Washington WTOP-TV 11.1 
KTNT-TV 7.5 

New York \\ \TA-TV 17.9 (weekly cume) 

Pittsburgh WHC 16.6 (phone coincidental) 

SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



^ FILM-SCOPE continued 



Paramount** Telemeter pay-tv experiment in Toronto, Canada, has made sev- 
eral important discoveries about programing, audience acceptance, and ratings. 

A three-channel system kept attractions available at §1 each for three or four days, so 
that several earned accumulated ratings representing 22' <■■ to 50% of subscribers. 

It was found that special sports events boosted sets in use without taking audience 
away from feature films, the main attraction of the system. 

Ampex dealt out a handful of extra v. p. stripes this week. 

Charles S. Ginsburg, who developed the Videotape recorder, was elected a v.p. and was 
made manager of advanced development. 

Simultaneously Robert Sackman became chief operating officer, and Phillip L. Gundy and 
Thomas L. Taggart were named senior v.p.'s, the former in international professional and au- 
dio products and the latter in data, military and industrial areas. 

Things were buzzing on the sports programing front this week. 

Here's what happened : 

• Trans-Lux Tv acquired distribution rights to a 90-minute tv film of the 1956 Olympics, 
entitled Melbourne Rendezvous. 

• Banner Films will sell the new Roller Derby "series of 52 new first-run full hours; 39 
additional shows will be ready for 1961. 

• Ring Classics, which recently took over tv rights to Madison Square Garden films, is 
going ahead with dubbing plans in four languages: French, German. Italian, and Swedish. 

Banner Films was active in non-sports programs this week, too, chalking up 12 station 
sales of its new Bold Journey syndicated series. (See FILM WRAP-UP, p. 62, for 
details.) 

Arthur Krim succeeds Eliot Hyman as president of UAA, sister organization of 
Ziv-UA in the United Artists tv family. 

The function of the two companies continues to be clear-cut: UAA handles features and 
cartoon product, mostly theatrical, for stations, while Ziv-UA makes and sells for tv, reaching 
regional and national buyers with program series. 



Advertising men in varying regions have been able to see screenings of the win- 
ners and runners-up of the First American Tv Festival and Forum. 

This week festival director Wallace Ross screened commercials and made awards in Min- 
neapolis-St. Paul at a combined luncheon-seminar of advertising, tv/radio and sales clubs. 

American automotive commercials turned in some impressive performances at 
the Venice festival just concluded. 

Alexander Film Co. of Colorado Springs walked away \\ith the tv Grand Prix for a 
Corvair commercial and an over-45 seconds live action award for Dodge. 

Playhouse Pictures also won a first prize in the under one-minute category for a Ford 
commercial, and incidentally took first prize in animation for Kaiser foil. 

AFTRA and SAG both took a look at David Cole's merger plan this week, but 
there were basic reservations on both sides. 

Both union committees, now reporting back to tlie respective national boards, also ex- 
plored some alternate ideas on cooperation and mutual effort. 

• 4 jult 1960 57 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



4 j u | y i960 Agency managements keep learning the hard way that you can't take old client 

tawHftt i mo alliances for granted. 

inhiod Take, as an example, the switch of that $10-million-plus account recently. 

publication* mo I 'he client's major gripe: important people in the agency hadn't for some time thought 

it imperative to come calling; in fact, account people neglected attending major sales meet- 
ings, each one thinking, apparently, that a colleague would be there. 

The client disavows it but reports persist that the Manischewitz Wine (Monarch) 
account, now with Gumbinner, is scanning another pasture. 

The vino bills around $2 million, mostly in air media. 

ABC TV's station relations seems to be getting somewhat miffed at those NBC 
TV affiliates who use it as a pawn to better its cardrate with the latter network. 

Like that Carolina station that just recently inveigled ABC into serious primary nego- 
tiations only to extend its NBC contract at a hiked rate. 

Incidentally, ABC is aiming hard to overcome the absence of primary affiliates in the 
home markets of two of its major clients: Brown & Williamson, Louisville ; R. J. Rey- 
nolds, Winston-Salem. You might add: Eastman Kodak, Rochester. 

Old nomenclature in a trade resist being consigned to limbo but it's happening to the 
term "audience participation." 

The tv networks prefer to call 'em game shows, and it looks as though the tag is 
going to ^tiek. 

Some agency tv department heads think that the networks are overdoing the 
program promo bit on their spot carriers. 

The complaint: with unsold minutes being used to plug several programs the average 
\ iewer becomes so confused that he doesn't know what show's coming up next. 

In other words, the eye and ear is flooded with so many flashes of things to watch the 
brain neither assimilates nor calendars anything. 

Believe it or not, media buyers have become somewhat callused — in a bemused 
way — to the caper not a few tv stations go through in raising their rates. 

The caper: the rates are jacked up but the discounts are increased, with the net 
result that things are pretty much where they were. 

The reply a media executive got from a station operator when asked the reason for all 
this pother: "By showing we're getting a higher local rate we've got a better chance 
of elbowing the network into a higher network rate." 

Ever keep tabs on how infrequently an account executive can be reached during 
llie working day? 

Well, a rep \\ho had a special story for several of them lately kept a record of his calls 
and came up with an average of one out of 10. The garnered impression: that as a mover- 
aboul the a e holds the edge over everybody in the agency but the mailboy. 

SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 




WHICH JOB WOULD YOU TAKE? 



If you're like most of us, you'd take the 
job with the more tempting salary and 
the brighter future. 

Many college teachers are faced with 
this kind of decision year after year. In 
fact, many of them are virtually bom- 
barded with tempting offers from busi- 
ness and industry. And each year many 
of them, dedicated but discouraged, leave 
the campus for jobs that pay fair, com- 
petitive salaries. 

Can you blame them? 

These men are not opportunists. Most 
of them would do anything in their power 
to continue to teach. But with families 
to feed and clothe and educate, they just 
can't make a go of it. They are virtually 

|j^^|p Sponsored as a public service, 

U^fcgfisv/' in co-operation with the Council for Financial Aid to Education 



forced into better paying fields. 

In the face of this growing teacher 
shortage, college applications are ex- 
pected to double within ten years. 

At the rate we are going, we will soon 
have a very real crisis on our hands. 

We must reverse this disastrous trend. 
You can help. Support the college of your 
choice today. Help it to expand its facili- 
ties and to pay teachers the salaries they 
deserve. Our whole future as a nation 
may depend on it. 



It's important for you to know more about what 
the impending college crisis means to you. Write 
for a free booklet to: HIGHER EDUCATION, 
Box 36, Times Square Station, New York 36, N.Y. 



PONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



the unite o( thia sei 
Still left open: an ei 



l,i), 



< ampaigns 

• I be J«»«- Lowe Corp., licensor! 

pucle" and " « »n -it -t it k " re- 
lated prodot i-. will tie in with Batjac 
Prodortkmi on .1 nationwide pro- 
motion f"i the forthcoming movie, 
•■ I he \l.i ." I he 1 oast-tow <>.i>i cam- 
paign I "ui of Gardner Advertising I 
. .til- f.. t saturation l«> and 20-eecond 
■pota <>ii 75 i\ stations in ke\ markets. 

• Hotel Bar Batter has sched- 
uled the heavies! advertising cam- 
paign in it- history to promote it- 
produd during the picnic and barbe- 
que season. I h< campaign, in Metro- 
politan New York, is via a heavy 
radio drive on WOR,WNB( . \WI W. 
and \\ \l< \. Plana also call for ad- 
ditional radio in a new market-by- 
niarkci promotion starting with We-t- 
. hestei in mid-July. Vgency . Pace 
Advertising. 

• Ma\ Factor wiD launch nation- 
ally it- new make-up, Sheer Genius, 
early in October. This introduction 
will be heavily supported by nation- 
wide spol t\ beginning 3 October. 

\\ itli s(» million already com- 
milled for convention coverage 
<>n ( ll> T\ . \\ estinghnnse took 
a poll anions political Bcience 
profs as a promotion for the tele- 

ra-l«. 

Question asked 1>\ the poll: what 
effect i\ had on politics in the U.S.? 
The response was 

I he concensus <d opinion: t\ stim- 
ulated more voter interest and made 
them more critical of candidates. Bui 
there was this reservation: the criti- 

< i-in fo< used more on appearance and 
performance than on issues. 

network convention coverage 
schedule on page IV 1 

< arter Products, Inc.. manufac- 
turers of Rise shaving cream, and its 
agent \ SSC&B, have !>«•«■ n 
charged by the FTC with using 
deceptive u commercials. 

Uso joined in the FTC complaint 
!• ej. in Bay les, SSCB executive 
in 1 barge of the Rise account 

ton foi the complaint: Rise's 
implication thai competing lathers 
dry out during a shave, making the 
shave more difficult and uncomfort- 
able, while Rise stays "moist and 
throughout" resulting in an 
ind more comfortable Bhave. 



Strictly personnel: Alexander 
Galloway, elected president of R. J. 
Reynolds tobacco Co. , . . Kenneth 
Roman Jr.. named manager of ad- 
vertising and sales promotion for 
\llied Chemical Corp. . . . James 
KJenske, to assistant general sales 
manager for Mars. Inc. . . . Patrick 
Connolly, to product manager in the 
foods Division of Lever . . . John 
Scharwath, to -ales promotion man- 
o] the Fine Chemicals Division 
of Shulton . . . Ned Calkins, to gen- 
eral sales manager for Ovaltine Food 
Products. 



Nothing can take the place of 
the headlines in making older 
tv film shows topical again. 

Xi\ I A. for example, has found 
s|i\ news of the day has produced a 
warmed-up interest in its two classics. 
/ Led Three Lives and Man Called X. 

Fourteen stations bought one or 
both of the shows recently : WISN-TV, 
Milwaukee: WEHT-TV. Evansville: 
WGAN-TV, Portland: WCTV. Talla- 
hassee: WXBQ. Chicago: WOI-TV. 
Ames; KSL-TV. Salt Lake City; 
KPAC-TV. Port Arthur: KCOR-TY. 
San Antonio: WNEW-TV, New York: 
WHDH-TV. Boston: WESH-TV. Or- 
lando: WSPA-TV. Spartanburg; and 
W\( T.Greenville. 

Sales: CBS Films" Deputy Dang to 
W M)l -TV, South Bend: KONO-TV, 
San Antonio: WCAU-TV, Philadel- 
phia: WGAN-TV, Portland, and 
WKBW-TV, Buffalo . . . 150 feature 
films sold by Screen Gems in Au- 
stralia to TCN, Sydney, and HSV. 
Melbourne . . . Jayark's Bozo the 
Clown sold in Japan, the Philippines, 
and Guam; it is now dubbed in Jap- 
I tench. Portuguese and Span- 
ish . . . Official Films' Greatest Head- 
lines of the Century to WFMB-TV, 
Indianapolis; WXYZ-TV, Detroit: 
KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh; \\ FBC-TV. 
Greenville; and KELP-TV, El Paso... 
Banner Films' Hold Journey to 
WTPA-TV, lla.risl.urj-: WNEP-TV, 
Scranton; KFJZ-TV, Ft. Worth: 
WIIC, Pittsburgh; KCRA-TV, Sac 
ramento; WWL-TV, New Orleans: 
WHY. Indianapolis; KPIX, San 
Francisco; KPLR-TV, St. Louis: 
WFGA-TV, Jacksonville: WTVJ, 
Miami, and KLIX-TV, Twin Falls. 



Commercials: Jerome G. Forman 

has formed his own film production 
company. Allegro Productions, at 
723 Seventh Avenue in New York . . . 
Mel London has been appointed ex- 
ecutive producer of the eastern divi- 
sion of Wilding. Inc. . . . Walter 
Lowendahl, one of the founders of 
Transfilm in 1941. has poined Dy- 
namic Films as executive v. p. and a 
director. 

Free film: Stations may obtain 
copies of a 4Vo minute film on home 
tv reception from Channel Master 
Corp. in Eilenville, N. Y. 



Strictly personnel : Art Stolnitz to 

new post of program development 
director of Ziv-UA . . . Perry Frank 
leaves NT A to head Sports Photos . . . 
Bob Lang rejoins NTA sales staff . . . 
Selmer (Sonny) Chalif named 
general assistant to William Dozier 
at Screen Gems . . . Warren M. 
Peterson named midwest sales repre- 
sentative for RCA Recorded Program 
Services. 

Re-run sales: Ziv-UA's Economee 
division reports these re-run sales or 
renewals this week: Highway Patrol, 
I Led Three Lives, and Science Fic- 
tion Theater to WISN-TV, Milwau- 
kee: Highway Patrol to WOC-TV, 
Davenport; Highway Patrol to 
WTVY, Dothan; Highway Patrol to 
KOVR, Stockton ; Highway Patrol to 
KSOO-TV, Sioux Falls; Harbor Com- 
mand, West Point, Men of Annapolis, 
and Dr. Christian, to WTTV, Indian- 
apolis: Boston Blackie and Mr. Dis- 
trict Attorney to WBAP-TV, Ft. 
Worth: Mr. District Attorney to 
WEHT. Evansville; / Led Three Lives 
to WCSH-TV, Portland; Mr. District 
Attorney to WSIX-TV, Nashville; Mr. 
District Attorney to WNEW-TV, New 
York, and Yesterday's Neivsreel to 
W ABC-TV, New York. 



NETWORKS 



NBC TV is making it much easier 
for its daytime advertisers to 
earn continguity rates, starting 
with the fall. 

Advertisers with brand rates will 
no Longer he required to spot their 
quarter hours in a vertical pattern: 
they'll be able to move them around 
horizontally, spotting them on differ- 






SPONSOR • 4 .JULY 1960 



ent programs during one day or over 
several days of the week. 

For the time Lever will be the only 
client benefiting from the change in 
policy. It also gives NBC a momen- 
tary advantage over CBS TV, which. 
it can be expected, will react to it in 
due order. 

Where this more favorable rate will 
have an especial attraction: sponsors 
can move into new programs on vari- 
ous days of the week and benefit from 
the maximum continuity rate. 

(See page 29 and SPONSOR- 
SCOPE for analysis and latest devel- 
opments in daytime network tv.) 

NBC TV last week took its new 
study on new car prospects and 
tv's effectiveness in reaching 
them on a round of agencies. 

Among the highlights of the pres- 
entation: 

• 64% of the dealers picked tv as 
the best medium for selling the idea 
of the new small cars. 

• Undeclared car buyers (those in 
the market for a 1960 model) re- 
ported that tv advertising stands out 
more strongly in their minds than 
newspaper and magazine advertising 
combined. 

• These prospects said that tv gave 
them a ( 1 1 a higher awareness of the 
sponsors' slogans, (2) impetus to go 
to dealers' showroom, and I' 31 high- 
er opinion of advertised make. 

Here are TvB's estimated ex- 
penditures for the top 10 brand 
advertisers in network tv during 
April, followed by top 10 com- 
pany advertisers, as compiled by 
LNA-BAR: 



RATE 


BRAND 


GROSS TIME COSTS 


1. 


Anacin 


$746,461 


2. 


Dristan 


738,554 


3. 


Phillies 


681,129 


4. 


Bayer Aspirin 


i 572.197 


5. 


Winston 


571.244 


6. 


Texaco 


553,418 


7. 


L & M Filter 


516.747 


8. 


Pall Mall 


503.724 


9. 


Colgate 


483,679 


10. 


Phillips Milk 


of 




Magnesia 


463,577 


RANK 


COMPANY 


GROSS TIME COSTS 



1. P&G $3,837,036 

2. American Home 2,752.096 

3. Lever 2,214,332 

4. Colgate 2.016.510 

5. General Motors 1,890.777 



6. General Foods 1,785,583 

7. Sterling Drug 1,455,981 

8. R. J. Reynolds 1,380,019 

9. Ford 1,036,366 
10. Gillette 1.028.406 

Right on the heels of last week's 
NBC announcement concerning 
"in the black*" operation, is its 
claim that advertisers on NBC 
Radio are reaching a larger audi- 
ence than those on other net- 
works. 

The network's reason: the Nielsen 
report for the four-week period end- 
ing 8 Max shows that the top 12 ad- 
vertisers in terms of largest audience 
reached are on NBC Radio. Also, 
Nielsen shows 13 of the 15 top net- 
work sponsors reaching the greatest 
number of homes on NBC Radio. 

Network tv sales and renewals: 
Alberto-Culver (Wadel this sum- 
mer will co-sponsor M Squad with 
American Tobacco and Wichita 
Town, both NBC TV . . . Last friday. 
Procter & Gamble (B&B1 started 
sponsorship of the nighttime Video 
J Mage ... SI million in orders have 
been placed with NBC TV's Today 
and Jack Paar shows. The clients: 
Standard Triumph Motors 
iDCSSI. Saturday Evening Post 
(BBDOt. Lipton Tea (SSCB1, 
Kiwi Shoe Polish I Cohen & Ale- 
shire! . . . Williamson-Dickie (Full- 
er & Smith & Rossi and Pabst Brew- 
ing I Lennen & Newell 1 will co-spon- 
sor the 42nd PGA Championship to 
be aired 23-24 July on CBS-TV . . . 
Chrysler Corooration l Burnett 1 to 
present a Fred Astaire colorcast on 
NBC TV . . . Armstrong Cork Co. 
iBBDOl has renewed its alternate 
Wednesdax on CBS TV for the sixth 
straight year. I For current network 
buvs. see Tv Comparagraph. page 45.1 

Network radio renewal: AFL-CIO 

renewed, for the sixth consecutive 
year. ABC's Edward P. Morgan and 
the News. 

Thisa V data: NBC News De- 
partment has put together a "1960 
Convention Handbook" as a source 
of background material for people 
following the conventions on tv and 
radio . . . CBS TV's Captain Kan- 
garoo will he cited as "'the best chil- 
dren's program for 1959" by the Gen- 
eral Foundation of Women's Club's 
. . . Advertising and promotion man- 



agers, representing 30 ABC TV af- 
filiates, met in New York last week 
with network publicity, promotion 
and advertising men for a two-day 
work session . . . Starting 1 August, 
Mutual will initiate an editorial -< i \ - 
ice for all its affiliates. 

Network personnel notes: How- 
ard W. Maschmeier elected chair- 
man of the board of governors of the 
ABC TV Affiliates Association . . . 
At NBC TV's Program Development 
department: Ross Donaldson to di- 
rector, creative services, and W. Pres- 
ton Wood to manager, script services 
. . . Charles J. Maguire to account 
executive at CBS TV Production Sales 
. . . Edward DeGray named director 
of radio-tv for Citizens for Johnson 
National committee. 



RADIO STATIONS 



WPTR, Albany-Schenectady- 
Troy, has a unique cross-country 
communications web planned for 
the upcoming political conven- 
tions and elections. 

With 25 Eastman-represented sta- 
tions, WPTR will be part of a news 
exchange network, and offer, in depth, 
coverage of local, sectional and na- 
tional importance. 

As a key "feeder" station. WPTR 
general manager Duncan Mounsey 
promises a minimum of 16 minutes 
an hour devoted to election coverage 
in the form of "feeds" from cooperat- 
ing stations. Of this, five minutes will 
be devoted almost exclusively to re- 
turns, and three minutes to state and 
local tallies. 

Baltimore'- 11 radio stations are 
cooperating in a saturation safe- 
ty campaign, "Operation Life 
Saver." 

Approximately 67.000 safeh an- 
nouncements, at least one per hour 
per station, is planned for a one-year 
period. The estimated cost, donated 
bv the stations, will exceed $250,000. 

Ideas at work : 

• Vacation minded: WSAI, 

Cincinnati, drummed up more than 
820.000 worth of business for North- 
west Orient Airlines via the Jack 
Reynolds Shou. The campaign: two 
one-minute spots per show for two 
months to promote a Hawaiian tour. 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



63 



U will <- ori tin- lour, and be 
,,,i envoj foi bis home town mayoi 
\,\ preieiiting the ke) to th<- cirj (< in- 

. in. i. iii i to the ma) f Honolulu, 

.iinl (,,i ili. governoi of < Hi i« > 1>\ 
laque to the island's 
chief i\>> utive. Uso planned 
mote broadi .1-1 and telephone reports 
from Hawaii i" ti<- in with the trip. 

• Ho* t<» I i x « - like ;• million* 
■in : K\l li. I ittle Rock, will treat 
one "f ii- listeners to .1 daj in the life 
of ■ millionaire. I he idea : a com- 
posite < ommercial, produced 1>\ tak- 

ments from ten commercials 
now being aired, must be unscrambled 
.uhI listed coi re H\ . The \\ inner be- 
Nfillionaire for a Daj . 
. New Immi: w < SH-AM-TV, 
Portland, \1<-.. i- distributing plastic 
.1. ..in- throughout the city as part "f 
a contest being held in honor of the 
station's 35th anniversary. The idea: 
.11 ..in- ( ontain 1 oniety instructions 
and numbers 1-35: prizes will be 
awarded to those who colled a full set 
of numbers or combinations totalling 

• On the juicj Bide: WTEN. 
Philadelphia, has just awarded an or- 
ange tree in Orlando. I'la.. to the 
winner of ii- "Snowcrop Orange 

ontest. The prize entitles the 
winner to the juice of the fruit from 
this tiff for one full % ear. 



Tbisa "n' data: KMOV St. Louis, 
hosted a midnight dinner-party and 
tour for 12 CBS Radio Spol -alesmen 
. . . WPEN, Philadelphia, helped 
Franks Beverages to celebrate their 
12th anniversary a- sponsors <>n the 
station . . . WCAU, Philadelphia, 
honored appliance dealer. Gerhard's, 
Inc., for the creation of the first 
locall) broadcast stereophonic com- 
mercials . . . Business note: ka\ 
Construction Co. signed a long-term 
contract with WQMR, Washington, 
for an hour long -how : believed to 
he the fn-t real est ite firm to sponsor 

it- own ladio show . . . \iini- rr-ur\ 
not. : Jim Holt ..I \\|!/ & \\ BZA, 

Boston-Springfield, celebrating his 

ln-t anniversary with the station . . . 

Adopts single rate: WAM-E, Mi- 

Ef« live 1 July, will merge na- 

' ad> ertising rate- into 

ith the same discounts 

botl Business up: 

the week ending . 

' leveland, were up 
week last year. 



Station acqu i-it iona : W \< E, 
Springfield-Holyoke-Chicopee, Mass., 
sold bj Regional Broadcasting Co. to 
( Commonwealth Broadcasting Co. for 

-_>-,( 1.1 11 11 1. brokered bj Edwin Torn- 
berg &C< KRTN, Raton, V \L 

from \\ . Lloyd Mawkins. to Jay 
Howe and Marvin Schete, for|95,000, 
brokered b) Hamilton-Landis & Asso- 
ciates . . K\(iO. Klamath Falls. 
Ore., From Gibson Radio to \. J. 
Krisik, Ted Wolf, Judd Sturtevant, 

and John re,.,, for S2()2.0(M). brok- 
ered b) Edwin Tornberg & Co. 

( hange of rail letters: KPOA. 
Honolulu, now kk \ V. 

Station staffers: William H. Reu- 
man, to v. p. sales at WWRL and 
Will \1. New York . . . William M. 
Humphreys, to national sales man- 
ager at \\ ICY Mineapolis-St. Paul 
. . . Robert Churney, to station 
manager of KGVO, Missoula . . . 
\S illiam Fallon, to regional sales 
manager of w ICE. Providence . . . 
Kay \ itale, to assistant sales promo- 
tion manager at YYCBS. New York . . . 
David O. Ives, to assistant general 
manager \\ OBH-FM-TV, Boston . . . 
John R. Peterson and Francis 
Mulhall, new account executives at 
WFBM, Indianapolis . . . Bill Bax- 
ley to account executive at KLAC, 
Los Angeles . . . Dick Schofield, 
to sales manager for KFOX. Long 
Beach. Cal. . . . Frank Knorr, 
Jr., to director of operations for 
WSAI, Cincinnati . . . Hilton 
Hodges, to station manager for 
WIBW, Topeka . . . Robert French, 
to sales manager of WTVN-FM, Co- 
lumhus . . . Dorothy Abbott, to sta- 
tion manager of KNDI, fulltime all- 
girl station in Waikiki. Hawaii . . . 
Charles Bill, to farm director for 
WLS. Chicago . . . John Hardy, to 
program director at KSAN, San 
Francisco . . . Dick Mattson, to 
sales service coordinator at KABC. 
Hollywood . . . Charles Breece. to 
program manager of WFBM. Indian- 
apolis. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Look for Adam Young's fm divi- 
sion to make available to adver- 
tisers and agencies within the 
next 30 days its first package 
ratecard. 



The package will consist of fm sta- 
tions in the top 30-40 markets. 

Rep appointments — stations: 

\\ I l\. NeM Orleans, to Robert E. 
Eastman & Co. . . . KSOO-TV, 
-mux Falls. S. D.. to Harrv S. Hvett 
Co. 

\c\n company: Heritage Stations 
Representatives, a new subsidiary 
of International Good Music. Inc. 
Firm was organized to represent 
Heritage FM Stations in the U. S. 

Rep appointments — personnel: 

To sales staffs: Joseph Fierro, at 

Katz Agency. New York . . . Bernie 
Kvale at Avery-Knodel, Chicago . . . 
Bob Miller at Yenard, Rintoul & 
McConnell. New York. 



TV STATIONS 



Westinghouse Broadcasting Co.'s 
petition to intervene in NBC's 
plans for exchange of radio and tv 
stations in Boston and Philadelphia 
was rejected this week by U. S. 
District Court Judge William 
Kirkpatrick. 

Westinghouse protested that XBC's 
exchange was a violation of many of 
the terms of the consent decree. Ans- 
wered Judge Kirkpatrick: he had no 
jurisdiction to grant WBC's petition. 

By 1970. local advertising in all 
media should hit an annual rate 
of S10 billion, with tv getting 
SI. 5 billion of the total, pre- 
dicted TvB's Norman Cash this 
week. 

In the past decade, he noted, na- 
tional advertising expenditures in all 
media increased bv 106 r r — more 
than double the 1950 total of 13.25 
billion. 

"This was the direct result of tv 
coming into being as the new adver- 
tising force for national advertisinof. 
While tv's share of all advertising 
was slightlv less than 14' < in '59, tv 
accounted for 27.3 r V of all new ad- 
vertising dollars. 1950 to 1959." said 
Cash. 

Ideas at work : 

• Tv afloat : WFAA-TV, Dallas. 
last week recruited its first advertiser 
for use of the station's new 40-foot 
cruiser. The client: Humble Oil Co. 
The purpose: to video tape the 11- 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1960 



ame Southwest Conference Game of 
ke Week series this fall. The Chan- 
el 8 cruiser, a virtual tv station on 
heels, will travel to the site of the 
1 games each week to tape the com- 
•lete action. Then, while returning to 
)allas, engineers will be able to edit 
nd splice the tape on the two \mpe\ 
ecording machines within the unit. 

• On the local specials front : 
LNTV, San Jose, telecast an hour- 
feg Summer Olympic Preview spe- 
ial, sponsored by Falstaff Beer. The 
rogram featured interviews with the 
thletes. films of them in action, and 

round table discussion with four 
)lympic coaches. 

Subscription tv details : The Hart- 
ord Phonevision Co., a subsidiarv 
f RKO General, last week filed its 
ormal application with the FCC to 
onduct a three-year subscription 
v test in Hartford, via WHCT. 

Joining in the application were 
IKO General, Teco, and Zenith Radio 
orp. of Chicago, which developed 
he Phonevision svstem to be used. 

How it works: The cost for the 
najority of subscription pro- 
grams (which will include most 
.lass A movies, legitimate theatre 
roductions. musical events, sports 
rograms and the like), will range 
>etween 75c and $1.50 — at or 
>elow box-office admission charges in 
he Hartford area. There will be at 
east one or two premium subscrip- 
ion programs, without commercials, 
ired each day. 

Hartford Phonevision proposes to 
>egin operations as soon as 2.000 de- 
:oders have been installed. 

JThisa 'n' data: WNEW-TV. New 

fork independent, has tied-up with 
mwsweek Magazine for its planned 
laily telecast from both the Demo- 
:ratic and Republican Convention 
|>ites (See page 45 for the networks' 
invention schedule) . . . WCCO- 
||TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul, is now 
circulating among advertisers and 
jigencies its new "Market Guide" bro- 
chure . . . KFMB-TV, San Diego, 
jiow provides viewers with unique 
L-Ioseups via its new 110 inch tele- 
i-copic dualfocal length reflecting lens 
developed bv John Westhaver . . . 
•w'SIX-TV. Xashville. hosted a bar- 
.oeque dinner for admen and adver- 
tisers to introduce them to its new 
\mpex videotape machines. ^ 




THE SALOX . . . TOULOrSELAVTEEC 



Put your advertising dollars ** KM\\ 17 

on the No. 1* BUY in HOUSTON... f\ # |N|UZ. 
. . . lowest cost per thousand ! 



*See Latest Surveys for Houston 




SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



when 

your 

clients 

demand 




SAN ANTONIO'S 

LAa*isieo\ 




ABC Television in San Antonio... 

the Greatest Unduplicoted live 

(overoge in South Texasl 

Represented by 
THE KATZ AGENCY 







as field merchandis 



William Heaton has been elected presi- 
dent of Spot Time Sales. Inc.. a new radio 
station representative specializing in small 
markets. Heaton had been with Daren F. 
McGavren for the past three years as Chi- 
cago manager and assistant New York sales 
manager. He started his career at the Pasa- 
dena Star News in the national advertising 
department, moved to KTTV. Los Angeles, 
rep. and then to K.ULA Honolulu as account 



exec. Heaton was also broadcast specialist with Kaiser Alun 



Richard F. Reynolds was named v. p. and 
director of radio and tv for D. P. Brother. 
He has been with tbe Detroit based agencv 
since 1955. Reynolds was. at one time, a 
reporter <>n the Indianapolis News and 
general manager of Cinecraft Productions. 
He served with the I. S. Bureau of Aero- 
nautics during World War II. and while 
a lieutenant commander, was cited for de- 
veloping new motion picture production techniques. Re\ nolds has 
subsequentl) received many awards for his tv production work. 

SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



J 



Robert M. Hetherington, vice president 
and general manager of KXLW . Clayton 
i St. Louis I since 1958. joins the sales staff 
of K\\ K. St. Louis. Prior to joining KXLW, 
he was sales manager of \HL. St. Louis. 
Hetherington has been a member of the 
St. Louis Ad Club for 11 years. He is also 
a member of the board of director? of the 
Media Club and has served on the Senior 
\d\Uor\ Council of the St. Louis County Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce. He resides with his wife and daughter in Webster Groves. 

Terry Hughes has been appointed man- 
ager of the Minneapolis office of H-R Rep- 
resentatives and H-R Tv. which will open 
1 Jul\ in the Northwestern National Bank 
Building. A veteran of more than 10 years 
in tv and radio. Hughes" background in- 
cludes sales work for the Chicago Herald- 
American and for Capper Publications' 
radio stations. He joined the sales staff at 

H-R Reps. Chicago, in November. 1957. Hughes is a graduate of 
DePaul I niversit) and served as a I . S. Nav\ pilot during W . \S . II. 




ABRAHAMS 

(Continued from fxige 44) 
of factors which TvB and Abrahams 
are making the most of. There are 
many changes going on in the de- 
partment store business among which 
these are of great importance: 

• Rise of Suburbia, demonstrated 
pointedly in the new U.S. Census. 
(By the end of this year there will be 
over 5,000 shopping centers at city 
perimeters. Many downtown stores 
are opening branches in such centers. 

• Metropolitan newspapers have 
failed to keep up with this popula- 
tion drift to the suburbs, but tv is 
following it right out of town. 

• Concession operations within de- 
partment stores have been dwindling. 
There was a time back in the Depres- 
sion era when, in some big stores, as 
much as 80 c /c of departments were 
run by concessionaires. Now with 
more departments falling under store 
management, advertising authority 
falls to fewer persons, and there is 
less "necessity" for relying on print 
ads just because it was easy to allot 
and charge so many lines of ad space 
to a concession department. 

• Mutual buying offices also are 
instrumental in building store regard 
for the tv medium. Scattered through 
the major markets of the U. S. there 
are about 10 very powerful buying 
offices which serve as "buy ing scouts" 
for department stores. These offices 
have been keeping an eye on the job 
tv is doing for national products, and 
often will hesitate to take on a line 
that doesn't have strong tv support. 

All of these things have helped in 
some measure to raise the average de- 
partment store's slice of ad budget for 
tv to about 10%. Abraham's advice 
at the recent clinics is for stations to 
try to get — as a starter — on a new- 
store account about 15% of the ad 
budget. This percentage has success- 
fully launched in tv many stores of 
many types. He further advises that 
this tv budget be broken into two 
types of promotion : (II a year-round 
programing vehicle such as a three- 
time-a-week news show, and ( 2 ) an- 
nouncement campaigns with flights 
geared to special selling seasons. 

Abrahams' counsel is based on a 
career in retailing that began in 1928. 
After he was graduated from Cornell 
that year in the first class of its now- 
famous hotel management course, he 
married, then took a job in the ad- 
vertising department of Rothschild's, 



the Ithaca department store. 

A year and a half later, he came to 
New York as basement ad manager 
at Bloomingdale's Department Store, 
later moved into its home furnishings 
advertising department. After a year 
there, he went over to Ludwig Bau- 
man as ad manager, where he re- 
mained until 1943. For the next two 
years, he was with the N. Y. Times. 

In 1945, Abrahams joined the Na- 
tional Retail Merchants Association 
as manager of the sales promotion 
division, left 10 years later to go with 
Amos Parish, a management con- 
sultant firm for department and spe- 
cialty stores. 

It was while at NRMA, that he be- 
gan developing a high enthusiasm for 
the medium that had recently come 
on the advertising scene. "The idea 
grew and grew that here was a tool 
designed to do a great job for re- 
tailers. In fact, it looked like the only 
one that combined all the essential 
ingredients: the visual quality of 
print, the audio of radio, the demon- 
strative advantages of a show window 
or counter display, and the emotional 
impact of across-the-counter selling." 
He was pretty well conditioned for 
that tap from TvB. ^ 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 53) 
a rapport between buyer and seller 
is attained — i.e. when the spot buyer 
can depend upon the fact that the 
salesman has exercised judgment in 
the selection of spot availabilities. 

Constant competitive pressure will 
undoubtedly make it necessary for 
the station representative to present 
his sales story quantitatively. How- 
ever, the selling, as well as the buy- 
ing, of spot announcements on a 
numbers basis only, regardless of 
competitive pressure, is a poor ireth- 
od of media selection. A proper bal- 
ance of quantitative and qualitative 
weight must be used by a time sales- 
man if he is to do service to his sta- 
tion and to the advertiser. 

A good station representative must 
have the ability to mix product, mar- 
ket, programing and statistical data 
and come up with a sound decision. 

James M. Alspaugh, vice president, 
H-R Representatives, Inc., New J ork 

The ingredients that comprise a 
good representative salesman are 
mostly those same virtues that com- 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



prise any good salesman — eagei 
aggressiveness, outgoing personality, 
intelligence, good grooming, and 
more importantly, knowing how to 
ask for the order. A representative 
salesman must be able to grasp the 
details of a station's story. He must 
develop a knack for retaining useful, 
facts and eliminate those which have 
no bearing on the success of a sale. 

Ability to synthesize. A good rep- 
resentative salesman should develop 
quickly the synthesis of his station's 
product in relation to the needs of 
prospective advertisers. The smart 
salesman is able to shape stations' 
rates, features, programs, etc.. to fit 
a particular advertiser's needs. 

Buyers time. A good rep salesman 
will always be considerate of an ac- 
count or agency buyer's time. There- 
fore, he will have his material organ- 
ized so that he can present it effi- 
ciently and meaningfully. 



Ability to shape 
rates, as well as 
programs, to an 
advertiser's 
needs 



Know when to listen. A good sales- 
man must know when to listen to his 
prospect as well as to make his pitch. 
Many salesman find this difficult. 

Follow-through. It is one thing to 
get a prospect warm, but in the final 
analysis, the only thing that counts is 
the sale itself, so follow-up calls, at 
sensibly spaced intervals depending 
upon the situation, are a requisite. 

Service. A good representative 
salesman will have an acute under- 
standing of the importance of the 
service aspect in our business. We 
must be able to go back to the same 
prospects to obtain renewals as regu- 
larly as possible. The rep salesman 
who gives good service to on-the-air 
accounts will often reap the highest 
percentage of renewals. 

Entertainment. A good rep sales- 
man must necessarily do a consider- 
able amount of wining and dining of 
prospects. The best I have known. 
however, do not over-indulge, but 
use plain common sense. At this time 
he is considerate of his firm"? ex- 
penses. However, he is not niggardly. 
In this aspect of the business good 
judgment is the only answer. ^ 

67 





frank- talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



//. agencies met) think they're getting local (specifically local New 
England ) audiem es but it's onl) wishful thinking, according to John Canty. 
< ommercial manager, If CCM, Lawrence, Mass. The fact is most local retail- 
ers cither never heard of or aren't interested in the rating services. "They 
don't haunt us for arailahililies in the traffic hours. Run-of-schedule makes 
■ ■ them." Cant) contends, and adding, "we don't hare to keep hammer- 
iri'j more people in Greater Laurence listen to us than to any other station. 
Why? Because they're interested in results — and results are what they get. 






FOOLS RUSH IN, WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD 



It'- too bad thai the merchant- in our market, and 
the big service companies and supermarkets of New 
England don't feel the ua\ New York agencie- do. 
^ c-. then we'd have to go out of business, and sur- 
render the biggesl radio audience in our market to 
th< Boston powerhouses that "cover"* us. Then the 
national advertiser who think- lie*- getting our audi- 
em e here realrj would he. and really would be get- 
tint: his money's worth. It's also too bad that every 
local station in a market of 50.000-150.000 sur- 
rounding Boston I other major markets take note. 
■ ildn'l have the same demise. If this hap- 
pened, the Y Y. agenc) would then he getting what 
it think- it"- getting now— the Brockton market, the 
Quinc) market, the Lowell market, the Lawrence 
market, the Haverhill market, the Salem market, 
and the Lynn market. (This i- a rough Boston metro- 
politan perimeter, i 

rhese poor local retailer- who probably have 
nevei heard of Nielsen, Hooper, or Pulse, can't seem 
to tell lt kilowatt from a 50-kw. The-e poor slobs 
onlj know one simple fact— that they, and most peo- 
ple in then trading area listen to us! They are real 
^ ankee Traders, and you've got to deliver or you're 
dc.id. We don'l have to keep hammering to them 
that more people in Greater Lawrence li-ten to us 
than to any other station. The\ know this. They 
want the same thing national advertisers want — re- 
-uIk "ind amazingly, these tool- who have heard 



only of Gallup and Kinsey. get results. They don't 
haunt us for availabilities in the traffic hour-. Run- 
of-schedule makes sense to them, in hitting as many 
of our daily audiences as they can. They tell us the! 
facts, we write it. they proofread it. You can bet 
they get their money's worth, and that they get their 
points across. Nothing stilted: nothing fancy. Just 
straight talk — plain, Yankee style. Sure soui^ 
convincin" on the air! 

We're No. 1 in Greater Lawrence I Pulse I. Thi- 
is contrary to the fact that we have no national food:- 
and grocery: no tobacco products: no national beer 
advertisers: no national gasoline and lubricants: and: 
no drugs and toilet requisites: no agriculture: seven 
of the top ten categories of National spot radio cate- 1 
gories. Despite the fact that there are over 300.000 
people in our primary coverage ( we cover them all. 
along with our secondary coverage that we don't 
even mention), we cater to a small nucleus of 140.- 
000 which is Greater Lawrence ( 28 miles north of 
Boston), the market we claim, the market we -erve. 
the market that in turn rewards us by listening more 
to u- than to any other station, including the Bostor. 
"coverers." 

Multiply us by at least 200 "fringe metropolitan" 
stations across the United States, and you can see 
the area that local fools rush into, while cautious, 
expert angel- (New ^ ork agencies) stav away — 
most, that is. ^ 

SPONSOR • 4 JULY 196C 



JAYTI.VIE TV 

Continued from page 32) 
ition of running "loss leaders" to 
J»ring in business. But as their losses 
jegin to be absorbed, they can plow 
■nore money into these two key areas. 
The growth process will move from 
mproved product — the programing 
—to a healthier industry state which 
will simultaneously profit the station 
n terms of local and spot. 

Programing, admen agree, will al- 
ways be the network's bailiwick be- 
ause of the exhorbitant costs, out of 
the question for most local stations. 
Some stations have introduced local 
shows on the daytime schedule with 
success, but few of them can expect 
rofits in doing this. Their reliance 
on network programing is, of course, 
major reason why they have been 
cooperative in accepting minimal day- 
lime reimbursement. 

Lowered price structures also serve 
to fill in the many open spots on the 
network schedules. ABC TV's fall 
prospectus, for example, is typical of 
the efficiency and effectiveness of a 
idaytime schedule. 

It concludes that 15 commercial 
minutes between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
slotted in four quarter-hours at a cost 
of $32,900 will make 29.4 million 
commercial impressions at a cost per 
1,000 homes per commercial minute 
f |1.11 with the application of its 
new bonus plan. And Ed Bleier. in a 
BBDO presentation recently, quoted 
specific package cost of 93 cents — 
"less than radio." 

Despite the simmering down of 
competition and the leveling of prices 
and programs, daytime is destined 
for the on-again-off-again uncertain - 
tv of nighttime television. 

One network sales manager ex- 
plained it this way: "It's like the re- 
tail business. Three brands compete 
with each other in cutting costs to get 
business. Then when sales are finally 
evened out and all three brands are 
getting a fair share, public taste 
changes and the item is dead. We'll 
go on copying each other and steal- 
ing from each other in programing 
to the current taste. But the public 
has fads and fancies, and that's why 
television will never be predictable. 

"We'll keep moving with the times, 
but not in the frantic way we've done 
for the past two years. Daytime ha? 
\ come of age, and we're starting to 
j meet the routine problems of life in a 
j more grown-up way." 1^ 

j SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



FILM 
BASICS I 



Nothing, but 
nothing is as 

I use-full in 
— 
conditioning 

sponsors and 



| RADIO 
BASICS 



I 



agencies for 
fall and winter 
buying as 
Sponsor's 



basics | Media Basics 



14th annual edition out 25 July 

Advertising deadline 11 July 

Not a directory, not a shelf reference- 
but an up to date, fact-packed guide 
for buying tv radio time 




SPONSOR 



Multiple rates and agency responsibilities 

The recent explosion over the old multiple-rate question, 
which was touched oil 1>> the ultimatum handed to leading 
radio representatives l>\ Y W. Oyer's Les Farnath, has re- 
Bulted (as it always does) in a lot of hurt feelings. 

\\r have heard from stations, from several representative 
firms, .iikI from othei agencies, and some «>t the comments 
were pretrj bitter. 

Man) broadcasters feel that agencies and advertisers 
wholk tail to understand their problems, and it is apparent 
In ii- that a number of radio station men do not thoroughly 
grasp the other side of the picture. 

It i- a completely distressing situation, and one for which 
unfortunate!) there seems to he no easy solution. 

Without attempting to take sides, there is, however, one 
thing we should like to sa) strongly to the agencies involved: 

You have a meat and continuing responsibility to prevent 
chiseling by your clients in any medium you use. You have 
an obligation to yourselves, and to the entire advertising in- 
dustry, to refuse to do business with advertisers whose prac- 
tice- are not open and above hoard. 

I oless ><>u have the courage to keep your clients in line, 
and to ruthlessl) drop those who overstep the boundaries of 
ethical business dealings, you are going to bring the whole 
structure ol the industry down around your ears. 

I here i- much in the rate situation which we all know must 
be corrected. Hut you in the agencies must do your parts. 

Tribute to a fellow publisher 

Mic passing last week of John \Y. AJicoate removed from 
the radio t\ scene a man who had served the industry faith- 
fulK and well since 1937 when he established Radio-Televi- 
sion Daily. 

\- fellow worker- in the held of broadcast trade paper 
publishing, we want to extend our deepest sympathies to hi> 
family, his business associates and his man) friends. 



this we fight FOR: In end to the paper 
work jungle which keeps radio and tv spot 
from reaching their true potential as ad media. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Buster: Tag line of a parody song 
on The Untouchables sung on a re- 
cent Canadian Broadcasting tv show: 
"Elliot Ness has broken up 
That old gang of mine." 
Port in a storm: The WCAIL Phila- 
delphia, "Sky Derby." in which three 
of the station's d.j.'s took off in three 
hydrogen-filled balloons from Valley 
Forge Airport the other day, came to 
an abrupt halt a few hours later when 
an electrical storm forced them all to 
land. Most forced landing of all was 
that of morning man Ed Harvev who 
came down inside Graterford Peni- 
tentiary, badly shaking the warden 
who thought it was part of an elabo- 
rate prison break plan. 
Quote: From an address by Bryan 
Houston, president of Fletcher Rich- 
ards, Calkins & Holden before AFA — 
"Roy Whittier once told me that it 
took two people to write a really great 
ad — one to write it, and the other to 
hit him over the head when it was 
done before be ruined it by fiddling 
with it ... it would be eminently 
practical if some such policy could 
be adopted ... if we could vest au- 
thority to edit in no more than one 
knowledgeable advertising man and 
eliminate the troupe of midgets who 
crawl all over the creative product 
with their little red pencils and 
squeeze the life out of it before it can 
be born." 

Philosophy: From Hardwick's (KVI, 
Seattle! Almanac — Going to a party 
with your wife is like going fishing 
with the game warden. 

More philosophy: From ABC's Don 
McNeill Breakfast Clu 6— Nature is 
wonderful. A million years ago she 
didn't know we were going to wear 
spectacles — yet look at the way she 
placed our ears. 

Alibi: In North Carolina, a robbery 
suspect told police he was watching 
the Arthur Murray Party at the time 
the crime was perpetrated, was con- 
victed when it was proved that in his 
market the show was a delav telecast. 
came on the air an hour later. 

Intro: From start of a short speech 
at Crown Stations recent "Treasure 
limit"" for Y V. C. timebuyers — "As 
Cleo said to Mark Anthony: I in not 
prone to argue/ " 

SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1960 



Everywhere people are saying . . 



Lancaster- Harrisburg -York 

is one TV market when ' 
you use WGAL-TV 




MULTI-CITY TV MARKET 




. The MEEKER Company, 



WGAL-TV 



is favored by viewers in Lancaster-Harrisburg-York, 
plus Gettysburg, Hanover, Lebanon, Chambersburg, 
Lewistown, Carlisle, Shamokin, Waynesboro, and many 
other communities. Profit-proved for advertisers, this 
multi-city market is important to your selling plans. 



WGAL-TV 

Lancaster, Pa 
NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 

York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Fran 



IT ALL ADDS U 



Summertime 

or any season . . . 

kTVu continues to 
deliver lower cost-per- 
thousand campaigns to 
Advertisers in the San 
Francisco Bay Area. 

Right now you can buy prime 
time availabilities (Minutes, 
twenties and ID's) in aM time 
segments . . . and only KTVU 
offers PLAN RATES on spots in 
all time classifications. 



ADD IT ALL UP . . . 
AND YOU WILL BUY 




CHANNEL 



San i-rancisco • Oakla 

AN NAB CODE STATION • represented by H-RTelevisic 




11 JULY I960 
40< a copy • SB a ymmr 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



TV: AGENCIES' 
KEY LEVER FOR 
NEW BUSINESS 

Creativity in video 
ads, media power is 
shading marketing in 
client presentations 

Page 33 



10 seconds 
that shook 
Madison Ave. 

Page 36 

Tv Commercials 
Festival: facts 
on the winners 

Page 38 

More specials 
in store 
for radio? 

Page 44 




The 
STORZ 
Stations 

today's Radio 
for today's selling 



WDGY. WhB. KOMA, WQAM 
represented bv John Blair & Co. 



BALANCED 




MEANS 

LISTENER 

LOYALTY 



KTRH is Houston's powerful radio 
voice for 60,000 square miles . . . 
blanketing over 80 counties . . . 
serving 1,087,100 radio house- 
holds including more than 
4,000,000 people as-. 

• The news and information 

station 

• The variety station 

• The network station 

• The family station 







■ 



© Vol. 14, \o. 28 • 11 JULY I960 



** SPONSOR 

'A THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Tv: agencies new business-getter 
33 'An agency's .il>ilit> to buy creativity force in television is its principal 
new business weapon,' an adman says. Here"* how they're doing it 

10 seconds that shook Madison Avenue 
36 Advertising agencies bristle over \BC TV plan for nightly 40-second 
stationbreak; charge overcommercialization: triple spotting feared 

Who scored in Commercials Festival 

38 The big ad agencies and commercial producers did well, but the smaller 
-Imp- were also well represented in sponsor's national video festival 

How to sell kids macaroni (on tv) 

42 Buitoni took an old product, dressed it up in a new package for a new 
market and promoted heavily on tv. Result: a sales rise by 800^ 

Is there a future in radio specials? 

44 Radio's biggest audience in years totaled 61 million for the world 
championship fight. Does this mean there'll be more radio specials? 

Standardized spot billing form clicks 

46 With more than 100 radio/tv stations agreeing to use new simpler spot 
billing form, sponsor committee clears up a few puzzling questions 

Rep gives its gals the salesman's grand tour 

47 A first for Harrington, Righter and Parsons. N.Y. rep firm, sending the 
ladies on a tour of one of their tv stations, proved very successful 



FEATURES 

60 Film Scope 

28 49th and Madison 

64 News 8 Idea Wrap-Up 

8 Newsmaker of the Week 

64 Picture Wrap-Up 

76 Seller's Viewpoint 

48 Sponsor \-k- 

14 Sponsor Backstage 



62 Sponsor Hears 

23 Sponsor-Scope 

78 Sponsor Speaks 

S3 Spot Buys 

78 Ten-Second Spots 

18 Timebuyers at Work 

74 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

56 Tv Results 

59 Washington Week 



Q^ 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial. Circulation *n« 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 8-2772 Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Birminfhi* 
Off.ce: 3617 8th Ave. South Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 31 10 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. S8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $• a 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore. Md. 

©1960 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




/ 



^ ^_ _ -v m CHANNEL 

YC Y LZC Q VY 13 

NORFOLK . HAMPTON, VIRGINIA 





n 






^SERVING VIRGINIA'S NO; TELEVISION MARKET 

• ••••« ® ^=L±a •••••• 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



COMIN&MSTRONG! 



*. X 




v< 





49.0 .Baton Rouge 

35.8 Atlanta 

32.2 Burlington 

28.2 Denver 

30.8 Davenport 

28.5 Oklahoma City 

39.1 ..Charleston 

43.0 Birmingham 

30.5 Roanoke 

20.8 Boise 

24.2 Milwaukee 

27.8 Tampa 

And these are ratings! 

WHIRLY BIRDS rates a rousing 
reception from the audience 
wherever it appears, currently 
landing a mighty 23.7 average 
rating in 89 ARB- rated markets. 

Naturally, advertisers rate 
WHIRLYBIRDS ( III half hours 
of airborne adventure ) equally 
high. Foods, tobaccos, utilities, 
banks, automotives, toiletries 
and beverages have chartered 
WHIRLYBIRDS in 136 markets 
to date. Reserve your market 
by calling the nearest office of 

CBS FILMS® 

the best film programs for all stations" 
New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, 
Boston, St. Louis, San Francisco, Dallas 
and Atlanta. Canda: S.W. Caldwell Ltd. 



WKOW-TV 

MADISON'S 

I Sction 

BUY FOR: 

| BLATZ 

7 years a WKOW-TV 
advertiser 

Consistency is vital in a top- 
selling beer, and consistent 
use of WKOW-TV has helped 
keep Blatz "First in Wiscon- 
sin.'' The late evening sports 
report with John Schermer- 
horn is a popular local fea- 
ture that has won thousands 
of new friends for "Mil- 
waukee's Finest Beer." 



KROGER 

5 years a WKOW-TV 
advertiser 

"Shopping with Luella" stars 
Luella Mortenson, well-known 
home economist in a week- 
ly value tour of "your 
friendly Kroger store." Five 
years of consistent results, 
in a field where "next-day" 
results are important, have 
lead to regular renewals. 



if ACTION is 

your aim in Madhon call Gen. Mqr. 
Bun Hovel or Headley-Reed. 



Tve 

n MADISON, WIS. 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



cc 



Advertising accounts have been flying thick and fast over the 
first half of this year, one of the most active periods for such 
shifts on record (see Sponsor-Scope). One agency which 
must have enjoyed the hectic infighting is Compton, an esti- 
mated S16 million richer. Its president: Bart Cummings. 

The newsmaker: Barton A. Cummings has been with 
Compton since 1947, rising to its presidency in 1955. The 6' 5", 210- 
pound, crew-cut, former All American football player from the U. of 
Illinois launched his advertising career in hometown Rockford, 111., 
as trainee in his father's agency. His pre-Compton experience in- 
cluded Benton & Bowles, where he began as office boy in 1936 and 
rose to copy supervisor by 1941. In 1945, after war time service, he 
joined the Maxon agency as account executive and was elected vice 
president the following year. 

During Bart Cummings' incum- 
bency as Compton president, the 
agency's billings have more than 
doubled. The figure was at $42 
million in 1947 when he took over 
the helm, and now, with the smoke 
beginning to clear after the first 
half s salvo of account shifts it ap- 
pears that the agency bills in the 
neighborhood of $95 million. 

This gain is especially dramatic 
because it took place despite some 
sizeable set backs (one gigantic I 

over the same period. Compton was dealt a crushing blow by loss of 
Standard Brands business amounting to about $6 million. Also on 
the debit side were Ruppert Brewing, worth about $1 million, and 
Black & White Scotch, valued at somewhat less than $1 million, both 
of which took their advertising elsewhere this year. 

But the influx of new accounts and heightened billings from old 
clients have made Compton one of the hottest agencies around. Most 
recent acquisition was some $4 million in Seagram alcoholic bever- 
age business. Earlier in the year, by merging with Baker, Tilden. 
Bolgard & Barger in Chicago. Compton added Quaker Oats billings 
amounting to $6 million. The agency also picked up $5 million in 
Remington-Rand billings, for which company a tv plunge is contem- 
plated, and the SI million Asphalt Institute account, which is in 
radio. 

Other new accounts: Live Better Electrically (part of the Edison 
Electrical Institute account), worth $2.5 million; General Precision 
Instrument; Curtiss-Wright; Magnolia and General Petroleum Divi- 
sion of Mobile Oil. ^ 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




XAAfES 

GORDON 

could have been the " firecracker "of WPTR 

Bennett coined the word "fire-crackers" for his editorials in 
the New York Herald over a century ago. He could be writ- 
ing WPTR's radio editorials today. They're just as explosive. 



Bennett said what he thought without fear. WPTR feels that 
same obligation and follows that tradition of independence 
in every editorial broadcast over its air. Perhaps that's why 
it has become recognized as one of the outstanding news 
stations in America. Perhaps that's why more people listen 
to it than to any other station in the market according to 
Pulse. Perhaps that's why they trust it so much as well. 

The proof is simple and nobody says it better than an adver- 



tiser. At the local level WPTR carries more advertising than 
the next three stations combined. At the national level— 
WPTR sells more total time than the next 2 facilities put 
together. If you want to build a fire in this market— nothing 
will do it faster and better than WPTR. 

See your EAST/man for full details. Foster & Creed, in New 
England. 

VvCleTR 50,000 WATTS 
ALBANY-TROY- SCHENECTADY 

Duncan Mounsey, Exec. V.P. — A division of SCHINE ENTERPRISES. 




SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



In Chicago 




... the Art Institute boasts the world's largest collection of French 
Impressionist paintings. And over the years, it has painstakingly 
acquired a priceless collection of El Grecos — including his incom- 
parable masterpiece shown here— "The Assumption of the Virgin." 





In Chicago 

WGN 

RADIO 



reaches more homes 

than any other 

Chicago advertising medium. 



WGN IS CHICAGO 

Quality • Integrity • Responsibility 



MORE THAN 



- LOCAL 
EACH 
WEEK 




HOURS 



programming 



This is the PLUS faotor that makes 

WOC-TV more exciting — more 

interesting — more effective than the 

competit 



n. Yes, more local 



p=q 


zE'™ : 


~t:.„~ \ '" 


HUNnnVB ^ 



programming for homemakers, 

for sports fans, for youngsters . . . 

all this in addition to NBC, 

top ABC shows and the best of the 

syndicated shows. 

These are the people that buy 

products in the nation's 47th TV 

market. More than 2 billion dollars 

in retail sales ring on the 

retailer's cash register. Over 438,000 

TV homes are within the 42 

counties of WOC-TV's coverage area. 

And to help you get the maximum 

number of these dollars WOC-TV 

specializes in effectively co-ordinating 

and merchandising your buy at 

every level — the broker, wholesaler, 

direct salesman, key buyer as well as 

the retail outlet. 

Your PGW Colonel has all the facts, 

figures and other data as well as 

day by day availabilities. 

See him today. 



New, exciting- 

iraisie 

nso 



SPONSOR 




Secretary-Treasurer 

ciaine Couper Glenn 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 
John t. McMilhn 



Managing Editor 

Alfred J. Jarte 
Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Mibch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago 

Gwen Smart 



Associate Ed.t 

Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 
Ben Seff 
Lloyd Kaplan 
Walter F. Scanlon 



vice 



Barbara Wiggins 
Editorial Research 

Helene Etelson 
Barbara Parkinson 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMEN1 



Eastern Office 

Willard Dougherty 
Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 



Midwest Manager 



Western Man 

George Dietrich 



ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Massimino, Assistant to Publisher 
Laura Oken, Accounting Manager 
George Becker; Anne Marie Cooper; 
Michael Crocco; Syd Guttman; Wilke 
Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Dorothy Tinker; 
Flora Tomadelli 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



IN CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA 



* 



Clarksburg x Fairmont * Morgantown 




YOUR 

PRODUCT'S 

BEST 

FRIEND 

IS 



Tie FRIENDLY Group's 

A SHOPPER TOPPER STATION 



!<§. 



-JB Q 



IN CLARKSBURG: 

Roger Garrett-MAin 4-7573 
IN NEW YORK: 

Lee Gaynor-OXford 7-0306 

Represented Nationally: Avery-Knodel, Inc. 

In Television too, a station is known by the companies it keeps! 
Here at WBOY-TV onr sponsor list reads like the "Who's Who" 
in local and national advertisers. Yes, Iron City Beer, Lever 
Brothers, Ford Dealers, Gulf Oil, Carlings Beer, Domino Sugar, 
Carnation Milk, Hope Natural Gas, Procter and Gamble and 
U.S. Bubber are just a few of the firms who buy BOY to tell and 
sell 150,000 TV families in the heart of Central Wol \ :ima- 
families with almost ON E BILL ION DOLLARS TO SPE.ND. 

Member The FRIENDLY Group! Hjggjll ) John J. Laux, Managing Director 



1 


1 M 


1 


CHANNEL 9 


1 


The lowest cost television bridge to the 


■ 


Upper Ohio Valley's Five Billion Dollar retail ■ 




market. The best of CBS and ABC. Plus Shop- 


1 


per Topper Merchandising. B 


1 


John J. Laux, Exec. V-P. — AT 2-6265 | 


1 


Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. _ 


I 


■ 


1 


^v*^^r^^j|^ i 


1 


CHANNEL 12 1 


I 


28% taller and 29% more powerful. Tells | 


I 


and sells 152,000 TV homes who spend 750 m 
million annually. The best of CBS and ABC. B 


1 


Plus Shopper Topper Merchandising. Q 


I 


D. T. Knight, General Manager — MA 3-7260 ■ 
Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 




1 


1 




1 


I 


inrT!nnTi ■ 


I 


|VJ[i£1i wM 


I 
1 


CHANNEL 3 R 


More to see on Channel 3 with NBC. Domi- ' 


1 


nates the key corners of Tennessee, Georgia | 


1 


and Alabama where over a million people 


spend 800 million dollars. I 


1 


Harry Burke, General Manager — OX 8-1505 j 


1 
1 


Represented by H-R 


1 






1 




1 


CHANNEL 12 ■ 




Newest member of the FRIENDLY Group serv- m 




ing over a million people with 721 million ■ 
dollars to spend. The best of CBS and ABC 


1 


Networks. Z?j 


1 


Robert E. Metcalfe, Managing Oir.— TA 4-5432 | 




Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 


1 

1 


1 


I - 


I 


l\ T J| ■ 


1 


■ i 1 |1|I ■'■ 


1 


CHANNEL 12 


1 


A captive audience of 150,000 TV homes with 


1 


a spendable consumer income of almost One ■ 
Billion Dollars. The best of NBC and CBS. ■ 




Plus Shopper Topper Merchandising. 


I 


Roger Garrett, General Manager— MAin 4-7573 ■ 


Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc . 




1 



; SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




A legend in his own time. A per- 
sonality without par. Philosopher, 
■ ws maker, catalyst, 
■'. listener an imme- 
(,inf ' onal participa- 

nt enough, he 
the greatest 
m in broadcasting history. 
is the kind of 



by Joe Csidi 



Sponsor 



Our up and coming radio/tv stars 



I ong before he had sliced himself a goodly 
piece of national prominence by swinging "Mack, 
the Knife" I took the liberty of making reference 
in this space to a young performer named Bobby 
Darin. I said, on several occasions, that in my 
book Bobby was tomorrow's Sinatra. ^o\v, I 
have just foresaken the television set to make my 
weary way to this typewriter, completely con- 
vinced that I was right about Bobby, but with a somewhat stunning 
additional notion pinwheeling around in my head: Not only is Bobby 
tomorrow's Sinatra, but my generation (and it's performing favorites) 
is about to give way, gracefully I hope, to tomorrow's stars across „ 
the board. It occurs to me that this is an important fact for purchas 
ers of television shows and time for them to realize, too. 




Good match for the old-timers 



The purchasers of the 9:30 and 10:30 slot last Monday (27 June 
night on the ABC TV network were and are fully cognizant of this 
merchandising fact, for they presented a show called Coke Time 
starring Bobby and a half-dozen of the younger generation's newly 
developed stars. The old man of the group, appropriately enough 
was the singing master of ceremonies Pat Boone. Pat conducted 
himself with the restraint and dignity which becomes the elder states 
man of the new crop of song stars. He has reminded me, for the 
several years of his ascendancy, alternately of Perry Como and Bin: 
Crosby in their respective primes. And that night he did so morei 
than ever, and when he worked a wonderfullv developed duet will 
Bobby Darin, I could see Bing and Sinatra all over again. I hesitate 
to mark myself a traitor to my era, but I must confess that I thought 
Pat and Bobby were, indeed, better than Crosby and Frank, year 
for year. I think young performers, today, when they're good, have 
more on the ball than young performers of like age in my own day- 
Paul Anka, for example, who strikes me as being loveably ob 
noxious and over-confident, and without genuine humility, has a 
great deal of the same qualities of showmanship that Louis Prima 
has. But Louis in his earlier years was a pure trumpet blowing 
down, while young master Anka manages to convev the same sense 
of supershowmanship as the Preem, yet withal gets across a romantic 
message to the young lasses, who put out those piggy bank saving; 
to buy his records in the millions. 

Also on the expertly produced spec was thin, lithe, and likeable 
Frankie Avalon. This youngster reminds me of the earliest days of 
Dick Powell, although he has an even sweeter and more simple in 
nocent quality. And he is at least as good a performer considering 
his tender years. 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 196( 



' In the category of teen stars who can't sing at all, but who never- 
leless are teen heroes of the highest order are Ed Byrnes and Bob 
>enver, who are /were respectively the Kookie of 77 Sunset Strip 
ad the Maynard Krebs of Bobbie Gillis. I don't rightly know to 
diom, of my generation, these two idols might properly be com- 
ared. I can think of the Dennis Day of the old Jack Benny radio 
hows, and possibly the Charlie McCarthy of the old Edgar Bergen 
rograms, but somehow the comparisons lack validity. 

On the distaff side there was lovely Anita Bryant, who has just 
larried a bright disk jockey named Bob Green. You can mark it 
own right now that Anita will go everywhere that such a queen of 
ly own day as Dinah Shore has gone and continues to go. And 
long with Anita a teen-age miss named Annette Fucinello, late of 
he Disney shows and record hits ranging from "Tall Paul" to "0 
)io Mio" sang and danced. Again, in Annette's case, a truly sound 
omparison escapes me. 

The point I make, however, is that here was a show made up of 
i handful of the newer crop of performers. Kids who were born and 
leveloped in the much maligned rock 'n' roll years. I submit that un- 
ler the expert production hand of Nick Vanoff, the bright, young 
ind imaginative direction of Dwight Hemion, the knowledgable musi- 
cal efforts of Vic Schoen (he was the Andrews' Sisters musical con- 
ductor in their heyday), and Dick Williams (he did the choral 
vork), choreography with a fresh, teen air by Marc Breaux and 
Oeedee Wood, and intelligent and minimal scripting by John Ayles- 
ivorth, Herb Sargent, and Frank Peppiat — under this expert steering 
he youngsters presented a show which matched all but the two or 
hree (Fred Astaire, etc.) major spectaculars of the past season. 

submit, too, that the show will turn out to have delivered one of 
he healthiest ratings of the season, and that most of the adults who 
Watched it with any kind of an open mind at all will admit that it 
Was zesty and exhilirating, and had a charm and an eagerness to 
iplease that many a high budgeted spec with some of our older and 
more tired talent could well struggle to achieve. 



Can't but grow better 

I will not argue with the critics who will decry young Anka's 
jinterpretation of the lovely Rodgers & Hammerstein "Hello, Young 
jLovers," nor will I claim he treats it with the warmth and feeling 
Perry Como gave it the year it was written. I will not claim that 
(Pat Boone handled the difficult "Something's Coming," from "West 
jSide Story" with the authority or firm grasp an Alfred Drake or a 
John Raitt may give it. But these are small and carping criticisms. 

If you saw this Coke Time, you were seeing the singing stars of all 
-our tomorrows. These kids are good now, and they can do nothing 
but get better and better and better. And smart advertisers like 
Coca-Cola are going to find more and more ways of presenting them 
more and more effectively. ^ 



Letters to Joe Csida are welcome 
Do you always agree with what Joe Csida says in Sponsor Back- 
stage? Joe and the editors of SPONSOR will be happy to receive 
and print your comments. Address them to Joe Csida, c/o 
SPONSOR, 40 East 49th Street, New York 17. New York. 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



I 




SPORTS 
TINE 

Advertisers seeking a sports audi- 
ence for their sales message find it 
on CBS Radio. There's ex- Yankee 
Phil Rizzuto and Sports Time, Mon- 
day-Saturday. Through the weekend, 
Dave Camerer is heard 10 times 
with up-to-the-minute sports news. 
There's full coverage of events like 
Masters Golf, the Triple Crown, Se- 
bring Sports Car Races. In all radio , 
this is the kind of company you 

kep ONLY 
ON CBS 
RADIO 




PONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




BRAND-NEW: 

Out of the thousands of 

SATURDAY EVENING POST 

stories read and loved by millions 

of Americans, ITC now proudly 

brings to television first run, 

for the first time, the 







(EffaDHB 




The "best" known stars of Broadway and Hollywood appear in stories carefully selected by 
the Editors of the Saturday Evening Post from the works of famed "POST" authors like 
MacKinlay Kantor . . . James Warner Bellah ... Stephen Vincent Benet . . . Conrad 
Richter . . . Kay Boyle . . . Andrew Tully ... as ITC adds the dimension of television to 
the finest in popular fiction — "Best of the Post." 



ITC OF CANADA, LTO. 100 Unl 



INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 

3B Madison Avenue • New York 22 • N.Y. • PLaza 5-2100 
enue • Toronto I.Ontario • EMpire 2-1166 




I SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




WMTV REACHES THE 

HEART OF WISCONSIN 

AT THE LOWEST COST 

PER THOOSAND 

WMTV 

NBC IN 
MADISON, WISCONSIN 



FORWARD 



GROUP* 

anham Co. National Reps. 




Timebuyers 
at work 



Bob Stone, Compton Advertising. Inc., New York, urges buyers, 
reps and station executives to exert all pressure possible to maintain 
qnalitj programing for a full 12 months. "Buvers are now faced 
with the problem of the 'summer lag/ A recent national survey 
found that at summers lowest point. July-August, the viewing audi- 
ence level has dropped bv one- 
third of the maximum winter level. 
Early evening programing suffers 
the brunt of this attrition and 
prime time, although the peak of 
audience tune-in. is severely de- 
pleted because of the high propor- 
tion of network repeats. A pro- 
gram which earned a high rating 
during its original run cannot be 
expected to retain even a good 
percentage of its earlier sets-in-use 
figure. Moreover, summer replace- 
ments do not perform as well as winter shows with new material." 
Bob feels that buyers ought to be aware of what he terms, "the fal- 
lacy of late night preference. While early evening viewing is hurt 
because the potential audience is gathered around the family barbe- 
cue, the late night audience is not increased proportionately. Vir- 
tuallv the onlv 'good buvs* remaining open are news programs." 

Nancy Fugit, E. D. Gottlieb Co.. New York, believes many an aver- 
age campaign could have been outstandingly successful had better use 
been made of "the merchandising cooperation so often available 
from the station, and too often not used. Stations are as anxious for 
a successful campaign as the client and agencv, and take manv long 
and difficult steps to cooperate. 
They provide sales letters to im- 
portant outlets, merchandising de- 
tails to jobbers and wholesalers, 
coverage maps to clients" salesmen. 
and often a complete, powerful 
promotional campaign. This can 
open new accounts, cause heavy 
stocking up. and convince retailers 
to display and promote a product 
in order to capitalize on the cam- 
paign. The timebuyer, of course, 
has a wealth of material available 
in setting up a broadcast schedule. There's distribution coverage. 
extent of sales activity and available in-stock figures from the client: 
campaign objectives and a review of approved marketing come from 
account men: stations supply availabilities, program content, etc. 
But merchandising is the X : factor that can make the difference." 

sponsor • 11 JULY 1960 





TTK 



DU 



Nothing is quite like the sound of a healthy human 
heartbeat. To describe it they had to coin a word — 
"lub dub." 

We haven't found the proper single phrase to describe 
the sounds of the healthy, pulsating Greater Oklahoma 
City Market. 

Maybe it's the "clinking" of coins dropping into cash 
registers. 

Maybe it's the crisp rustling of paper money being 
invested in industrial expansion. 

Or maybe it's the sounds of WKY RADIO AND 
TELEVISION, in the role of prime communicators to 
the people of the market, aiding in the profitable sale 
and distribution of the products you have to sell. 

Whatever it is, it's a profitable sound, measured in 
dollars rather than decibels. That is the basis of this part 
of the story of the industrial and economic growth of the 
Greater Oklahoma City market ... a story of how WKY 
RADIO AND TELEVISION are selling more things to 
more people. 

This chapter is . . . 



FINANCE 



Economic expansion in Greater Oklahoma City . 



As sound as it is bright ! 



The growth and vitality of the market is shown in the volume of bank clearings 
as well as in the savings of its people. One shows the money in circulation. The 
other shows individual surplus available to spend. 




Bank Clearings — 

1959 $9,471,518,490 

1950 $4,696,653,017 

An increase of 101.7% 
Savings accounts in Savings 
& Loan Associations 

1959 $205,055,589 

1950 65,371,216 

An increase of 214% 



The expansion of Greater Oklahoma City is supported by a chain of dollars 
with no weak links. It starts with venturesome investors who have faith in the 
market creating business and industrial expansion. This leads to ever-increasing 
payrolls to people with the desire to spend and improve their family life. Through 
all of this there is the safety valve of diversification, so that no one industry setback 
can cause cash register cobwebs. 

Money-circulated and money-saved make Oklahoma City a good place in 
which to do more business. 

Reaching the people with money to spend is the first step in increasing your 
business. Some of the reasons WKY RADIO AND TELEVISION do this so 
effectively are told on page 4. 





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Our Business 
Is "HEARTBEATS 
AND FINANCE," too. 



We stay close to the hearts of our audience with fine 
local programming, public service, and genuine pride in 
our market. 

Because of this, WKY RADIO AND TELEVISION 
have a certain "authority" that furnishes sales power to 
sponsor's messages. 

The result is that dollar for dollar, WKY-TV and or 
WKY RADIO will outsell any other tv or radio station in 
the market. We're experts in the nicest kind of "finance" 
. . . making money for our advertisers. Which, in turn, makes 
money for us (last year, we enjoyed our biggest volume on 
both stations in history). 

It all adds up this way: The Greater Oklahoma City 
market is vitally prosperous . . . making, saving, spending 
money. WKY RADIO AND TELEVISION have more influ- 
ence on the people who live in this market than any other 
media. That's why ... OKLAHOMA CITY IS A GOOD 
MARKET IN WHICH TO DO MORE BUSINESS. 



Good Stations ON which to do More Business! 



K 



RADIO AND 
TELEVISION 



OKLAHOMA CITY 







PUBLIOATION* INC. 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE 



SPONSOR-SCOPE polled a cross-section of Madison Avenue last week on what 
they envisioned about the business for the next six months and their anticipations 
might be epitomized as follows: 

1 ) Consumer willingness to buy will still be high, but advertisers of big ticket mer- 
chandise in particular will gear their promotions more toward the hard sell and up 
their ad allowances in relation to sales — all of which favors spot. 

2) Inter-media competition will get rougher, even though total ad revenue will 
continue its upward course. There'll be more media merchandising, with a greater em- 
phasis on saturation and flights. 

3) Network spot carriers will spread in the evening areas, and, because of its in- 
creasing flexibility and lower costs in suiting the needs of the smaller advertisers, as well as 
the large, daytime network tv stands a good chance of recovering lost ground. You 
can also look for wider application of the dispersion technique. 

4) Despite the heat from network spot carriers, spot tv appears quite sturdy; in fact, 
buyers may find themselves faced with exceptionally tight situations in the upper mar- 
kets before the fall gets under way. 

Have you noticed lately how many radio stations have channeled their audience 
promotion into areas that have (1) a distinct community flavor and (2) a close 
identity with the entire family? 

Like voting for the highschool principal of the year, awarding sums to charities 

and other local interests on votes of the listeners, naming Mr. Good Citizen of the month 
or holding contests that affect some segment of community welfare. 

It's all a far cry from random guessing contests and treasure hunts, but some station op- 
erators hold that building listenership can't be done by programing alone, or individual prizes: 
the station must associate itself with the public or family welfare. 

Michigan Avenue had a pre-Fourth reverberation all its own: the $12-million 
Alberto-Culver account disclosed that it was on the lookout for a new agency. 

Among those bidding hard: Compton, Burnett and Tatham-Laird. The inside on 
the Avenue had it that Burnett looked like the white-haired boy. 

The transfer from Wade would be effective 1 September. A-C is 99% tv. 

Should Burnett haul in this one along with Schlitz, which appears on the way, 
there would be a wild scramble to hire more people. 

Look for a number of new products campaigns to come out of Chicago agen- 
cies soon. 

Among them: Kraft's Barbecue Sauce (FC&Bl ; Miles' Chocs (Wade) and Park- 
er's two new cartridge fountain pens and a ballpointer tipped with diamond dust 

(Tatham-Laird). 

Kraft newcomer will get intensive testing in the south and it'll be the first barbecue sauce 
with national distribution. 

Take it on the word of some agencymen, those little ads that fm stations run in 
their month's logs can have a lot to do with swinging an account. 

To the client it's tangible evidence that his participation is being merchandised, and 
that, anyway, he's getting a plus — because, as he views it, that little ad will be seen not 
once but several times. 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



23 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Station* aren'l going t<> tell him in so man) words, but Leslie Farnath, \\vr 
media V.p., isn't going to make much headway in his crusade for equal radio rate! 
Ireatmenl for national advertisers because of the anti-trust factor. 

Farnath told SPONSOR-SCOPE last week that he'd already heard from several reps ono 
the subject and what they had to say indicates "progress" for his request that the sta-* 1 
tfoni at least set up definitions for the categories that constitute national business. 

Bui what the station operators have "indicated" to their reps is this: even explicit 
categorizing wouldn't solve the problem until all the stations in the market agreed i 
on the same definitions. And doing that would be equivalent to collusive rate fixing, 
wlii< :h might be interpreted in the long run as counter to the Sherman anti-trust act. 

i For background on this theme see article, page 35, 13 June issue.) 

\t least in the midwest new national spot tv business moved at a nice pace. 

Among the availability calls and buying there were these: Stopette (E. H. Weiss), top I 
10 markets, starting this month; Quaker Oats (JWT), half-hours in the western markets, for 
Ken-L Dog Rations and Aunt Jemima Cake Mixes, replacing Award Theatre; Ameri- ] 
can 3 Vees Bird Foods (Grey), dozen markets for 13 weeks; Campbell's Barbecue Beans 
(NL&B). testing prime minutes in divers markets. 

In New York B&B was beefing up its commitments for Maxwell House Instant. 

It's official now: Kellogg's spot programing for the youngsters on 100 stations 
in the fall will include newcomer Mr. Magoo alongside Huckleberry Hound and 
Quick Draw McGraw. 

The buying (or renewal) of time for the strip will start about the middle of this month 
out of Burnett Chicago. 

It's been an exceptionally active first six months in the jockeying of accounts. 

For those more or less active in air media the realignments added up to around $95 
million, the most notable, of course being Chrysler lines, Pepsi-Cola and Shell. 

Included among the switchees with billings of Si million and over: 



ADVERTISER 


FROM 


TO 


ESTIMATED BUD( 


Chrysler Corp. 








Dodge Car 


Grant 


BBDO 


$17,000,000 


Dodge Truck 


Ross Roy 


BBDO 


4,000,000 


DeSoto-Valiant 


BBDO 


Ayer 


8,000,000 


Pepsi-Cola 


K&E 


BBDO 


13,000,000 


Shell Oil 


JWT 


OB&M 


12,000,000 


Simoniz 


Y&R 


DFS 


5,000,000 


Live Better Electrically 


F&S&R 


Conrpton 


3,000,000 


Promo Seltzer 


Warwick & L 


BBDO 


3.000.000 


Revlon 


LaRoche 


Warwick & L 


3.000.000 


B. T. Babbitt 


Brown & Butcher 


Geyer. MM&B 


3,000,000 


Remington-Rand Portables 


Factory 


Compton 


2,500,000 


Doyle's pet foods 


D'Arcy 


Lilienfeld 


2.000.000 


I'hai maCraft 


JWT 


Daniel & Charles 


2.000.000 


Hazel Bishop 


Raymond Spector 


Donahue & Coe 


2,000,000 


Lehn & Fink 


McCann-Erickson 


Open 


1,800,000 


Ekco Products 


DFS 


Doyle, Dane. B 


1.500,000 


< »l<l Milwaukee Beer 


Grant 


Gordon Best 


1,500,000 


\\ ilson Meats 


K&E 


Campbell-Mithun 


1,500,000 


Rival Packing 


Guild, B&B 


Needham, L&B 


1,300,000 


Roma Wine 


NC&K 


Doyle, Dane, B 


1,000,000 


Vsphalt Institute 


McCann-Marschalk 


Compton 


1,000,000 


Niagara Therapy 


Geo. L. Mallis 


Meldrum & Few smith 1,000,000 



24 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE c<m*med 



The big business scramble of the week among the three networks wag for that 
$1 million worth of daytime business from Betty Crocker's that General Mills 
(BBDO) had dangling. 

It would involve about 81 quarter-hours divided in two flights, one in the fall and 
the other in the winter. Products: the cake and muffin mixes. 



Now that Simoniz has picked its new agency — DFS — you can expect the tv networks 
to start pitching for a chunk of the $4 million in billings. 

One time a solid user of spot, Simoniz has been a sort of in-and-outer lately, with 
S. C. Johnson, DuPont and others meantime coming up as doutier competitors. 



Two afficionados of participations in or around tv kid shows — Chunky Choco- 
lates and Maypo^are pushing to get their spot schedules set for the fall as early 
as possible. 

Neither is starting until September but they're asking for confirmations now in- 
stead of waiting until mid- August, which would be the usual acceptance time. 

The consensus of reps: neither account should have a hard time getting acceptances quick- 
ly, because to the average station man a 13-week schedule isn't something you let slip 
by to a competitor. 

DCS&S has Chunky and Fletcher Richards, Maypo. 



Burnett may run into a little difficulty finding the spots it wants for Pillsbury 
cake mix in late evening fringe time around the country. 

The reason: Competitor Duncan Hines (Compton) has the cream in that area 
pretty well staked out for itself — and there's a big difference in what DH is spending 
as against Pillsbury. 

P.S.: P&G has found those fringe minutes not only a mighty good CPM but a potent 
geller of cake mixes to the features and Jack Paar addicts. 



Added cauge for sellers of spot tv to cry in their beer: Pabst and Blatz (K&E) 
have cut back on their spot schedule because of the American League football buy. 
TvB credits Pabst with $2.7 million gross in spot for 1959. 



ABC TV may have gone a long way for the coming season to diversify its variety of 
advertisers but it's still quite heavy with cigarette business. 

A point of measurement: of its 34 prime time programs 13 contain a cigarette maker. 

Daytime network tv may be getting more and more flexible in pricing and dis- 
persion but for some agency people it's getting to be an arithmetical nightmare. 

Their plaint: to figure out the net costs, after several layers of discounts and bonus plans, 
you need either a CPA or an IBM machine. 

What's become quite a gripe among Chicago reps this season: a growing tendency 
among a certain stripe of advertisers to use spot — both tv and radio— as merely a 
come-on for their distributors, jobbers and dealers. 

The gizmo: start an intensive schedule in multi-markets and, as soon as the blare of 
publicity has reached a crescendo or the product goes more or less national, suddenly cancel 
out on some flimsy excuse. 



11 JULY 1960 



25 






SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



MK I \ appnrrnth i« bent on unloading it* fall nighttime inventory even if i 
mi .m- rebating to clients already in the house. 

K<t instance, it'? cut the per commercial minute price of Riverboat to $20,00( 

' . "•( m ) and the Lone Westerner to $21,000 from $23,000, which means passing on th< 

benefits to sponsors who bought into these shows weeks ago. if these programs find new takers 

Mergers among agencies remained pretty much of a trickle during the fire; 
-i\ month- of 1960. 

•sient experts see the basic forces of industry militating against much mon 
merging of agencies — particularly those with diversified lists. 

The basic reasons they advance are these: 

1 ' As more clients merge with other companies or diversify their interest, the mon 
circumscribed becomes the agency's possibility of merging. The clients new lines, as 
a rule, expands the agency's area of potentially conflicting accounts. 

Small accounts find it less conducive to join big agencies. The latter just 
can't give them the type of service they expect, because the economics of the business require 
that the agency be operated on a departmental basis. In other words, the big agency can't 
make money if the account man has to do his own media buying, writing of commer- 
cials and what not. 

3) Most agencies still have a two-man or father-and-son image and because of their in- 
ability to offer stock and fringe benefit inducements it's tough for them to attract and 
hold top grade specialists. 

The first half year's mergers included: 

MERGED AGENCIES NEW NAME BILLINGS 

Compton: Baker. Tilden. Bolgard, Barger Compton $78,000,000 

Grey: Hartman Grey 50.500,000 

Anderson & Cairns: James T. Chirurg Chirurs-Cairn*. Inc. 11.000,000 

Needless to say. the cigarette manufacturers are keeping a close watch on the consumer 
reaction to Brown & Williamson's new Kentucky Kings. 

If this tobacco filter really takes off and it looks like a winner, the move to copy is bound 
to turn into another horse-race and a new flow of ad money. 

Looks like cigarette shipments in the first six months will be at least 4 r 7 ahead of the 
like period of 1959. which would mean a total of 480 billion cigarettes. 

Do you sellers of spot radio know what the agency media analyst's chief criti- 
cism of your statistical approach is? 

Its this: l ou talk too much average ratings, instead of pointing out the broad perspec- 
tive* of the medium's impact in the market and tying all this information up into a neat package. 

Like noting what the audience reach is in terms of all homes per week and 
what, particularly, this would be in an across-the-board buy on the basis of day and ni 
Nighttime could, in many markets, be made an important consideration in the across-the-board 
calculation on this score: the rating loss at night is not so intimidating since some sta- 
tions go off the air at sundown. 

Another thing: it would be helpful if stations got into the habit of including in 
their pitches updated information about the market's income, retail sales and special in- 
dustrial and worker characteristics. In other words, aid the media analyst to visualize the mar- 
ket as a purposeful buy for radio. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 8; 
Spot Buys, page 53: News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 64: Washington Week, page 59: SPONSOR 
Hears, page 62; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 74: and Film-Scope, page 60. 



PAID TESTIMONIAL FROM VICTOR ALESSANDRO FOR KPRC-TV, HOUSTON 




You perhaps know how we gently persuade 
ious people to say nice, sincere-sounding things 
t>ut KPRC-TV. WE PAY THEM MONEY! Take 
tor Alessandro. We approached the conductor 
The San Antonio Symphony recently while he 
> in Houston to guest-conduct the Houston 
nphony. He was rehearsing, and at first he 
itook us for a music critic and picked up his 
gest baton. But. we handed him a violin-case 
il of money and asked him to say something nice 
nit KPRC-TV. 

"Telerision?" he shouted. "Surely you're jok- 
.' Telerision is for children and grown-ups who 
ow no better. Do you mistake me for a 
itician?" 



3 PY PEANUT BUTTER 




We begged, we pleaded, we implored. Then 
we filled a bass-fiddle case with money. Dr. Ales- 
sandro agreed to watch Channel 2. "Viola!" he 
cried aloud. "Can this be television? It looks ex- 
actly like Mozart, or Beethoven. Why it would in- 
deed be a shame to waste this splendid art on 
children or unappreciative grown-ups. May 1 watch 
a little longer?" 

As Dr. Alessandro discovered (and you can. 
too) — KPRC-TV is the one television produced 
on purpose to please. KPRC-TV in Houston alone 
gives you the true, exact flavor of GRADE A 
television. 

No other television looks or sounds or stays 
pleasant and persuasive like KPRC-TV, because 
no other television is produced like KPRC-TV 



if you like TV, you'll love KPRC-TV, Houston 



'ONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




Philadelphiai^%)ld enough 

watch WCAU-TV. Result 

ad ults more often than am 

— j 

With 43% more adult quartei 

station . . . 98% more thai: 

big spending power is no 

the reason advertisers 

prefer Philadelphia's majoi 



to know good television 
WCAUTV reaches mor e 
lother station in the market. 



second 
is, 



bour firsts than th\ 
^he third station. I%ct 
minor matter. That 
iwho know the facts af life 
sales force... 




May we present 
Florence? 



Meeting Florence can be an exhilarating experience— f< 

your clients' television marketing problems, of course 

Heart of an agricultural-industrial area of 1,300,(X 

people in 30 counties, Florence is a 

single-station market with multiple attractions, 

not the least of which is 



^WBTW 

Florence, South Carolina 

Channel 8 • Maximum power • Maximum value 
Represented nationally by CBS TV Spot Sales 



A Jefferson Standard Station affiliate' 
WBT and WBTV, Charlotte. 








#• SPONSOR 

11 JULY 1960 




NO SECRET WEAPON: Tv creativity is largely credited with Shell Oil's move to Ogilvy, Benson & Math. 



TV: AGENCIES NEW BUSINESS-GETTER 



^ 'An agency's ability to creatively buy tv programs 
is its principal new business weapon,' adman says 

Does this mean the 'marketing revolution' is over? 
iDefinitely not — but it is now seriously challenged 



his week, on the heels of the Shell 
)il move to Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, 
lot of admen are beginning to sus- 
>ect a new pattern of motivations be- 
lind account shifts. Their reasoning: 
That while marketing may still be 
he heavyweight champion of the 
Jnited States advertising agency, it 
las met a very tough challenger who 

PONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



fights under the name of Tv Creativity. 

As one adman said to SPONSOR, "A 
smash television buy — a hit show, for 
instance — can scrap a client's care- 
fulh laid marketing plans overnight. 
A flop tv show." he added, "might 
possibly do the same thing." 

Said another: "When a small ac- 
count changes agencies, the reasons 



can be anything from a brother-in- 
law account exec to a discourteous 
switchboard operator. But when a 
giant account moves today, it's for a 
giant reason — and that reason usual- 
1\ is tv." 

Probably the strongest summation 
of the influence of tv creativity on the 
advertising scene was this from an- 
other top echelon agencyman: "At 
least for the next decade, an agency s 
ability to creatively buy tv program- 
ing will be its principal new business 
weapon." 

If they are right, do these new ap- 
praisals leave marketing departments 
of ad agencies scraping away as "sec- 
ond fiddle"? Does it mean that tv 

33 




IH SIN ESS -GETTERS: Tito 

new big accounts that came to 
BBDO this year are Pepsi-Cola 
and the Dodge division of Chrys- 
ler. Both of these clients are tv- 
oriented and connoisseurs of crea- 
tivity, {hove: Charles H. Brower, 
president and chairman of the 
BBDO executive committee. 
whose communications know-how 
is said to he the thing that brought 
this new business in. Below: 
Robert I., h oreman, executive p.p., 
creative services, whose ti savvy 
also suiirig Height for BBDO 




Bawj i- the <>nl\ key to agency 
growth? Does it mark the end of 
the "marketing revolution"? 

The answer is do. If it were true. 
then it would signal an era in which 
tin- onl) Burviving agencies would be 
th>- present mammoth ones, for the 
Bimple reason that only they can af- 
ford t\ departments that will satisfy 
demands of the big client companies. 
Remember that there are giant agen- 
<\r- which can afford a string of 
four to six attorneys in their legal 
departments who devote full time to 
studying and negotiating network 
telei ision contracts. 

What hope is there for the small or 
medium sized agency in such a pref- 
erential jungle? The answer lies in 
a new concept — the "tv-marketing 
mix." And the "tv" part of that mix 
is creativity. 

Ogilvy, Benson & Mather is a me- 
dium-size agency (total 1959 billings 
for the agencv were about $24 mil- 
lion: its rank as an air media in- 
vestor was about 27th i . Yet the S12 
million Shell Oil account came to 
OBM from a colossus as agencies go 
— J. Walter Thompson i total esti- 
mated 1959 billings of about $275 
million). 

The apparent paradox of this case 
is that — if tv ability is the key to get- 
ting and holding client business — 
then the cards should be stacked al- 
ways in favor of the big agencv since 
it can afford the tv department that is 
built to satisfy. So. some admen ask. 
what's Ogilvy doing with Shell? 

Those who have given it a lot of 
thought come up with this answer: 
Spot tv plus a reputation for tv crea- 
tivity for a competitor oil company. 

Shell is second only to Texaco in 
tv investments, is reported to spend 
t its air media budget in spot 
tv. In this medium. OBM has been 
making quite a name for itself recent- 
ly — especially with Maxwell House 
which came to it from B&B last \ear. 
In the recent first annual American 
Iv Commercials Festival and Forum 
conducted by Wallace Ross Enter- 
in d sponsor. OBM's Maxwell 
House commercials won in their divi- 
sion. 'See box page 35 for details 
on OBM's preliminaries on Maxwell 
House.) On top of this, OBM client 
tow departed from the agency 
••t to conflict with Shell i re- 
ados from press and industrv 
V| \\ non-network 



Play of The Week, a buy that ma' 
both agency and client look like thl 
twin patron saints of live tv dran 
and public service. The creativity q 
this t\ move was reminiscent of tl. 
earlier creative reputation Ogih 
once built in print circles on tb 
Hathaway eye-patch. 

For the most part, the growin 
client love affair with tv favors th 
larger agencies, which have personn* 
and facilities that make them nearl 
invincible to television Barry. Th 
moves this year of Pepsi-Cola an< I 
Dodge to BBDO, of General Motor 
institutional to Mc-E, point up thi 
fact. But the Shell-OBM weddin 
onlv proves, admen say. that tv crea 
tivity isn't necessarily measured 
square feet of agency floor space. 

This because tv creativity take 
many forms. There is creativity in sel 
ecting the right network show (this i 
growing in importance since net . 
works are in the show control sad 
die i . There is tv creativity in nego 
tiating for such shows. The agenc; 
with a powerhouse of show-wise 
show-biz executives stands a goo< 
chance of coming off with the mos 
successes. 

Then there is a creativity in spr> 
tv. Said one adman. '"There is mor< 
room for client-agency disconter 
where the client uses spot as his pr: 
mary medium than where the clie 
uses network tv." The reason is fair 
ly obvious. In a network buy, the cli 
ent usually has a voice in the sho 
selection, and. if something goes sour 
he has a hard time avoiding a share c 
the debacle. But in spot tv — largeb 
because of the complex, volatile na 
ture of the medium — the client is i 
clined to let the agency carry the bal 
If the ball is fumbled, the client usi 
ally is in the clear and can put all th< 
blame on the agencv. 

So creativity in spot tv is a usefu 
tool for digging up new accounts— 
where the prospective account alread. 
is spot-oriented. Spot tv creativit. 
takes many forms. An agency 
good show sense in syndication car 
build up a good creativit) score wftrj 
both national and regional advertis 
ers. 

A creative tv commercials depart 
ment is another "must" for the ager 
cy — big or small — bent on holding 
and getting business. A recent exan ij 
pie of this was the promotional effor 
by 1 &R in trade magazines and news 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 196 



I apers calling attention to the 17 

wards it took in the American Tv 

lommercials Festival and Forum. 

, Pith Y&R's impressive track record, 

h\ this stress on tv commercials? 

Because of the volatile nature of 

Revision," one adman explained, 

advertisers ask many more questions 

?! bout it than they do about print, and 

lot of these questions are about the 

ommercials. It is understandable 

lat they feel more comfortable okay- 

ig a print ad than a tv storyboard. 

"'Tie print ad, whether in layout or 

roof form, is exactly what readers 

L -ill see: the tv storyboard is a long 

a\ from the finished commercial, 

iid the client must have a lot of 

1 ! aith in the agency to believe that 

. t'll come out all right." 

: How does an advertising agency 

' over all these creative tv bases? A 

L "ood example is McCann-Erickson 

" e J Vhich has set up, through strong per- 

onnel, a pattern for the new "mar- 

' :eting-communications mix" that 

nam in the industry feel will be fol- 

>w.'i! by more and more agencies. 

1 A glance at part of the powerhouse 

hat makes up the communications 

ide of the team shows how heavy it 

'•" s in broadcasting experience: 

10t ] • Sylvester (Pat) Weaver, now a 

mmnunications expert on a world- 

ride scale but practically synony- 

aous with television since his years 

[a J| leadership at NBC TV. 

• Frank White, vice chairman of 
.Jr-K's board, who once was treas- 
arer of CBS, president of NBC, and 

r ^resident of Mutual Broadcasting. 
? e " • Matthew (Joe) Culligan, general 

\t( utive of the agency, who came 
; " here from NBC, where he had headed 

NBC Radio, and before that, on the 

1 side, had worked closely with Pat 

Veaver in creating Today. 

• Thomas McAvitv, agency vice 
1 President, was formerly executive 

;ice president of NBC TV in charge 
•f programing. 

• Robert Mountain, another vice 
(resident, had been vice president of 
elevision programing for Y&R. 

• Jack Van Volkenburg, president 
if M-E Productions (tv and radio), 
s a former president of the CBS TV 

■ ,ir [ letwork. 

• Robert Elliott, another vice pres- 
dent, came to Mc-E via CBS and 
'ime. This sort of all-star line-up in 
igency communications is indicative 
')f the emphasis which is currently be- 



OBM'S MAXWELL HOUSE KICK-OFF 




'THE MIXER': David B. McCall, v.p. and associate copy chief at OBM. at recent AMA 
meeting outlined what his agency did, when it got General Foods Maxwell House 
Coffee account. Some in industry believe it was instrumental in getting Shell account 



About a year and a half ago, General Foods gave the 
agency the Maxwell House account. First they studied the 
precedents. Every piece of coffee research and campaigns 
done for the brand over the past 50 years were analyzed. 
All competitive advertising was examined. Second step was 
a visit to the client. The agency spent considerable time ob- 
serving the complex process of manufacturing coffee . . . 
we were even allowed to enroll the a/e and copywriter in 
a course in the coffee business. 

Step three: they conducted research; 32 copy premises 
were prepared, including the premises of leading competi- 
tors. All were tested for relative selling strengths. . . . 

The research next was consulted. If a clear winner has 
emerged — and judgment presents no overwhelming obsta- 
cles — use it. In this, two premises finished far out in front. 
One was a generic premise which had no clear advertising 
usefulness. The second was a much sharper and more indi- 
vidual premise . . . stemmed from a genuine product advan- 
tage; it ivas, "It tastes as good as it smells." The agency 
elected to proceed ivith this premise. 

At this point, not one word of copy had been written . . . 
not one rough storyboard executed. Many different transla- 
tions of the basic premise were prepared. The creative 
process was not stifled by the research that preceded it. 



W (SPONSOR 



• 11 JULY 1960 



35 



in- put on television advertising. 

•\\ ben .1 big account 'and mod 
big .1. ■ ..mi!- eithei are tv-oriented or 
tv-interested ) invites an 
Bake a piti li foi it- busini 

man told SPONSOR, "one of the first 

h a < lienl asks i-. '\\ bal 
jroui 1 1 .i< k in ord in tele\ ision?' <>r if 

•.[Mil i- lii- main t oncei D 'How air 

\i.u -it up in your t\ department? 
\\ ith t\ tli*- \>>. I impact medium, 
-in h questions musl be expected. 

"I>ut tlii- doesn't mean tin- prospec- 
tive client won't want t<> Imon all 
about tin- agency's marketing and re- 
sean h Bet-ups a- well 

,li\ it\." lit- unit <»n. M maj 
be tlw moat important factoi i;i get- 
ting ,i big Bl ' "iint. hut it must he 
documented and supported bj -<>lid 
marketing. Otherwise >ou're just 
whistling in Dixit-." 

Tin- creative-research lilend is the 
blueprint at the Ogihrj agencj also. 
In i recent debate at an American 
Marketing Association meeting in 
New ITork, David \hCall. OBM dee 
president and copy chief, took the 
position that research and creativity 
go hand in hand. 

"Cop] research must never be 
removed from the healing touch of 
common sense," he said. "It is a 
vital part id the creative process. But 
it i- not, in it-elf. the creative process." 

In the box on the preceding page 
i- \h (all- outline of OBM's prelimir 

n.it \ Work on tin- Maxwell House 

coffee account for client General 
Foods. What resulted from this ex- 
pensive research, during which many 
premises were studied, was a single 
premise to consumers. 

'"The agency," said McCall, "did 

not present a number of execution-. It 

did not present a number of different 

It presented one premise 

• omniercial— and it knew 

res ear< h told it -o. 

explains, "is the 
i 

is 

must be cre- 

prodlll t. 

"can defu ,m-t which 

advertisinj 

r 



•' 



TEN SECONDS THAT 
SHOOK MADISON AVE 

^ Agencies bristle as ABC TV moves to once-nightl 
40-second chainbreak; over-commercialization charge 

^ ABC affiliates welcome increased revenue from sal« 
of two 20's; trend toward all 40-second breaks seer 



^%d\ertisinj: agencies voiced a loud 
chorus of opposition la-t week over 
ABC TV's plan for 40-second station- 
breaks in the nighttime schedule. 

Admen warned that adding 10 sec- 
onds to station breaks before the last 
show of the evening was a dangerous 
step toward over-commercialization 
and might open a Pandora's box of 
longer stationbreaks. There were 
even statements that if this went any 
further, advertisers might begin to 
look elsewhere than tv for better ad- 
vertising values. 

The tempest stirred by ABC. ac- 
cording to insiders, was particularly 
hazardous for the ad business at this 
time because of the anti-advertising 
mood in Washington. This was seen 
as adding strength to the agency pro- 



CBS HOLDS LINE 




CBS reaction to ABC proposal, as stated by 
station relations vice president Carl Ward, 
is to hold the line t *he 30-second break 



test but high hopes of dissuading tl 
network from this source were scan 
along Madison and Michigan Ave: 

ABC. loath to discuss this sensitiv 
subject for the record with the presi 
attributes its action to the need t 
"maximize clearances/' according 
its explanatory letter to agencies. Son 
consider it also a bid for affiliatu 
in two-station markets from which 
is now excluded, since the addition 
10 seconds, with possibly more 
come, can bring thousands of dolla 
into station coffers in the course of 
year's time. 

Many stations look at ABC's acti< 
as the beginning of a trend towa 
all 40-second breaks. Thev see it as 
well-deserved chance to recoup bu 
ness losses they've sustained throuj 
network sale of participations, ai 
the spread of longer programs whi< 
has cut the number of stationbreak 
And they reply to advertiser disple? 
ure over this new move with the £ 
sertion that it will enable them 
provide additional time for advert 
ers and avoid rate increases. 

Agency media officials, virtuallv 
a man, see their clients' on-netwo 
message as suffering "dilution" frc 
an additional 10 seconds of bre. 
time. And there is widespread fe 
the 40-second length will encoura 
triple spotting. ABC recommends tl 
period be used for two 20's or a 
and a 10, but, exclaims one med 
man. "The 30-second spot is uncor 
mon and if a station can sell only oi 
20 for a break, what a temptation 
stick in two 10's!" 

Among agencies reportedly prote 
ing to ABC were Bates, BBDO, B^ 
and Compton. 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 



Ill 



l!' 



TYPICAL AGENCY REACTION TO ABC TV PLAN 

Below in its entirety: a letter from a large Madison Avenue agency, [ following its next-to-last show each evening. The opinions listed 
which cannot be identified, to Henry Hede, ABC TV v.p., regarding here of the proposed 40-second station break, scheduled to be in- 
the network's plan to augment by 10 seconds the station break ] augurated next fall, are representative of over-all agency reaction 

"In your June \lth letter announcing ABC Television s institution of the ^O-second station 
break prior to the start of the last ABC TV program each evening, you stated that you know 
we will recognize that 'this plan will be in the best interests of the advertisers, the stations, 
and ABC Television.' We regret to advise that on this point we could not disagree with you 
more. 

"As an agency responsible for the advertising investments of approximately (deleted) 
clients, we have always deplored the practice of multiple spotting. It is our feeling that this 
practice dilutes the effectiveness of all advertisers involved which, in turn, must necessarily di- 
lute the effectiveness of the medium itself. As a consequence, it would seem to us that if this 
practice ever became widespread, advertisers would inevitably be forced to look to other media 
for more efficient and effective advertising values. 

"Furthermore, in view of the criticisms that have been leveled at the industry by the pub- 
lic as well as by responsible government officials for just such practices, we cannot understand 
how ABC Television can justifiably maintain that its new policy is in the best interests of the 
stations, advertisers and the network. Instead, we are inclined to believe that this move by ABC 
Television will compound an already unhealthy situation, thereby increasing the grounds for 
criticism with the result that the industry as a whole will suffer accordingly. 

"The fact that your network is faced with certain station clearance problems is well-known 
in the trade; the fact that advertisers in general have confidence that ABC will overcome these 
problems is attested by the share of business these advertisers have placed with you. We, of 
course, share this confidence, but cannot agree that this is the way to solve your problem. We, 
therefore, believe that we have no other alternative but to voice our disappointment upon re- 
ceipt of your June 11th letter as well as our sincere hope that this letter will prompt your 
serious reconsideration regarding this policy." 



Should the plan go through, ABC 
:an probably expect especially sharp 
;riping from advertisers whose par- 
icipations immediately precede the 
engthened stationbreaks. Nearly 
everyone contacted expressed a de- 
sire for airtime as far away as possi- 
ble from heightened spot television 
ompetition. 

Evidently, final details have not yet 
i>een worked out, for there are a num- 
ber of theories extant on how the new 
»lan will operate. ABC's letter to 
agencies indicates the extra 10 sec- 
onds are to come from the next-to- 
jast program each night. Some think 
';his refers to the entertainment por- 
jion of the shows, while others say 



PONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



the time is to be obtained from the 
network promo which appears at the 
tail end before cutting to the stations. 

Likewise in doubt is how the I.D. is 
to be handled in a break consisting of 
two 20's. There are those who think 
two seconds will somehow be left 
over, possibly from cutting a camera 
cue on the show. Others expect one 
of the 20's may have to be cut to an 
18 to accommodate station identifica- 
tion, which raises the question of 
the cost of a reduced 20. 

The shows to be shaved, with the 
exception of The Detectives, are net- 
work controlled, so little trouble is 
anticipated in the mechanics of the 
operation b nd the possibly stormy 



protest being kicked up by Procter & 
Gamble and Benton & Bowles over the 
fate of that show. The programs 
affected: The Islanders (Sunday, 
10:30) ; Adventures in Paradise 
(Monday, 10:30); Stagecoach West 
(Tuesday, 10) : Hawaiian Eye (Wed- 
nesday, 10) ; The Untouchables 
(Thursday, 10:30); The Detectives 
(Friday, 10:30); Saturday Night 
Fights. 

Station reps expect that if the ABC 
plan goes through, and they seem 
convinced it will, affiliates of other 
tv networks will use this as an en- 
tering wedge to gain a similar night- 
time bonus. Station relations officials 
(Please turn to page 75) 

37 



Part I of a two-part series: 



Who scored in Commercials Festival 






I Uj U //«■ //>>/ o/ f/ tuo-part an- 
ah iu o/ '///»• tmerican Tv Commer- 
cial* Festival results. In the 18 /w/y 
issue, I//. Ro« /</'// analyze trends in 
techniques. In sponsor's iu Media 
tsue <>/ 25 July, the complete 
list •>! 83 (toon* 1 Winners will be 
printed, with advertiser, agency and 
production company credits. 

by WALLACE A. ROSS 



Eighty-three Awards Certificates 
for product category dinners and 
rnnners-up plus Special Citations for 
production craftsmanship are being 
mailed tins week to agencies and pro- 
ductioD companies credited with win- 
ning entries in the First American 
T\ Commercials Festival & Forum, 
in Vu York this past 18-20 May. 



^ Here are complete details on the firms who received 
award certificates in American Tv Commercials Festival 

^ The big Madison Ave. shops and major producers did 
well but smaller companies were also well represented 



\nother 250 Certificates of Recog- 
nition for commercials selected 
among the top 250 of 1959-60 and 25 
certificates for those selected as Com- 
mercial Classics will also be delivered 
to the companies which entered them. 

Analysis of these winners evidences 
a pleasing spread of the awards 
throughout the nation. Although the 
very large agencies and production 
companies, with a few exceptions, 
gathered their expected share of com- 
mendations, the gamut of those hon- 
ored runs also to firms located in 
Minneapolis, Albuquerque. Oklahoma 
City. Memphis, Holyoke, Mass., 
Sioux Citv. Dallas, and Toronto. 

Among the agencies, five branch 
offices of Young & Rubicam won a 
combined total of 17 awards and 47 
certificates for top 250 and Classic 
selections. BBDO's New York and 



San Francisco branches totaled a 
strong second with eight awards and 
34 certificates. J. Walter Thompson's 
Chicago and New York branches won 
eight awards also, along with a total 
of 26 certificates. Representative of 
non-New York agencies whose work 
was touted highly was Meldrum & 
Fewsmith of Cleveland, Campbell- 
Mithun of Minneapolis, Belmont Ver 
Standig of Baltimore, and Henri. Bur- 
ley & McDonald of Toronto, creator 
of the "Best Commercial for the Ca- 
nadian Market." 

Among the production companies, 
the combined film and (now-discon- 
tinued I videotape arms of the Elliot. 
Unger & Elliot Division of Screen 
Gems, New York, scored a signal 
success by capturing nine Awards, 
placing 16 commercials in the top 
(Please turn to page 75) 



GEOGRAPHIC PATTERN OF ENTRIES, AWARDS 



Area 


No. of 


1327 

No. of 
Commls. 


ENTRIES 


Commls 


Advfrs. 




AWARD W 

Agencies 


riNNERS 

Prodrs. 


\. Y. 


40 


424 


40 


374 


2 


6 


17 


18* 


w. a > ast 


10 


59 


21 


131 






7 


16* 


MIDWEST 


13 


129 


3 


16 


1 


4 


7 


2 


EAST 


11 


68 


4 


16 






4 


2 


8. ,\ 8.W. 


10 


61 


3 


11 






3 


1 


CANADA 


4 


13 


4 


12 






3 


1 


El ROPE 


1* 


TOTALS 


88 


757 


75 


560 


3 


10 


41! 


41* 



■ i or received. Two agency submission were, however, produced all or partially in Europe, and one of these shared 
- i '■'.•luoer. Also there were two other ties and two other awards co-produced, 
lirectly for an advertiser, no ■cancy involved. 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 196(1 



ANALYSIS OF AWARD WINNERS, BY AD AGENCIES 



Company & No. 
Branches Entering 


Total 4 ' 


Winners & 
Citations 


Runners-up 


Honorable 
Mentions 


Top 250 


Cassics 


Total 5 
Certificates 


Y&R (5) 


17 


7 


8 


2 


25 


5 


47 


BBDO (2) 


8 


1 


4 


3 


25 


1 


34 


JWT (2) 


8 


5 


3 


X 


1«"» 


X 


26 


CAMPBELL-EWALD (2) 


4 


3 


1 


X 


4 


1 


11 


CAMPBELL-MITHUN 


3 


2 


1 


X 


11 


1 


15 


McCANN-ERICKSON (3) 


1 


X 


1 


X 


1 1 


1 


16 


K&E 


2 


1 


X 


1 


9 


X 


11 


BENTON&BOWLES 


4 


1 


2 


1 


8 


1 


13 


DOYLE DAISE BERNBACH 


3 


1 


1 


1 


7 


X 


10 


OGILVY B&M 


2 


1 


X 


1 


7 


1 


10 


EWRR (2) 


3 


3 


X 


X 


6 


X 


9 


MELDRUM & FEWSMITH 


3 


2 


1 


X 


4 


X 


7 


REACH, McCLINTON 


2 


1 


X 


1 


5 


X 


7 


BURNETT (2) 


1 


1 


X 


\ 


5 


X 


6 


ESTY 


2 


X 


1 


1 


4 


2 


8 


KNOX REEVES 


2 


2 


X 


X 


3 


X 


5 


D'ARCY (3) 


2 


X 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


JACKSON 


2 


2 


X 


X 


2 


X 


4 


DCS&S 


2 


1 


X 


1 


1 


X 


3 



GREY ] 


X 


1 


X 


4 


X 


5 


GUILD B&B ] 


X 


1 


X 


4 


X 


5 


FOOTE, C&B (3) ] 


1 


X 


X 


4 


X 


5 


HENDERSON ] 


X 


1 


X 


2 


X 


3 


DANIEL & CHARLES ] 


1 


X 


X 


1 


X 


2 


ROSENGARTEN, STEIN KE 1 


L 1 


X 


X 


1 


X 


2 


HENRI, BURLEY & McD ] 


L 1 


X 


X 


1 


X 


2 


JF/1RI> H/CKS ] 


X 


X 


X 


1 


X 


2 


McCANN-MARSCHALK ] 


L X 


X 


1 


1 


X 


2 


FER STANDIG 


L X 


1 


X 


X 


x 


2 



i 1: JWT (Chi.) 4; BBDO (N.Y.I 



Notes— Y&R (N.Y.) won 11 Awards; Y&R. (Chi.) 1: Y&R (LA ) 1: Y&R (Toronto) lj Y&B (Montr.) 1; JWT 
won li; McCann-Erickson (N.Y.i won 1; EWRR (N.Y.) won 2; EWRR i LA i won 1: Burnett iClii.l "on 1. «R 
total certificates. First column is total of following three. Last column is total of preceding five. 

Additionally: These companies placed one or more commercials among the Top 250 & Commercials Classics: N. W. Ayer (7)-, Needham, 
Louis & Brorby (6); Compton (5); MacManus, John & Adams (3); Fuller & Smith & Ross (3); Fletcher Richards, Calkins & Holden (3); 
D-F-S (2); Gumbinner (2); Cunningham & Walsh (2); Warwick & Legler (2); Taitham-Laird (2); Wade (2); Miller, Mackay, Hoeck & Hartung 
(2)- McLaren- Buchan-Thomas; Sherman & Marquette; Bates; Kudner ; Mogul; Norman, Craig & Kummel; Donahue & Coe ; Cargill, Wilson; 
Krupnick; Lang, Fisher & Stashower; Mathes; Zimmer, McClaskey; Gardner; North; Pitluk; MacFarland-Aveyard; Ketchum, Macleod & 
Grove; Bauer & Tripp; Weinberg; Schaller-Rubin; Noble-Dury ; Hicks & Greist; Taylor, Norseworthy; Lowe Runkle (all 1). 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



ANALYSIS OF AWARD WINNERS, BY PRODUCERS 



/ / &E. V. Y. 



I'l I) HOI >/./!. 

uro. v >. 

/ ill in \< i . \. ). 

Ml I v i III. 



II GRAPHICS. N.Y. 
n SPOTS, LA. 



I \l\ ERS AL, LA. 
U IRNERS. I. t. 



VE1 SFfLM f S. 4. \. y. 

SARRA. ( HI. 



I URBAN KS. LA. 
( ISCADE. LA. 



/>/sNM. /. 1. 



28 



18 



13 



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4 


4 


X 


X 


8 


X 


12 


km patin,l (. 




3 




2 


X 


6 


2 


11 


S IHH I. \. ). 




2t 




1 


X 


5 


1 


8 


pi i h in, v. r. 




2 




1 


1 


6 


1 


9 


* /;* i r«pej, v. y. 




2 




X 


1 


i 


X 


9 


m IISSFILM-CAR., N 


. Y. 


2 




X 


1 


7 


X 


9 


KM / 11 lit. IS. Y. 




2 




2 


X 


2 


X 


4 


IIU Tape). LA. 




2 




X 


X 


2 


X 


4 


1 PI, V >. 




2 




1 


X 


X 


X 


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rn /// m. v j. 




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hi IH.I 11. \. Y. 




2* 




2* 


X 


5 


X 


■ 


ST A (Tape).y. Y. 




2 




1 


1 


5 


X 


i 


1 1 1 KlliA.N. Y. 




2 




1 


X 


3 


X 


5 


1. itt HIM I. TORONTO 


2} 




X 


1 




X 


4 


GR INTR DI.IU R.. 


LA. 


2} 


2* 


X 


X 




1 


4 


MGM,LA. 




1 


X 


1 


X 




X 


6 


GRAY4TREILLY, V 


Y. 


1 


X 


1 


X 




X 


2 


DENOVE, LA. 




1 


X 


1 


X 


2 


X 


3 



DESILU. LA. 


1 


1 


X 


X 


7 X 


8 


t.l t:si\k. HOLL i\I> 


1* 


X 


1* 


X 


L X 


2 


HOIHI. WASH. 


1 


X 


1 


X 


L X 


2 


MU (Tape), LA. 


It 


X 


X 


1 


X 


2 


1 4N PRAAG, N. Y. 


1 


1 


X 


X 


2 


7 


GIFFORD-K1M, N. Y. 


1 


X 


1 


X 


J X 


3 


mi ' K. TV L)T.,LA. 


1 


X 


1 


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X 


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KGGM-TV, iLBQ. 


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2 


FREBERG, LA. 


1* 


1* 


X 


X 


2 1* 


4 


MAmui, rordlMKri Urn. 


AfllUta- 




red with Playhous 


i; total awards for NBC [» 







s total of pr«*>Jr - 

Additionally; These companies placed one or more commercials among the Top 250 — Columbia-Screen Gems. LA (6); Pintoff. NY (4); 

- 4 r ilmways, NY (3); Quartet, LA Q); National Screen, NY; Group. Detr.; Audio. NY: UPA. LA : Dolphin, NY: Jamieson. 
mime, LA; DeFrenes, Phila.; Keitz & Herndon, Dallas; Four Star. LA; Videotape Ctr. NY (2 each): Swift-Chaplain. LA: Fine 
^-ider, Colo.: WCD. NY; Dimka. France-, Fennell. LA ; HFH. NY; McCrary. NY; Reid Ray. Mpls. : Goulding-Elliott-Graham. NY; 

10, NY; Signal, LA; Lou Lilly, LA ; Format, LA; WKY-TV, Okla.; TV Commercials. Inc.. LA; Roland Reed. LA; Peter Elgar. 

- MY (1 each). 



' ':.. '. , i'liiiii -.;;: 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



Who likes public service shows? 



^ Critics and pros seem to like tv's public service 
programs more than the public, new surveys indicate 

Viewers prefer entertainment, but they still like 
public service shows aired on weekends during the day 



I wo new television audience sur- 
I r eys were circulating last w T eek as 
television Personal Interviews and 
WHIO-TV, Dayton, further docu- 
mented viewer thinking on public 
service programing at both the na- 
ional and the local viewing levels. 



The results re-pose the question of 
whether television should give the 
public what it "wants" or what it 
"needs." The public seems to have the 
answer: it wants entertainment more 
than educational or cultural shows, 
and it wants the latter on weekends 



during the day rather than in prime 
time. Conclusions of the surveys: 

1. Viewers are predominant en- 
tertainment-prone, preferring — with 
large margins — the standardized pro- 
grams centered on detective, adven- 
ture, variety, musical, western and 
dramatic themes to the educational 
and informational formats. 

2. But viewers have been condi- 
tioned to public service programs, 
and welcome them as a weekend di- 
version in their viewing habits. They 
prefer to watch these programs on 
Sunday or on Saturday during the 
daytime rather than prime time. 



TWO STUDIES ON PUBLIC SERVICE PROGRAMING 

A. National survey: Viewers like public service on weekends during the day* 

PREFERRED DA\f Sun . Mon . Tues . W ed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. 



Men 


32.6% 9.3% 


10.3% 


10.3% 


8.6% 


12.7% 16.2% 


Women 


29.6 12.7 


7.9 


13.5 


7.3 


12.5 16.5 


PREFERRED TIMEi 


6 to 8 p.m. 




8 to 11 p.m. 




Daytime 


Men 


34.7% 




26.5% 




38.8% 



Won 



•Conducted in seven markets by Television Personal Intervie 
■fTotal responses: 291 male. 504 female. 
JTotal responses: 219 male. 380 female. 



B. Local study: Dayton viewers prefer entertainment to public service* 

Program type First choice Second choice Third choice Fourth choice 



Detective, adventure 


21% 


17% 


16% 


18% 


Variety, musical 


15 


19 


16 


13 


Western 


15 


15 


13 


17 


Neivs, panel, forum 


9 


6 


6 


5 


Family type 


8 


9 


13 


12 


Dramatic 


8 


9 


8 


8 


Educational, informative 


7 


8 


8 


6 


Comedy 


7 


8 


8 


10 


Sports 


7 


5 


4 


3 


/Vo answer 


3 


4 


8 


8 



•Conducted by WHIO-TV. Dayton, : 



s city and suburban residents in February. 1960. a 



sailed questionnaire si 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 






I I'l. aftei survej in- adult men and 
moid, ii in more khan 2,000 homes lo- 
cated in ieven major-market areas, 
makes thi~ conclusion : 

- don't prefer educational 
ami intellectual programs broadcast 
in prime time. Onl) the small seg- 
ment ol the viewing population that 
i* strong!) predisposed to \\u- type 
of programing is willing to give up 
regulai entertainment programs to 
ne educational and intellectual offer- 
ings in i'i ime time. 

Sunda) is the <la\ preferred for 
public sen ice tele* asts bj II — ' oi 
tin- people responding to the TPI per- 
sonal interviews. The largest share 
of these \ iewers 38.3' i of them 
w > >ul<l like i" Bee these programs dur- 
ing the daytime hours. Men and 
women Beem to have bighTj similar 
tastes in both these area-. TP1 re- 
ports. I lif patterns held true also in 
another portion <>f (he survej which 
queried \ iewers as i" which i\ pe of 
programing they'd like to be watch- 
ing "righl now" — opera-education- 
symphonj or famirj comedy. View- 
ers in the first group preferred to 
have public service during prime time 
periods from 8 to 1 I p.m.. while those 
naming famih comedy checked day- 
time for public sen ice. 

rhese seven-city patterns are re- 
flected in the one-market studv con- 
ducted for WHIO-TV, Dayton. Sub- 
jects "f the stud) were viewers with- 
in tin- station telecast area, and the 
project was undertaken to "see how 
their opinions compare with the wide- 
tj publicized national criticism of 
tekn ision programing.' 1 

I! II. Moody, executive 
vice president, who comments: "Re- 
Bults were enlightening and encour- 
aging. Daytonians a- a whole are not 
overlj critical of programing even 
though tluir ta-tes and opinions dif- 
fer widelv. \ iolence came i,, for a 
low percentage «.f criticism, and cer- 
tainK there i> „,, - r . .it demand local- 
1\ for a top-heav) schedule of cul- 
tural and edw ational pri 

I Ii-- \\ UK)- 1 \ sui vej concludes: 

• There was little evidence of 
widespread condemnation of t\ p ro . 

eraini,i L . as a ul,,,l, v ».. 
'" all) critical. 

• I he majoritj oi 
npon tv primarily u i 
entertainment ami relaxation. 

f Please turn t<< . 






HOW TO SELL KIDS 
MACARONI (ON TV) 



^ Buitoni shifts tv emphasis to exploit Western moth 
in 20-market kid show buy for Wagon Wheels macaroni 

^ Wagon Wheels switch to tykes results in sales hike 
of 800%, expanded distribution for entire Buitoni line 



I he current success of Wagon 
Wheels macaroni represents an ideal 
mating of marketing concept to me- 
dia strategy. 

The concept: exploit the inherent 
kid-appeal qualities of a product pre- 
viously marketed to adults. The ex- 
ecution: re-design the package and 
follow through with a large-scale cam- 
paign concentrating on the medium 
geared to tell the story best to the 
pre-teen set — and watch out for the 
fireworks. 

Today, not quite one year after the 
campaign's inception (August 59 i . 
Wagon Wheel sales show an increase 
of 800%. A new wing has been 
added to the Buitoni plant, already 
operating seven days a week in order 
to meet the hurgeoning demand. Dis- 
tribution and sales for the entire line 
have risen dramatically. The maca- 
roni maker's products are now car- 
ried by every major chain in the New 
York metropolitan area. The tv cam- 
paign also opened up all the major 
chains in San Francisco and Wash- 
ington. D. C. and increased Chicago 
major chain distribution from one to 
four. Additionally, in early May of 
this year, Buitoni launched Space 
Men, a companion macaroni-shape, 
aiming to take advantage of and ex- 
pand the market already created by 
Wagon Wheels. Initial consumer re- 
sponse, according to company strate- 
gists, has been spectacular. 

The new marketing concept was 
worked out 1>\ Giovanni Buitoni, the 
dynamic food corporation president, 
with Edward de Lancellotti, company 
\.p. in charge of advertising and pub- 
lic relations. This team disregarded 
tradition 1>\ Vmericanizing an Italian 
specialty item. Buitoni contended 



that the unconventional course of the 
promotion "just made good sense." 

"Wagon Wheels was originalb 
called Route I wheel in Italian) ;" ex 
plains de Lancellotti, "but the namt 
was changed soon after Buitoni set uj 
operations in this country in 1940.; 
Capitalizing on the potential of the 
new 'Americanized' name reached 
fruition in last August's campaign. 1 

The campaign for the revamped! 
macaroni began in New York with ai 
full page newspaper announcement 
and a series of 15 spots per week on 
various local kid shows. Within 
month, due to the success in N 
York, the campaign had spread to 20 
leading national markets. 

All the Wagon Wheel (and now 
Space Men too) commercials are de 
livered live by the kid show person 
alities. In order not to disrupt the 
informal feeling of the show with an 
intractable script, de Lancellotti chose 
rather to supply the tot m.c.'s with 
fact sheets, and sample copy, encour- 
aging them to inject their own ideas 
and tailor the commercials to suit. 

To make the biggest impact in 
major markets. Buitoni is on fr 
New York stations, four in Los 
Angeles, and three each in San Fran 
cisco and Chicago. Frequency is rel- 
ativeh light, with 15 spots weekly in 
New York divided equallv among 
the five stations. But as de Lancellotti 
points out, "Kids have favorite shows 
they're sure to see. However, the kid 
who sees Captain Jet may not be a 
Sandy Becker fan, etc. By participat- 
ing in five shows we extend our reach 
beyond what the same 15 spots would 
deliver on 3 shows." 

Here's the Buitoni station line-up, 
placed by its agency. Alrjert Frank- 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



Gunther Law, for Wagon Wheels and 
Space Men: 

In New York, they're on WNBC- 
TV, WCBS-TV. WPIX (TV), WABC- 
TV and WNEW-TY; in Philadelphia, 
WFIL-TV, WRCV-TV; Scranton- 
Wilkes-Barre. WNEP-TVj Washing- 
ton, D.C.. WMAL-TV, WTTG (TV); 
Chicago. WGX - TY. WBBM - TV, 

roniWNBQ (TV); Portland. Me.. WGAN- 
TV; Boston, WHDH-TV, WBZ-TV; 
New Haven. WNHC-TV; Albanv- 
Schenectadv. W-TEN (TV), WRGB 

Li (TV) ; Cleveland. WEWS (TV) ; 

V Tucson. KOLD-TV: Phoenix. KPHO- 

TV; Los Angeles. KTLA (TV), 



KNXT (TV). KHJ-TV, KTTV (TV); 
San Francisco, KRON-TV, KTVU 
(TV), KGO-TV; Miami, WTVJ 
CH I; Jacksonville, WFGA-TV; Tam- 
pa. WTVT (TV). Providence. 
\\ PRO-TV: Orlando. WLOF-TV; and 
Sacramento, KCRA-TV. 

Currently Buitoni is taking a two- 
month hiatus ( July-August) in all 
except the New York. Chicago, Wash- 
ington, D. C, and San Francisco 
markets, the markets where it has 
made its most impressive gains. 

The budget is about BO% tv, 15% 
radio and 5' '<; print. Print is used 
onl\ to make introductory announce- 



ments and when there is no local tv 
station in the market. Buitoni is a 
52-week advertiser on the Carlton 
Frederick radio show in leading mar- 
kets. The nutritionist reinforces the 
Buitoni health image to mothers. 

A back-of-the-package offer of 
Western cut-outs has thus far drawn 
200,000 replies, and they're still com- 
ing in at the rate of 2,000 per week. 
Future plans include the inserting of 
a plastic model Indian or Cowboy 
in each box of Wagon Wheels. Sell- 
ing to kids has paid off for Buitoni, 
and tv has made it all possible. ^ 



KID SHOW M.C.'S HELPED MAKE NEW YORK DRIVE SUCCESS 

ALL WAGON WHEEL and Space Men video commercials are delivered live by local 
kid shou personalities. M.c.'s get free copy reign, are encouraged to inject their own ideas 
in sell. Buitoni is also on "Hi Mom" on WNBC-TV, a program that has appeal to both 
youngsters and their mothers and thereby performs a double duty for food advertiser 




Chubby Jackson, WABC-TV 
Captain Jet, WCBS-TV 



Sandy Becker, WNEW-TV 
Cap'n Allan Swift, WPIX (TV) 








^^^■BUlTOIIi 






Credit: TelePrompter Corp. 
KNOCK-OUT for championship in fifth round. Bristol-Myers-Fiat bagged estimated 30£ cpm 



^ Patterson-Johansson fight on ABC radio pulled 
an astronomical 60 million listeners for the special 

^ Kut most admen ihink such specials are bonus gravy 
for the solid meat and potatoes delivery of the medium 



IS THERE 



Last week, in the aftermath of the 
record-setting 60 million audience 
for ABC radio's Patterson- Johansson 
fight, buyers and sellers of radio were 
masticating this question: Can spe- 
cials develop into a big thing on 
network radio and add new zing to 
the medium? 

Industry sources suggested the pos- 
sibility that special events such as 
this world championship fight might 
revise the entire radio programing 
concept and, especially, the prospects 
for nighttime. 

But some admen, most of whom 
tuned in during that eventful 20 June 
evening, point out that: 

• The fight was blacked out on 
tv. thereby making it a natural for 
radio. 

• That only once in a decade 
does a sensational program of this 
kind come along for radio, under 
these circumstances. 

• And, anyway, radio's strength is 
in a continuing rather than a one-shot 
effort. 

ABC, which sold the radio rights 
for an estimated $200,000 to Fiat 
Motor Co. and to Bristol-Myers, 
thinks it is developing a program 
pattern which will attract nighttime 
as well as daytime advertisers. Rob- 
ert Pauley, v.p. in charge of the radio 
network, is the first to admit, how- 
ever, that there are few events which 
can snare public interest as the cham- 
pionship did. He, with the admen 
queried by SPONSOR, is puzzled as to 
what the network can now do for an 
encore. 

Some admen say radio doesn't need 
an encore — that the specials are a fine 
bonus for an advertiser but that spon- 
sors get their worth from the medium 
on a day-to-day basis. Others think 
there is some kind of programing an- 
swer but, again, they're not quite sure 
what it is. 

John Keavey, v.p. of EWRR, is 
one of those who "couldn't care less" 
about this astronomical audience fig- 
ure. Why? "Because the efficiency of 
using radio as a medium has long 
been proved. Only the method needs 
re-evaluation. The medium is strong 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



FUTURE IN RADIO SPECIALS? 



:>n a continuing basis, and this kind 
of an audience is gravy. But radio 
has a steady audience every day, not 
just for specials." 

Another agency executive who 
agrees with him is Warren Bahr, 
Y&R v.p., who thinks "this kind of 
buy is opportunistic rather than pat- 
terned. I don't see any future for this 
kind of programing because — to be 
successful — it would have to be 
blacked out on tv." 

Bahr, commenting further on night- 
time, says, "It just doesn't interest 
most advertisers. Daytime, however, 
does, but I think it can be programed 
and sold better." He suggests two 
devices : Selling radio along the older 
scheduling concept of fewer announce- 
ments per week but with more con- 
secutive weeks, and programing com- 
mercials within editorial content so 
there's sufficient commercial separa- 
tion. 

However, the fight and its enor- 
mous radio audience has focused new 
attention on the medium, in the opin- 
ion of Harold Fair, v.p. of Bozell & 
Jacobs agency. He decries the stero- 
typed programing into which both tv 
and radio have fallen, and sees no 
reason why "radio must be confined 
to such narrow bands as news, phono- 
graph records and sports." 

This return match between the 
champions, he says, documents the 
reach of radio — and the importance 
of promotion. "The first match didn't 
begin to get this kind of an audi- 
ence," but the re-match was heavily 
promoted. 

ABC's Bob Pauley, knowing it will 
be difficult to equal this total audi- 
ence, nevertheless thinks he has be- 
gun to develop a programing formula 
which will pay off for advertisers, 
the station affiliates and the network 
in its daytime programing. 

A new 55-minute program called 
Flair (1-1:55 p.m.) will be aired 
Mondays through Fridays starting 3 
October, built around 11 five-minute 
segments, each of which features a 
personality "talk" feature lasting no 
longer than a minute and a half. Two 
of these are sold by the station, the 
remainder, by the network. These 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



segments can also be taken by the sta- 
tions individually for use in local pro- 
graming from 1 to 5 p.m. The audi- 
ence is there, says Bill Rafael, ABC 
national director of programs, which 
is why he's planning more specials 
and more sports features. 

Still another adman, however, dis- 
agrees that programing has a future 
in networking. This is Emil Mogul, 
president of Mogul, Williams & Say- 
lor agency, New York, who considers 
the fight a "public service" event and 
—as such — one of the three types of 
programing which he envisions for 
radio. 

"Nighttime network radio should 
be abandoned as we know it today, 
with a skeleton operation maintain- 
ing public service programing, civil 
defense and possibly an accelerated 
national news schedule." He contend- 
ed this last year, charging the cost of 
network radio is contributing to "the 
inflated cost of network tv. Night- 
time net radio is dead, but refuses to 
be buried," he said, suggesting that 
monies saved be put to creative tv 
uses. 

The championship fight, he con- 
cluded, served as material for a "pub- 
lic service program." But he "can 
understand why network people in- 
terpret the 60 million audience as a 
sign that network radio is ready for 
a big comeback. But to be realistic, 
the audience would have been rela- 
tively small had the fight been car- 
ried by net tv." 

John Keavey of EWRR reiterates 
that radio's vast audience was mere- 
ly proven again by the size of the 
fight audience. The half-hour broad- 
cast (following a five-round fight to 
a knockout) pulled one of the biggest 
audiences on record. 

Les Blumenthal of Doyle Dane 
Bernbach says only four "fireside 
chats" of President Franklin Roose- 
velt out-pulled the fight. These were 
the declaration of a national emer- 
gency in 1941. with 53.8 million; a 
war message to the people later that 
year, 62.1 million; the "high pur- 
pose" speech in 1942, 61.1 million, 
and the "stab in the back" report in 
1940, 42.5 million. 



In recent years, A. C. Nielsen re- 
ported a radio audience of 16.5 mil- 
lion for the Masland special in 1958 
and two million homes for the big- 
gest game in the 1959 world series of 
baseball. 

Pauley's goal for ABC: a well-bal- 
anced program effort which will give 
national advertisers a continuing, day- 
to-day network audience as well as 
one-shots which will pull in the king- 
size audiences. ^ 



CO-SPONSOR (with Bristol-Myers) of ABC 

event: Marco Pittaluga, (I), gen. mgr., Fiat 

Motor Car. He's with Robert R. Pauley, 

, ABC v.p. in charge of the radio network 




OUTSPOKEN Emil Mogul, pres., Mogul, 
Williams, Saylor agency, N.Y., says event was 
'extraordinary' one-shot but not a trend 




STANDARDIZED BILLING FORM CLICKS 



# Over 100 stations have already adopted manual 
form proposed by SPONSOR Spot Practices Committee 

^ For stations still studying form, here are the 
answers to 10 of the most commonly asked questions 



r\ flood of favorable reactions to 
the standardized radio/tv spot billing 
form, proposed by the SPONSOR Spot 
Practices Committee (see sponsor, 
21 May and 20 June) has been pour- 
ing into sponsor offices recently. 
At presstime this week more than 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON STANDARD BILLING FORM 



Q. Hon about machine billing? 

J± m Ralph Neuman of Benton & Bowles, a member of the 
SPONSOR Spot Practices Committee, expects to have 
recommendations for forms suitable for machine billing on IBM, 
NCR, Remington Rand, and other equipment within a few weeks. 
The manual form recommended by the committee is only for 
stations using such billing. If you now have machine billing do 
not change your procedures until new forms are ready. 



Q. Is this form suitable as an affidavit? 

JP^ m The Agency Financial Management Group, in approving 
the SPONSOR form, endorsed the signature at the bot- 
tom as the only proof of performance required by these 65 
leading agencies. Though some stations provide more elaborate 
affidavits, the Committee feels that these are unnecessary today. 



Q. How about monthly balances? 

/^_ The Committee and the agencies who have endorsed 
the standard billing form ask specifically that monthly 
balances be carried on a separate statement. The billing form 
is not, and is not intended to be, a statement. 



Q. How about naming station repre- 
sentatives on the form? 

f^ m The Committee feels that the name of the station's rep- 
resentative can properly be included on the form if 
the station so desires. However, it cautions against adding too 
many other items to the form— purely in the interest of 
simplicity. 



Q. Should talent and production 
charge be included? 

f^ m The agencies who have endorsed the form, request 
that stations list on a separate sheet any production 
or talent charges that are involved. The standard billing form 
is to be used for time charges only. 



Q. How are short rates and adjust- 
ments handled? 

/^ B These should be explained at the bottom of the form 
in the blank lines provided. 

Q. How about saturation schedules? 

/^ m Several stations have questioned the size of the form. 
They point out that with heavy saturation schedules, 
it is impossible to list all entries on a single sheet. The Com- 
mittee and endorsing agencies suggest, however, that second or 
third sheets be used, if necessary, rather than larger forms. 
Most agencies find it easier to file forms of this size. 

Q- How about our "similar" form? 

/^ B One or two stations, in replying, have pointed out that 
the forms they are now using are "similar" to the rec- 
ommended form. The Committee in examining these forms, how- 
ever, found significant differences which do not provide the 
standardization sought. Says the Committee, "Remember— the 
form of the form is as important as the information it carries." 

Q. Can the "cents" column be 
expanded? 

/\_ One station feels that a little more space is needed 
for the "cents" column at the right of the form. The 
Committee agrees that this may be expanded slightly without 
hurting standardization. Also, some stations report that a 
regular 8V2" x 11" sheet won't fit into their typewriters. The 
form may be reduced slightly to fit such machines. 



Q- 

A. 



Are printed forms available? 



The Committee has made no arrangements to get into 
the business of printing standard billing forms. How- 
ever, since the forms were announced, several sources have 
offered such a service to the industry. Among them: Francis M. 
Kadow, gen. mgr. WOMT, Manitowoc, Wise.; and Freebern Press, 
79 Maple Street, Hudson Falls, N. Y. Write for prices. 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



100 radio and tv stations had indi- 
cated that they will adopt the new 
form, endorsed by 65 leading agen- 
cies, the SRA, the ANA, and other 
industry groups. 

A number of other stations have 
written that they will use the form, 
subject to clearing up certain ques- 
tions which have puzzled their billing 
and accounting departments. The 
Spot Practices Committee is process- 
ing these questions as speedily as 
possible. For the benefit of other 
broadcasters who may have similar 
queries, we print opposite some com- 
mon questions with their answers. 

Among stations which are adopt- 
ing the form, in addition to the 30 
I mentioned in SPONSOR. 20 June, are: 

WAZY, Lafayette, Ind.; KXO, El 
Centro, Calif. ; WGAC, Augusta, Ga. ; 



WIRC, Hickory, N. C; WDEV, Wa- 
terbury, Vt.; WJPA, Washington, 
Pa.; WAAB, Worcester, Mass.; 
WESC AM & FM, Greenville, S. C; 
WBRB, Mt. Clemens, Mich.; KBUN, 
Bemidji, Minn.; WTKO, Ithaca, 
N. Y.; KMNS, Sioux City, la.; KRIO, 
McAllen, Tex.; KCOL, Ft. Collins, 
Colo.; WWCA, Gary, Ind.; WJAB, 
Portland, Me.; WAME, Miami, 
Fla.; KFMK, Houston, Tex.; KEYS, 
Corpus Christi, Tex.; KOAM, Pitts- 
burg, Kan.; WAMY, Amory, Miss.; 
WCBI, Columbus, Miss.; WROX, 
Clarksdale, Miss. ; WMOX, Meridian, 
Miss.; WNGA, Grenada, Miss.; 
WELO, Tupelo, Miss.; WROB, 
West Point, Miss.; WONA, Winona, 
Miss.; WPON, Pontiac, Mich.; 
WRMN, Elgin. 111.; WBTM, Danville, 
Va.; WGAD, Gadsden. Ala.; WBBQ, 



Augusta, Ga.; WOMI, Owensboro, 
Ky.; KVOO, Tulsa, Okla.; KBOR, 
Brownsville, Tex.; WTVL, Water- 
ville, Me.; KSOO AM & TV, Sioux 
Falls, S. D.; KGU, Honolulu, Ha- 
waii; WJNC, Jacksonville, N. C; 
WBKH, Hattiesburg, Miss.; WSM, 
Nashville, Tenn.; KRCG-TV, Jeffer- 
son City, Mo.; KVOR, Colorado 
Springs, Colo.; WKAB, Mobile, Ala, 
KGMS, Sacramento, Calif.; KPRG\ 
Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif. 
KREO, Indio-Palm Springs, Calif. 
KROP, Brayley-El Centro, Calif. 
KYOR, Blythe, Calif.; KFBI, Wich- 
ita, Kan.; WPTF, Raleigh, N. C. 
WXEX-TV, Richmond, Va.; KBI 
Seattle, Wash.; WBAG AM & FM. 
Burlington, N. C; WLUC-TV, Mar- 
quette, Mich.; WSUN AM & TV, St. 
Petersburg, Fla. 



Rep gives its gals the salesman's grand tour 



Ladies' day has finally arrived at 
Harrington, Righter and Parsons. 

While many a distaff member of 
the New York representative firm 
spends a seven-hour day working on 
commercial television schedules, sell- 
ing on the telephone, taking care of 
makegoods, pre-emptions, contract de- 
tails and other matters, the inside of 
« television studio, up until recently 
was as far and foreign to her as the 
other side of the world. 

It wasn't logical, the HRP boys 
reasoned. Anyone so close to the 
heart of the matter deserved the 
•chance to scope all of it. Besides, the 
gals would probably do a better job 
if they visited one of the rep's sta- 
tions and saw first-hand what hap- 
pened to a commercial order they had 
placed. 

Their reasoning resolved itself into 
a plan — which they labeled "One for 
the Road" — whereby 10 of the New 
York office gals would visit WTIC- 
TV, Hartford, for a whirlwind tour 
of its studios. 

First order of the day: an inside 
view of the Ranger Andy Show — a 
live kids program — replete with a 
play-by-play description of how the 
show was prepared for telecasting, 



the duties of the director, switcher, 
audio man, cameramen, boomman, 
floor man, and others associated with 
airing the show. 

Later the girls were treated to a 
grand tour of the master control 
room, projection room, video tape 
room, and photographic library, 
where they learned about tv equip- 
ment and its uses, film editing and 
processing. 

As the day progressed, so did the 
activity. From the news room, where 
the visitors were shown the AP and 
UPI teletypes, AP Photofax machine 
and were told about the many prob- 
lems encountered in gathering, prepar- 
ing copy, film, and still photographs 
for presentation, they moved to the 
Travelers Weather Service, which pro- 
vides live weather roundups, for a 
capsule lecture on weather forecasting 
from the meteorological assistant. 

Final windup of the trip was a ses- 
sion with station v.p. in charge of 
sales Irwin Cowper. who explained 
the sales setup, then a look at the sta- 
tion's billing operation, and a quick 
examination of the course commer- 
cials orders take from reception to 
airtime. 

The end of the day found 10 tired, 



but enlightened HRP gals home 
again, all of them firmly convinced 
their on-the-job performance would 
be considerably better for their tour 
of the television station. ^ 




STUDIO-HAPPY Harrington, Righter and 
Parsons gals (l-r) Terry Carlucci, Natalie Ei- 
mer. Pearl Moslcowiti, watch WITC-TV's Har- 
old Dorschug work video tape control panel 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



With the demands of clients increasing, SPONSOR ASKS: 

What has been your most 

difficult sales pt 




Mel Bartell, president a general man- 
Barteli Broad- 
casting < orp.. Veu ) ork 

One advertise] stands out in mj 
mind because he did evei ything right 
from oiii poinl oi \ i<-\\ . First, he came 
to u- foi help. I hen, there was no 
quibbling on budget Finally, he al- 
lowed ti- t>> plan and carr\ through 
the whole promotion without inter- 
fcn-iK e. So, we just had to make good 

Id 195 1 the Milwaukee brokei foi 



I Milwaukee 
broker ior 
Chicken of the 
Sea whose sales 
u ere don n 



Chicken of the Sea Tuna faced a se- 
vere sales problem in that market. 
He had pood distribution, but his 
Bales were down. TV's Arthur God- 
fre\ was at his peak and he was sell- 
ing the competition's product. We 
put together what we considered the 
"whole hall of wax." — heavy on the 
air exposure <>n our Milwaukee sta- 
tion, \\ OKY, plus a coordinated mer- 
chandising effort that included taping 
supermarket managers at their stores 
In do the selling over the air. plus 
window banners, store displays and 
other merchandising and sales pro- 
motion activity. One year later, a 
consumer preference report showed 
that the Bartell "Complete Concept of 
Selling plan had given our advertis- 
i-i a loo' , i iae in Bales. 

We believe that the basis for ad- 
vertising as with all human relation- 
ship is "respect." Respect for each 
advertise! and his individual prob- 
lem-. The goal is the same for all — 
sales. However, each problem is 
unique and must be solved in a dif- 
ferent manner in order to arrive at 
the Bame end result. It is this 
that we have for our advertisers, no 
matt. -i ho* large 01 -mall, ih.it keeps 
the door to m\ office always open. 



Again the word "respect'" applies 
to the listening audience as well. 
\\ \D<) is programing for the three 
major ethnic cultures in New York. 
Spanish, Italian, and Negro. WADO 
i- catering to these ethnic cultures by 
programing with dignity and mean- 
in-, serving the actual needs of these 
ethnic communities. 

Goal of the Bartell New York flag- 
ship, W ADO. is to attract a mass audi- 
ence via intelligent, creative program- 
ing, backed by carefully planned, co- 
ordinated, and executed merchandis- 
ing. This insures each and every 
\\ \I)() and Bartell advertiser of a 
pre-tested format of programing and 
merchandising which has successfully 
created consumer demand in all areas 
of Bartell operations. 

James H. Ferguson, Jr., vice pres. 
tor sales WW LP, Springfield Television 
Corp., Springfield, Mass. 
Like many other stations around 
the country the toughest sales nut for 
our staff here at WWLP. Springfield. 
Ma>s.. was not a product whose ad 
director was against tv for one rea- 
son or another, but a department 
store whose philosophy of advertising 
was built around the print media and 
direct mail and whose "show me" atti- 
tude was one of the toughest and 




hardest to cope with this side of 
Missouri. 

In our case we tried for five years 
making pitch after pitch after pitch, 
with each pitch being a different an- 
•Ar on lion tv could do a fine compe- 
titive job. The answer was always 
the same. "No." 

Finally our local salesmanager and 
the sales account executive put to- 



gether, after some three months of 
work, a completely revised and orig- 
inal sales presentation urging at least 
an experimental campaign on WWLP. 

The advertiser finally gave us the 
go-ahead with a five-minute segment 
once a day in 1958. This was after 
working on this one account since 
March 17. 1953, the day WWLP went 
on the air. 

Following the first six months of 
the "experiment" there was no further 
activity or interest on the part of the 
department store and it looked as 
though it would be back to the draw- 
ing board. However, the factors that 
had made our presentation finally ac- 
ceptable — the consumer reaction to 
tv with eventual successful results — 
became more and more apparent and 
the account man for the department 
store found the advertiser more and 
more amenable to suggestions for ad- 
ditional television buys. In the fall 
of 1959 the store completely revised 
its advertising budget and expanded 
its tv plans more than we had ever 
hoped. Today, it is one of our larg- 
est over-all advertisers. 

I think our sales staff and the per- 
sonnel working at WWLP benefitted 
more from this tough sale than any- 
thing that has come since. We learned 
the hard way that you have to offer 
more than vague promises and blue 
sky bonanzas in order to convince an 
advertiser, not that what he has been 
doing for years is wrong, but that 
what he can do with additional media 
will increase his business. 

Wm. A. Garden, national sales direc- 
tor. WNDU-TV, South Bend. Indiana 

One of the most difficult sales I 
have made was the alternate week 
sponsorship of the Bishop Sheen Pro- 
gram to the Garnitz Furniture Com- 
panv of South Bend. Indiana. 

Mr. Garnitz. a member of the Jew- 
ish faith, was naturallv somewhat ap- 
prehensive of what viewer reaction 
might be to his sponsorship of a 
Catholic bishop who uses Christian 
doctrine as a basis for his talks. 



48 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




problem? 



Garnitz has sponsored other pro- 
grams on television, so it was not 
a matter of convincing him of the 
power of television as an advertising 
medium, nor of the proven audience 
pulling power of Bishop Sheen. 

Mr. Garnitz was quick to sense the 
value of the Bishop Sheen Program as 
an audience attraction, but had to be 
convinced the program would improve 
his corporate image. He in no way 
wished to jeopardize his store. 



Convincing a 
client that 
Bishop Sheen s 
H appeal extended 
to all faiths 



In a series of meetings and conver- 
sations in which I enlisted the aid of 
our general manager. Tom Hamilton, 
we pointed out that, this was in fact, 
not a religious program. The Bish- 
op's dissertations concerned them- 
selves basically with the problems of 
modern living, and his sparkling 
sense of humor, so adroitly interwov- 
en with serious matter, would offend 
no one, regardless of faith. 

After careful consideration and 
checking with people of different 
faiths, whose opinions he respected, 
Mr. Garnitz signed the contract. 

In his first commercial minute on 
his initial show Dick Garnitz said: 

"Good evening. I'm Dick Garnitz 
speaking for Garnitz Furniture. For 
almost 40 years Garnitz Furniture 
Company has been the leader in bring- 
ing you the first in fashion, quality, 
and economy for the home. Too, Gar- 
nitz Furniture Companv has helped 
to foster understanding and morality 
regardless of race, color or creed. Re- 
gardless of faith, we believe vou can 
enjoy and learn from this distin- 
guished man of God." 

Many letters, post cards and phone 
calls, indicated that Mr. Garnitz had 
made a wise decision. ^ 



MELIGHT 





LIMELIGHT ... the Fine Music design for 

discriminating KSDO listeners . . . 

Attracts and holds early morning and late 

afternoon audiences who appreciate the finest and show their 

appreciation with sponsor results . . . 

KSDO, best Fine Music buy in the booming-buying Southwest 

. . . where advertising is limited timewise, 

screened tastewise . . . 



■JL-, 



est Fine Radio Buy In The 



ionally by Daren F. McGavre 



KSDO 



San Diego 



The Gordon Broadcasting Company 

KSDO San Diego AM KBUZ Phoenix AM and FM 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




ER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

33 Years of Community Service 



WHEN DO YOU GUI! A FORMAT! 

The answer is very simple — never! 

At least, in 33 years, we have never quite been able to manage it. 

Public preference changes too fast and so do each community's needs. That is 
why every Storer station is locally oriented to the particular community it serves. 

Only by knowing community problems from day to day have we been 

able to help solve them. Only through constant check on listener and viewer 

preferences have we been able to built loyal, responsive audiences. 

Keeping the public informed and entertained, and working for a better 
community is a day-to-day, often an hour-to-hour, even minute-to-minute job. 

We've never found a way to format community service. It's too big... too 
fluid... too much of a responsibility to be frozen — even for one day. 



Radio 

CLEVELAND-WJW 

TOLEDO-WSPD 

WHEELING-WWVA 

MIAMI-WGBS 

LOSANGELES-KGBS 

DETROIT-WJBK 

PHILADELPHIA-WIBG 



Television 

DETROIT-WJBK TV 

CLEVELAND-WJW-TV 

MILWAUKEE-WITI-TV 

ATLANTA-WAGA-TV 

TOLEDO-WSPD-TV 



NATIONAL SALES OFFICES:: 625 Madison Ave.. NY. 22. PLaza 1-3940 / 230 N. Michigan Ave.. Chicago 1. FRanfclin 2-6498 



InTVtoo... 
FILM does the'impossible"! 




'I'VE GOT NEWS FOR YOU" . . . 

"Sure, I'm Ford's shaggy dog . . . rated one of 
the brightest, even if I do say so myself. But, 
frankly, I'd get nowhere, if I weren't on film. And 
that, I'm told, goes for thousands of other TV 
commercials— animated and otherwise."' 



Again, fhe dog is right. Film, and film alone, 
does three things for you: (1 ) gives animation- 
crisp, exciting; (2) provides the optical effects 
you've always required for high-polish com- 
mercials; (3) assures you the coverage and 
penetration market -( 



For more information, write Motion Picture Film Department 
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Rochester 4, N.Y. 



East Coast Division 
342 Modison Avenue 
New York 17, NY. 



Midwest Division 

1 30 East Randolph Dri 

Ch.cogo 1, III. 



West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 

Hollywood 38, Calif. 



or W. J. German, Inc. Agents for the sale 
and distribution of Eastman Professional Motion Picture 
Films, Fort Lee, N.J., Chicago, III., Hollywood, Calif. 



ADVERTISER: Ford Motor Car Company 
AGENCY: J. Walter Thompson Company 
PRODUCER: Playhouse Pictures— Hollywood 




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National and regional buys 
ork now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Lever Bros. Co., New York: Campaign for All begins this month 
in both major and minor markets. Day and night minutes run for 
nine weeks, five-seven per week per market. Buyer: Don DeCarlo. 
Agency: Needham, Louis & Brorby, Inc., Chicago. 
Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York: Poise, a new deodorant, is 
being tested in five markets starting this month. Schedules are for 
eight weeks, night minutes. Buyer: Shel Boden. Agency: Norman, 
Craig & Kummel, New York. 

Pillsbury Co., Minneapolis: Activity continues on its cake mixes, 
with markets being added this month to the 10 that started in June. 
Present placements are for 39 weeks using heavy frequencies of day 
minutes and chainbreaks. Agency: Leo Burnett Co., Chicago. 
Mennen Co., Morristown, N. J.: In addition to the campaign set 
for the men's line reported here last week, a new deodorant for both 
men and women, Orbit, is getting test schedules in several markets 
around the country. Introductory runs are for eight weeks, day and 
night minutes being used. Buyer: Joe Hudack. Agency: Warwick 
& Legler, New York. 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co., Louisville: Ziv-UA's Case of 
the Dangerous Robin adventure series has been placed in about 30 
top markets for a fall start, five to 10 more probably to be added. 
Brand allocation (Kool, Viceroy, Life and Belair ) has not been made 
yet. Buyer: Bill Warner. Agency: Ted Bates & Co., New York. 
Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati: New schedules for Mr. Clean 
begin this month in a number of markets. Day and fringe night 
minutes have been bought. Agency: Leo Burnett Co., Chicago. 
American Tobacco Co., New York: New campaign for Roi-Tan 
cigars starts late July in the top markets. Fringe night minutes are 
being scheduled for 52 weeks, frequencies varying. Buyer: Sandy 
Gasman. Agency: Lawrence C. Gumbinner Adv. Agency, New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

G. H. P. Cigar Co., Inc., Sub. of Consolidated Cigar Corp.. New 
York: Going into about 15 top markets this month for El Producto 
cigars. Traffic and day minutes will run for eight weeks. Buyer: 
Delores Corbone. Agency : Compton Adv., New York. 
Continental Baking Co., Inc., Rye. N. Y.: Ising short-term sched- 
ules this month in various markets for its Wonder buns and rolls. 
Day and traffic minute placements are set. Buyer: Perry Seastrom. 
Agency : Ted Bates & Co.. New York. 

Potter Drug & Chemical Corp., Medford, Mass.: Planning a fall 
campaign in 35 top markets to introduce a new medication for acne, 
Cutatone. Schedules will be placed in the top afternoon d.j. shows, 
20-24 per week per market, to reach a teen-age audience. Buyer: 
Roxanne Gordon. Agency: Kastor. Hilton. Chesley. Clifford & \ther- 
ton, New York. 



".4 tremendous ■ 

compilation and editing. 

I can't think of another 

source of SO mueh 

useful information 

under the sen- 

—POWELL H. ENSIGN 

Eiecut.ve Mn President 
Everett McKmney. Nn York 



''Expect to use it as a 
'basic' reference book." 



-WARREN C. FITZSIMMONS 

Media Research 
McCann-Erickson. New York 



"... packed with a 

remarkable supply of 

vital information." 



-RICHARD C. PROCTOR 

Richard Proctor Advertising 
Montgomery, Alabama 



". . . invaluable as c. f 
up-to-the-minute f 
analysis of the , f 
broadcasting field. 
—CARL R. JOHNSON 

Music Studios. Los An; 



"/ find Air Media Basics 

a very usable reference 

on market and market 

selei tion and also in 

presenting the basics on 

these media to 

my clients." 

—DAVID B. AULT 

Account Eiecutive 

Grant Advertising, Dallas 



". . . definite value, not 

only for reference 

purposes, but they make 

a very fine performance 

chart for new Buyers or 

Buyers who are really 

broadcasting and 

formerly handled Print." 

—J. C. LYONS 

Weed Radio Corp., New York 



. . . extremely valuable 

to a time-buying 

creative director." 

—BILL WOLFF 

Radio/Tv Director 
Advertising Agencies, Inc. 
Studio City, California 



"SPOXSOR's Air Media 

Basics is valuable to the 
timebuyer. It's packed 
with facts and figures 
on all phases of broad- 
cast mpdia and is an 
aid for quick reference 
to key sectors in 
marketing." 

—JOHN A. BLOMSTROM 

Media Director 



You'll Reach These Important Advertiser 

And Agency Executives ... and Thousands 

More with Your Ad In 

SPONSOR'S 

AIR MEDIA 

BASICS! 



FINAL DEADLINE 11 W»-V 



\andr 

bene . 
| won 

ng: 

%at is *" 



Wnd 
\ alX 



"We find your publica- 
tion invaluable . . . most 
useful to the entire staff 

. . . informative . . . 

most practical ..." 
—ROY G. DUNLOP 

Controller of Programs 



"tremendous . . . by far 

the best to date. It's 

loaded with valuable 

day-to-day information 

and will be a reference 

'must' in our shop 

during the coming year." 

—FRED L. BERNSTEIN 
Vice President 
FORJOE. New York 



". • • by far the best 

working handbook that 

has been published to 

date. You are to be 

commended for putting 

so much valuable 

information in the hands 

of your subscribers." 

—LAWRENCE WEBB 
Managing Director 
SRA, New York 



"I wonder if it would 
be possible for us to 
obtain two additional 
copies of AIR MEDIA 
BASICS? Everybody in 
this office keeps borrow- 
ing mine and I hate to 
let it out of my office 
for fear of not 
getting it back." 

—KAY SHELTON 

Time Buyer 

Compton, San Francisco 



"As you predicted, it 
now occupies the centei 
spot on my desk. It is o 
SRDS, McKit trick, ant \ 
Broadcasting yearbook 
all rolled into one." 

—JAY MULLEN 

Station Manager 

WLSV, Welsville. New York, ft 



"Enjoyed your 13th 

annual AIR MEDIA 

BASICS. Expect to 

use it as a 'basic' 

reference book." 

—WARREN C. FITZSIMMON! 

Media Research 
McCann-Erickson, New York 



Our . . . reaction has 

>en 'How did we get 

along without it 

up to now!' " 

—BARBARA FREEMAN 

Timtbuyer 

drson/Roberts, Los Angeles 



.my day-to-day right 
and guide. I keep it 

handy for use in 
'esentations . . .as a 
leral guide and media 
ncyclopedia deluxe." 

—ESTHER N. ANDERSON 

Timebuyer 

MacFarland, Aweyard & Co. 



"A needed tool with all 
the broadcast inform- 
ation compactly compiled 
in one publication." 

—JAMES F. KELLY 



SPONSOR has done 
tself proud. This is the 

most complete com- 
pendium of Radio-Tv 
marketing information 
I have ever seen." 

—ROBERT H. TETER 

Vice President— Radio 
PGW, New York 



7 would most definitely 

recommend AIR 
MEDIA BASICS to all 

media buyers and 

{account people who are 

directly or indirectly 

connected with 

broadcast media." 

—ROBERT F. BRUNO 



. . a veritable store- 
house of useful 
information." 

— RAOUL KENT 

MCA-TV, Film Syndicate Di». 
Chicago 



". . . very useful and 

easy to use and I assure 

you I shall make 

frequent use of it 

in my daily work." 

—BETTY MORGART 

Sec'y to Advertising Director 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. 



"Your 13th annual Air 

Media Basics has 
arrived and is being put 
to good use immediately. 
The up-to-date informa- 
tion on listening and 
viewing habits is most 
helpful in planning 
our 1960 campaign." 

—LESTER E. JOHNSON 

Applegate Advertising 



"7 like AIR MEDIA 

BASICS time-buying 

information, especially 

the up-to-the-minute 

statistical data on 

tv and radio trends. 

An excellent publication 

for anyone who buys 

AIR MEDIA." 

—ANITA WASSERMAN 

Lawrence C. Gumhinner 
New York 



\ When these busy executives need informa- 
tion to make spot-buying decisions, they turn 
first to SPONSOR'S AIR MEDIA BASICS. 
When it comes to providing the charts and 
tables, the statistics and reference data 
about all phases of the broadcast industry, 
they know that AIR MEDIA BASICS is in a 
class by itself! 

They know that AIR MEDIA BASICS' key 
sections supply the tools timebuyers need to 
make decisions with a minimum of time 
and effort. These key sections are: 
TIMEBUYING BASICS 
RADIO BASICS 
TV BASICS 
FILM & TAPE BASICS 

Important features include a complete 
county- by-county TV set count, a directory 
of AM, FM and TV stations and their 
representatives — by market, and a new 
directory of timebuyers of the U.S. 

It's no wonder AIR MEDIA BASICS wins 
praise from The INFLUENTIAL 2,000— the 
timebuyers and others who do the big 
spot buying. 

That's why your ad belongs in SPONSOR'S 
14th AIR MEDIA BASICS. It assures call 
fetter recognition for your station — recog- 
' *hat important moment of decision! 

\DCAST INDUSTRY'S MOST 
IVE AND PRACTICAL WORKING 
;IES AND ADVERTISERS! 




Sponsor, 40 E. 49th Street, New York 17, N.Y. 

Reserve page(s) in SPONSOR'S 14th Annual 

AIR MEDIA BASICS. My position preference is: 

□ TIMEBUYING BASICS □ RADIO BASICS 

□ TV BASICS D FILM AND TAPE BASICS 



REGULAR RATES APPLY • 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional television campaigi 



TV RESULTS 



FOREIGN CARS 

SPONSOR: i \(,l \< 5 : Direcl 

Capsule case history: "The most successful promotion I 
evei i. in." said Harold Loftus, owner-manager of Loftus 
Motoi ( ... ..I S< ranton, Pa., aftei In- campaign in this area. 
"The Buccesa can onl) be atn il.uted to WDAU-TV." The 
campaign centered on the Goggomobil, introduced earlier 
tlii> year and considered bj most dealers as lacking con- 
Bumer appeal and unsaleable. Loftus decided upon a spot 
campaign on WDM T\ to promote the Goggomobil, and 
purchased a saturation schedule of 10- and 20-second an- 
oouncements to run for seven days. The slide with voice 
ovei Bpots stressed the Iom price (S795) and the excellent 
ileage (60 mpg) of the Goggomobil. Within the first 
few days of the campaign, a total of 42 cars was sold to 
the WDAU-TV viewers. Other sales were made after the 
campaign, as a direct result of the advertising. In addi- 
tion, main foreign car dealers in Pennsylvania contacted 
I. ..ftn- through the spots and he sold them 172 cars. 
WD \l - 1 \ . Scranton-^ ilkes Barre Announcements 

BANKS 

SPONSOR: St. Joseph's Bank X Trust Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The St. Joseph's Bank & Trust Co. 
of South Bend, Indiana, has found what it terms to be a 
"natural" h program for its purposes. It needed a program 
thai would give its employees an opportunity to help pro- 
'""'•• ili«- bank more effectively, and found Manhunt, on 
W MM . was the answer. The show has the highest rating 
l '" its '""" P eriod ; ' 31.8 from 9:30 to 10 p.m. Thursday 
m - llK - ' " (l '■ Helman, president of the bank, said: 
WM)| ' 8 \fanhunt has certainly been a most successful 
vehicle foi the type of advertising we're trying to do. It has 
stimulated tremendous employee effort, and we have re- 
••""I ' great deal of comment about the show and our 
ercials. We feel that we're getting across a good, solid 
image of what our Lank represents." WNDU-TV's general 
manager, Tom Hamilton, point,,! out that many locaUdver- 
dsera •""' tested in the -institutional image" and find 
»wei of ff.beai syndicated (,1m. with high ratings. 

WNDl IN. South Bead 

rrogram 



CEREALS 

^I'ONsOK: Kellogg Co. Agency: Leo Burnett C 

Capsule case history: Bob Simpson, the local Norfol 
sales manager for the Kellogg Co., working with Mik 
Schaffer, merchandising and promotion director of WAVY 
TV, set up a special merchandising campaign to supplemen 
an extensive tv spot schedule on that station. The schedul* 
consisted of sponsorship of three local kid shows: Quid 
Draw McGraw, Mondays, 5-5:30 p.m.; Woody Woodpecker 
Tuesdays, 5-5:30 p.m.; and Huckleberry Hound, Thursdays 
5-5:30 p.m. Result: WAVY's efforts secured a major break 
through for distribution of Kellogg's cereals in the loca 
Belo Chain Stores, one of the largest chains in the area 
"We have had the best sales increase in the Norfolk market 
in many years," Simpson told WAVY. In a letter to Mike 
Schaffer, C. P. Davidson, division sales manager for Kel- 
logg, wrote: "Business in the Norfolk market certainly 
shows the extra sales help we've been getting is definitely 
paying off. We hope to increase our programing on WAVY." 
WAVY-TV, Norfolk Programs 

FOOD PACKERS 

SPONSOR: Ventre Packing Co. AGENCY: Osborn & Probst Adv. 
Capsule case history: The Ventre Packaging Co. of Syra- 
cuse, manufacturers of Enrico's food products, found that 
new products were forcing their way into the Albany-Troy- 
Schenectady market and endangering a tremendous 90% 
distribution figure for its spaghetti sauce. Pressure was 
brought to bear by local distributors on both the manufac- 
turer and its agency, Osborn & Probst of Syracuse. Ventre 
decided to sign a 52-week contract for the syndicated film 
Target, hosted by Adolph Menjou, and placed it on WAST, 
Albany, in the 10:30 p.m. slot. Results for Ventre Packaging 
after more than 40 weeks on the air in this market: a 23.3 
Nielsen with a 44% share of the audience. This was 127c 
higher than the closest competitor. In terms of sales for 
Ventre, the show considerably strengthened its distribution 
pattern, returning the spaghetti sauce to the original 90% 
figure, and sales increased 25% since Target went on the 
air. Ventre plans on using the show for an indefinite period. 
WAST, Albany Programs 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




DEMON 
LEMON 



(Cup runneth over dept.J 

Employees of WMAL-TV and affiliate WSVA-TV are on their annual picnic. 
Three salesmen chance together at a nearly empty, lidless lemonade barrel 
in which twelve cupfulls remain. There are only two containers; one holds 
three cups, the other five. How can an equal apportionment be made? (No 
fair sending them to a tavern for other measures. They may drink from 
either container at any time. Omit considerations of sanitation; only their 
enthusiasm for sponsors and spiked lemonade is contagious.) 

Win big! Each correct solution gets its sender a cup of lemonade next time 
we see him, a copy of Dudeney*s "Amusements in Mathematics," (published by 
Dover Publications, Inc., N. Y. C.) by return mail, and a refreshing look at 
Channel Seven's significant place in our significant market. 



wmal-tv 



Channel 7, Washington, D. C. 

An Evening Star Station, represented by H-R Television, Inc. 

Affiliated with WMAL and WMAL-FM, Washington, D.C.; WSVA-TV and WSVA, Harrisonburg, Va. 

sponsor • 11 july 1960 ; 57 

/ 



ropj 



tfMB-T 



iNN 



>JNNM> 



Produced ^IS-ss^ 

ss^ss; .•«*n«J s ,r«» -*> ts * ^ 
■jz&sr~. 



—^_ _: ...-.: 






KFMB^)TV 
SAN DIEGO 

(Edw.rdYpetry *Yco.. Inc.) £p3t33"' 

A TRANSCONTINENT STATION 
CHANNEL 8 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



*■ WASHINGTON WEEK 



II JULY I960 

CoyrlBht IM 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The unexpected August return of Congress leaves some broadcasting matters up 
in the air: closing days of the regular session settled others. 

The FCC got money from Congress for monitoring broadcasting stations and for probing 
complaints against them. Not the $300,000 it asked, but S150,000. However, it also secured 
solid "legislative history." 

Lawmakers hashed over in debate the uses to which the money is to be put, an important 
point to those who want a stronger regulatory hand over broadcasting. 

Among matters still unsettled : 

• The bill to lift Sec. 315 entirely with respect to candidates for president and vice presi- 
dent, but only for 1960. 

• The push for network regulation, which would have died a natural death, if Congress 
had adjourned on schedule. 

• Power for the FCC to fine stations up to SI. 000 per day and to suspend licenses up to 10 
days for rules violations. 



The FCC was petitioned by Chronicle Publishing Company to turn thumbs 
down on the whole complicated series of station sales and trades between RKO 
General and NBC, plus NBC purchase of KTVU, San Francisco. 

More importantly, the operators of KRON-TV in San Francisco launched a treble dam- 
age antitrust suit against NBC in that city. 

The Justice Department has advised a Philadelphia court that it finds no fault with the 
many transactions. The FCC had no reason to turn them down. However, the antitrust suit 
changes the complexion of things. This takes the matter away from government agency 
jurisdiction as to the specific charges. 

The court was told that NBC habitually violates antitrust laws, and all of its licenses 
should be voided. In the case in question, KRON alleges that NBC used its power as a net- 
work to force the series of sales and trades, and that KRON was, itself, faced with the choice 
of selling or losing its NBC affiliation. 

The FCC mav still approve the various transfers involved, but a court decision adverse 
to NBC could force reappraisal. Such a decision could also be a damaging precedent 
for other multiple owners. 

Broadcasters will now have a chance to testify against FCC power to fine and 
suspend licenses for rules violations: no sooner had the extra session announcement 
been made than hearings were set for August. 

There is a strong possibility that these provisions will be dropped from the bill. 

The final measure would then still contain the reversal of the FCC's strict interpretation of the 
sponsorship identification Sec. 317, and criminal penalties for payola and plugola activities by 
station personnel. 

The Senate accepted House amendments and thereby finally cleared bills to per- 
mit the FCC to license the vhf booster stations which are now operating illegally, 
and to permit federal regulatory commissioners to be fired for misdeeds. 

The latter bill would also permit FCC commissioners to serve beyond the ends of their 
terms, until their successors are qualified, up until the end of the next Congressional session 
after expiration. 



• 11 JULY 1960 



59 



Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



II JULY I960 

Co»yrlgh1 I9R0 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



At midyear it's important to take a breather to ask which way syndication is heac 
ing and what's to be expected in the second half of 1960-61 season. 

Take a look at these happenings of the past six months and you'll have a clear hint oi 
what may lie ahead from now to the end of the year. 

These are the more significant areas and what's new in them: 

• New spenders: Tobacco and automotive money was especially important from Stude^ 
baker in several shows and Consolidated Cigar in Ziv-UA's Home Run Derby. 

• New programing: Comedy and animation are back in strength. Look for comedy twist 
in syndicated shows plus the biggest wave to date of new children's shows using animation, 
(Another possibility: watch for more animated shows for adults.) 

• Exits: Major spenders leaving syndication were Continental Baking from national spot 
Annie Oakley, Amoco from U. S. Border Patrol regional. 

• Offbeat shows: Unusual shows like NTA's Play of the Week, Screen Gems' Medicine 
1960, and CBS Films' Robert Herridge Theatre — all capitalizing on tape production tech- 
niques — formed a major public affairs station programing trend. 

• Reorganizations: The Ziv-UA merger was finalized and ATV became the owner of ITC. 

• Station syndication: WPIX, New York, KTTV, Los Angeles, and WGN-TV, Chicago, 
were among the stations breaking in as important program producers and distributors in their 
own right. 

• National spot: Budweiser virtually became a national spot instead of a regional adver- 
tiser in its mammoth buy of NTA's Third Man. 

• Feature films: More than a thousand post-'48 pictures went on the market but the con- 
vulsion they were supposed to cause never took place. 

• Hollywood majors: Paramount Television Productions, in the wake of Warner Bros., 
20th Century-Fox, Columbia, Disney, MGM, and UA, made its bid for entrance into the circle 
of tv film suppliers. 

• Sports : Programing and sales interest in syndicated sports reached an all-time high with 
Home Run Derby, All Star Golf, and others. 

• Foreign production: ITC's deal with 20th Century-Fox for programs was a conces- 
sion that foreign sources haven't met network film needs. 

Kellogg's will put UPA's new Mr. Magoo series in its national spot markets in 
the fall, replacing Woody Woodpecker. 

Incidentally, new faces at the UPA organization are Henry G. Saperstein and Peter De- 
Met, who both acquired large holdings this week; Saperstein becomes president and DeMet 
becomes chairman of the board. 

Saperstein's Dick Tracy series will be made at UPA, and UPA is also shooting 
Mr. Magoo commercials for GE and others. 

The Saperstein-DeMet investment in UPA was through LaSalle National Bank of Chicago. 

WGN-TV, Chicago, is moving ahead to syndicate the 1960 Notre Dame foot- 
ball games on video tape for day-after telecast. 

Last year the games were seen in 60 cities but this season the line-up is expected to ex- 
ceed 100 stations. 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



¥ 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



WCBS-TV, New York, landed three big ones as summer participators in CBS 
Film's Robert Herridge Theatre: General Foods, P&G, and Colgate-Palmolive. 
The respective brands are Yuban, Duz and Palmolive. 

The station, which used to produce such a show locally for around $1,500 a week, paid 
an estimated $2,800 a week for it in syndication, but its tape production budget is now ten 
times higher: $15,000. 

There's roughly $8,000 weekly profit for the station : Three minute announcements go for 
$10,800. 

The participators are getting two things out of the show: (1) A chance to buy night- 
time minutes on WCBS-TV, and (2) association with a show already known in the area and 
which earned a special critical reputation. 

The Westcoast Publicists Association Local 818 is trying to put pressure on the 
eight network film shows handled by non-union press agents at Y&R. 

Chief weapon: The possibility of an AFL-CIO boycott against Simoniz, Goodyear, P. 
Lorillard, Remington Rand, Johnson & Johnson, Bristol-Myers, and Kaiser. 

The paradox is that westcoast press agents have for a long time been all unionized, while 
eastcoast publicity men of the agencies, networks and syndicators, often working 
on the same shows, have never been union members. 

Six Ziv-UA sales executives were elevated and some table of organization 
changes were made this week. 

Edward J. Broman became Chicago v.p. (For other promotions, see FILM NEWS WRAP- 
UP, p. 66.) 

CBS Films and S. W. Caldwell Ltd. scored one of their biggest selling months 
in Canada this June. 

Four shows were sold to CBC in English, two in French, and six shows were sold for 
selective (syndicated) programing. 

They are: to CBC: Have Gun, Will Travel (Lever & Whitehall) ; Wanted Dead or Alive 
(P&G); I Love Lucy (P&G), and Twilight Zone (unsold); to French network: Air Power 
and Champion; in selective programing: Gunsmoke (Remington Rand and Javex), Honey - 
mooners, Annie Oakley, Mama, Richard Diamond, and Trackdown. 



The major trend in the commercials field during the first six months of 1960 
was a move away from diversification and back toward specialization. 

If 1959 was marked by mergers and a mass migration of major film producers into tape, 
then 1960 so far has seen the reverse: film producers have completed an exodus out of tape 
and merger tendencies are over. 

Two film majors, Elliot, Unger & Elliot, and Filmways, got out of tape — although for 
different reasons in each case. The EUE staff was too film-oriented to operate economically 
in tape, and Filmways didn't get rolling at all in deliveries of tape commercials. 

A third commercials major, MPO, which was at one time a candidate for affiliation with 
Screen Gems, decided this year it didn't need a parent company and that it would raise $1.5 
million via a stock issue. 

Investing in tape equipment and acquiring a share of the tape commercials 
market — two motives which drove film producers to seek mergers and affiliations 
with other companies — no longer apply and the spate of mergers is apparently over. 

Note that the recent Robert Lawrence-RKO affiliation solved the tape problem neatly: 
going tape-equipped stations came into the family, not money with which to pioneer in tape. 

• 11 JULY 1960 61 




A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



McCann-Erickson, Inc., this time bypassed the profit-sharing fund in divvying 
up the profits and instead (1) upped the value of the stock, (2) paid off part of 
it- funded indebtedness and (3) retained the balance in the working treasury. 
publication* iho The increase of about $4 a share puts the stock value at around $30. The indebtedness: 

.i bank loan of §750,000 a year over three years, which has a year to go. 

Tis speculated that the stock buildup may have something to do with a plan to diversify 
in tangible asset areas and put out a stock issue for the public. 

NBC TV has tightened its control over programing to the point where it won't 
buy a series from a producer unless it has authority over everything. 

This includes every phase of the scripting, selection of stars and production. 

Here are the benefits that accrue to a newly named v.p. at Y&R New York: 
He gets (1) a tweed carpet instead of a plain colored rug, (2) Larmon green leath- 
er furniture instead of Larmon green wood furniture, (3) a caraffe and two glasses, (4) 
a month's vacation and (5) lesser scrutiny of his expense account. 

Put down Niles Tram m ell, former NBC chief and now WCKT, Miami, presi- 
dent, as probably the longest seller of air media: he started at it in 1927. 

Practically all of his contemporaries have retired, but Trammell can be found peri- 
odically making the rounds of the New York agencies, telling the story of his station 
and market to the younger generation of timebuyers as well as the old. 

Among the pioneers Trammell rated as radio's No. 1 salesman. 

Nielsen interposes a demurrer re the 27 June SPONSOR HEARS crack on how 
it varies from ARB on the percentage of stations the average home reaches. 

Noted Nielsen: there are two distinct definitions of viewability its service offers; 
namely, the stations that the average home can view vs. the stations it can and does view. 

That tug-of-war between NBC TV and ABC TV over who's got Queen for a 
Day isn't the first time that a thing of this kind has happened. 

Back in the 1930's NBC thought it had the rights to the Madison Square Garden 
u rapped up in perpetuity but Mutual snagged them away from under NBC's nose. 

NBC counterclaimed but Mutual had the sponsor, Gillette, on its side, and the rights' 
owner, the late Mike Jacobs, wasn't the one to scorn a bird in hand and he stuck along 
with Mutual. There the fights remained for several years. 

When you read about one of the top rung agencies losing an account of major 
dimensions — like Shell Oil — there's an interesting angle to consider. 

The defection may not cause more than a ripple in the home office but it could have 
important consequences for the branch offices. 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



ROBERT McLEAN 
IS THE 

PACESETTER 

IN ICE SKATING 

He covered 50 yards in 5 seconds! 




sai 



IS CINCINNATI'S 

PACESETTER 

RADIO STATION 

WSAI offers Cincinnati's most comprehen- 
sive drug and cosmetic merchandising 
plan . . guaranteed display in 42 high- 
traffic drug stores, plus counter cards and 
window streamers. Your product as the 
WSAI Special of the Week insures sales 
response from the thousands of shoppers 
who make WSAI a daily listening habit. 
In Merchandising . . in Programming . . 
in Productivity . . WSAI is Cincinnati's 
PACESETTER Radio Station. 



Represented Nationally by gill- perna New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, Detroit, Atlanta 
THE CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS WSAI - Cincinnati; WPEN - Philadelphia; WALT - Tampa 



• 11 JULY 1960 



ADVERTISERS 



NEWS & IDEA 

i WRAP-UP 



BE-BARRELED TWOSOME, advertising 'All I Have on is the 
kisses, theater passes and generated goodwill in downtown Bir 
and promote the station as Birmingham's first 100% country 



new WYAM,' distributed candy 
ningham recently, to celebrate 
ind western music radio outlet 




BREAKFAST, arranged by SPONSOR for a regional CBS promotion managers' meeting in At- 
lanta, grouped (l-r) Burt Toppan, WTVJ, Miami; KenTredwell and John Dillon, WBTV, Charlotte 



A lot of that toy spot tv business 
ma> he jeopardized a« a result I 
of a citation last week by the | 
FTC. 

Named for alleged giving and : 
ceiving of unlawful allowances and \ 
payments for advertising was an as- 
sociation of toy wholesalers and I 
seven toy manufacturers. 

Specifically noted in the complaint 
was the payment of money for ad- 
vertising on tv programs. 

Among the manufacturers named i 
were Ideal Toy. Parker Bros.. Ameri- 
can Machine & Foundry and the 
Transogram Co. 

Campaign : 

• Prince Macaroni has sched- 
uled the largest New England spot 
campaign in radio history. Stations 
carrving Prince schedules will air a j 
commercial every 15 minutes, during 
the 18-hour broadcasting dav. for a 
total of 2.235 announcements weeklv. 



IWr 



35TH ANNIVERSARY inspired showing 
photo of 35-year-old WCSH, Portland, Me., 
control room, transmitter with James Nichol- 
son, first commercially licensed broadcast 




These are in addition to five-minute 
ocal news broadcasts. Markets carry- 
ing the campaign: Boston, Hartford, 
New Haven, Portland, and Provi- 
dence. 

Thisa 'n' data: Bell & Howell, 

sponsor of the CBS Reports program 
"Who Speaks for the South?" to date 
has received 456 letters (only 14 un- 
favorable) about its 27 May telecast. 
Officials of the camera company had 
been warned that sponsorship of that 
program may result in boycotts, de- 
creased sales, etc. Now a month later, 
the company reports, none of these 
predictions materialized ... A joint 
promotion by Aluminum Co. of 
America and Montgomery Ward 
will introduce the new Ward Tru-Cold 
line refrigerator on Alcoa's 19 July 
network tv show (NBC TV) . . . The 
Florida Citrus Commission (B&B) 
will spend $4,080,000 on media ad- 
vertising for the next fiscal year . . . 
Philip Morris estimates its 1960 
sales at over $500 million, approxi- 
mately $40 million more than last 



Company acquisition: Pillsbury 
Co. has purchased the Tidy House 
Products Co., Shenandoah, Iowa. 
The move marks Pillsbury's first ven- 
ture into the non-food grocery prod- 
ucts field. Management of Tidy House 
will be unchanged, with J. Cy Rapp, 
president of the Tidy House becom- 
ing general manager of the new Pills- 
bury division. 

Strictly personnel: Recent elec- 
tions at American Home Products: 
William F. Laporte, to president; 
Herbert E. Carnes, to board vice 
chairman; H. W. Blades, to execu- 
tive v.p. and director; and Kenneth 
A. Bonham to executive v.p. . . . 
Sidney Wallach, to advertising 
manager of North American opera- 
tions at Massey-Ferguson Ltd., Toron- 
to .. . Raymond H. Schmidt, to 
advertising manager at Wallace Sil- 
versmiths, a Hamilton subsidiary, and 
Melvin J. Evans, named manager 
of advertising operations for the par- 
ent company . . . James A. Gordon, 
to assistant advertising manager at 
H. J. Heinz Co. 



AGENCIES 



McCann-Erickson and DFS ap- 
parently weren't going to let 
Bates get away with having the 
only cigarette account sponsoring 
the conventions and the elec- 
tions. 

Bates delivered Brown & William- 
son to NBC TV and McCann and 
DFS came back with Liggett & Myers 
as the sponsor of these events on Mu- 
tual at a package price of $150,000. 

What L&M is getting: 1,186 par- 
ticipations, or 936 commercial min- 
utes, from 5 July to 1 January, in- 
volving the conventions, the cam- 
paigns, the World Today news, elec- 
tion returns and whatnot. 

NBC Radio couldn't take a ciga- 
rette as sponsor of the conventions 
because of the B&W tieup on NBC TV 
and this week was without a dollar's 
commitments for the Chicago and 
L.A. coverage. It offered a sixth for 
$90,000. NBC Radio affiliates will 
coop half the 66 convention hours. 

Agency appointments: Swift & 



BEAST MEETS MAN as Robert Hyland 
(c), CBS-gen. mgr. KMOX (St. Louis), toys 
with elephant's ear following show for visit- 
ing CBS radio spot salesmen. Below (l-r): 
zoo attendant; spot salesmen John Francis, 
Bob Price; zoo director George Vierheller 




'BIG RED,' KSTT, 
staged by station's 
ed) from a mobile 
unperturbed by rai 



Davenport, la., marathon, 
'Fat' Pat Patterson (seat- 
news unit, finds Patterson 
i as he sits through haircut 





wm» 



A LAFFING MATTER! Clellan Card, better known as 'Axel' on WCCO-TV, Minneapolis, 
broadcasts each day from his Tree House set in Excelsior Amusement Park. The park honored 
Card by using his name on their new Laff House, which promises to be a big ticket seller 



"ARB '-0METER SAYS 
ROCHESTER'S CHANNEL 10 

NEW YORK 

CLIMATE Better Than Ever! 






ARB REPORT 

Rochester Metropolitan Area 
March, 1960 



(4 weeks average) 






The nice thing about our "climate," here at CHANNEL 10, 
Rochester, N. Y., is that it gets better all the time! Year 
after year, the surveys agree that we offer the best buy in 
Rochester TV! 



56.7 



OVER-ALL 
SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



18 



20 



off the top LU favorite 
TV programs in Rochester 

and off 1/4 hours delivering 
more than 60,000 homes: 

CH.IO has StaB has 

© I© 

CHANNEL lO 

(WVET-TV • WHEC-TV) 



EVERETT-McKINNEY, INC. 



THE BOLLING CO. INC. 



Co.'s canned meats to DFS from Mc- 
Cann-Erickson, billing $250,000 . . . 
New York World's Fair 1964-65 Cor- 
poration to JWT . . . National Guard. 
billing $400,000, renewed with 
Fletcher Richards, Calking & 
Holden . . . Shockley Transistor. 
Palo Alto, to Chambers Wiswell 
Shattuck Clifford & McMillan, 
Boston. 

Merger: Grey Advertising and 
L. H. Hart in an Co., with joint bill- 
ings of S50.5 million. 

Expanding : McCann-Marschalk 

will open a Boston office located at 
200 Berkeley Street. The new facility 
will be in addition to the separate 
Boston office of McCann-Erickson. 
the parent company. Paul N. Swat 
field will be manager of the office. 

Change of name: McCann-Erick- 
son's Cleveland office to McCann- 
Marschalk Co., a newly created di- 
vision of McCann-Erickson, Inc. 

Consolidation: Tatham-Laird, 

Chicago, has merged its radio-tv com- 
mercial production and copy depart- 
ments. The combined department is 
under the direction of Jerrv Birn. 

Admen on the move: Patrick 
Dolan, BBDO International presi- 
dent, elected to board . . . Roger A. 
Purdon, to creative director of Mc- 
Cann-Erickson. N. Y. . . . Stuart E. 
Hample and W. S. Mowat, to v.p.'s 
at BBDO . . . James R. Franken- 
berry to Fletcher Bichards, Calkins 
& Holden as v.p. and account super- 
visor . . . Norton Weber, to v.p. at 
EWRB. Pittsburgh . . . Anthony C. 
DePierro to v.p. in charge of media, 
Gever, Morey, Madden & Ballard. 



A significant legal action taken 
this week may have wide impor- 
tance in removing obstacles from 
tv sale of motion pictures: 

A U. S. government complaint was 
dismissed which had questioned the 
legality of Screen Gems' acquisition 
of 600 Universal Pictures features for 
tv sale in 1957. 

The dismissal took place under 
Judge William C. Herlands. U. S. Dis- 
trict Court. Southern District of N.Y. 

It was ruled that the acquisition 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



r 



was neither a price-fixing move 
nor did it substantially lessen com- 
petition. 

Since April 1958 the court had re- 
strained Screen Gems to a release of 
!no more than 50 of the features per 
year. 

An irony of the court ruling is that 
it clears the way for feature film sales 
at a time when the market for such 
product is at an all-time low. 

Sales: Romper Room (live syndica- 
tion) will be produced in Spanish on 
WAPA-TV, San Juan, starting in 
September; another foreign language 
production of the program already 
began in French . . . Rhinegold Beer 
renewed MCA's State Trooper on 
WNBC-TV, New York; other recent 
renewals include Falstaff, Schmidt, 
Carling's, Kroger, and R. J. Reynolds 
. . . Neese Sausage Co. and Dixie 
Crystal Sugars purchased Sea Hunt 
on WSOC-TV . . . NTA's Assignment: 
Underwater to WNEW-TV. New 
York; WTTG, Washington: WBZ- 
TV. Boston . . . Cinema-Vue's Pathe 
Milestones of the Century to KCOP. 
Los Angeles; KPTV, Portland: KIRO- 
TV. Seattle: WFIL-TV, Philadelphia: 
WNBF-TV. Binghamton; WLYH-TV, 
Lebanon; WFBG-TV. Altoona; 
WNHC-TV, New Haven; KFRE-TV, 
Fresno; and KPLR, St. Louis; also 
Mickey Rooney to WABC-TV. New 
York; KPLR, St. Louis; WCKT, Mi- 
ami, and stations in Sydney. Mel- 
bourne, Adelaide, and Brisbane. 

Video tape notes: Ampex Aus- 
tralia. Pty.. Ltd. has been formed 
ivith Edmund J. Aleks as manag- 
ing director. The new unit becomes 
i subsidiary of Ampex International 
5. A. of Fribourg, Switzerland . . . 
Frank Gonzalez. Jr.. has been 
lamed southwest regional sales raan- 
iger and Gerald G. (Jerry) Rester 
bas been named eastern regional sales 
nanager of Ampex video products 
hvision. 

Wore sales : UAA's Mel-O-Toons to 
^GN-TV. Chicago; WBZ-TV, Bos- 



NOW 

onTV 



see 
'pages 



ton; WFIL-TV, Philadelphia; WNHC- 
TV, New Haven; KPRC-TV, Hous- 
ton; KTVK, Phoenix; WTVT, Tam- 
pa; KGMB. Honolulu; KLAS-TV, 
Las Vegas; WWLP-TV. Springfield; 
WFGB-TV, Altoona; KFRE-TV, Fres- 
no; WNBF-TV. Binghamton, and 
WLYH-TV. Lebanon. " 

Ziv-UA promotions: Six Ziv-UA 

executives receiving promotions are: 
Edward J. Broman, Chicago v.p.; 
Ray McGuire, manager of regional 
sales, New York office; Bob Brog- 
don, syndication sales manager, New 



York; Jack Puter, south central di- 
vision sales manager; Robert Reis, 
sales manager of new north central 
division, Chicago; and Mike Kiev- 
man, midcentral sales manager, Cin- 
cinnati. 

Commercials: John Savage, for- 
mer head of Crest Productions, ap- 
pointed motion picture production di- 
rector of Roger Wade, New York . . . 
Venice prize winners include Olin 
Mathieson packaging (D'Arcy), a 
first prize; Venice Cup to producer 
Playhouse Pictures for six best en- 



growing , growing • • • 

all the time ! 



76 and 17 

PONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




triea . . . Playhouse Pictures won 
three ol U\<- fird prizes in the Ad- 
vertising \— "« iation <-f t lit- \\ est 
I960 Ml W . -t. i ii l\ Competition. 

Strictly personnel j Benrj S. 

\\ bite to national sales manager of 
Genu; for three years pro- 
procurement director, h<- was 
previously advertising and promo- 
tion director . Bill iahworth to 
I \ \ - eastern sales <li\i>i<m: he was 
formerly with UAA's national sales 
division . . . William Russell will 
direct 10 episodes of Screen Gems' 



Drums the Menace . . .Walter J. 
Kaufman named assistant to the 
president and Marilyn Gold named 
publicity and advertising director, 
both at Flamingo Films. 

Trade note: Paul Pairan is a man 
who believes in what he sells — adver- 
tising. The Paul Pairan Advertis- 
ing Agency recently placed an order 
for itself selling its services on Play 
of the Week on KOA-TV, Denver. 

Feature film: Flamingo has ac- 
quired a group of 52 post-1953 fea- 



MINNEAPOLIS 
ST. PAUL 




WPBC 




ADULT 
?ADIO 



Adventures 



in 

Better 

Listening 

* Average \a hour share of audience — six a.m. to six p.r 
Monday through Friday — March-April NSI, Metro area 



William V. Stewart, 
WPBC President 



Broadcast Time Sales 
National Representatives 



ture films, all from foreign produc- 
ers, the Imperial Package. 

Free film: Association Films has 

released 26 half-hours of a public af- 
fairs series, Your Neighbor — The 
World. 



NETWORKS 



ABC TV on practically the eve of 
the opening of the Democratic 
convention found a batch of 
money for that and the Republi- 
can event. 

The quick sale included DuPont's 
auto anti-freeze products (BBDO). 
Mutual of Omaha (Bozell & Jacobs) 
and AVCO (B&B). 

A sixth of the coverage hours was 
turned back to the stations. 

The American League Football 
games on ABC TV this fall arc 
now sold out. 

Colgate and Shick Eversharp (both 
B&B) split the last available quarter 
between them at a consolidated cost 
of S 78,000. 

Others sharing the AFL games: 
General Cigar, Sinclair Oil, Pabst- 
Blatz. 

Network tv sales and renewals: 

Purex will sponsor Those Ragtime 
Years, a Project 20 production, to be 
aired on NBC TV in October . . . 
Union Carbide will participate in 
Laramie and Dan Raven on NBC TV 
this fall . . . Equitable Life Assur- 
ance Society has renewed for Our 
American Heritage on NBC TV — 
three one-hour and four half-hour 
programs. 

Network radio sale: Purolator 
Oil and Air Filters has purchased 
16 weeks of NBC Radio's Monitor — 
the spots will run through 16 Oc- 
tober. 

Programing notes: NBC Radio's 

Monitor will be extended on Friday 
nights during the summer — show will 
be broadcast from 8:05 to 10:45 p.m. 
EDT . . . Queen for a Day will move 
to ABC TV next year, scheduled for 
the 12:30 p.m. slot. 

New radio affiliates: ABC Radio: I 

WMNI. Columbus: KMED. Medford. 
Ore.: WREA, East Palatka, Fla.: 
WALF, Walterboro, S. C; and 



1 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 196C 



J^BRC, Birmingham, Ala. Re-affili- 
ited is WKVA, Lewistown, Pa. . . . 
Keystone Broadcasting: KBRI, 
3rinkley, Ark.; KBHC, Nashville, 
^rk. ; KHSJ, Hemet, Calif.; KGEK, 
J5terling, Colo.; WQXQ, Daytona 
[Beach; WSRA, Milton, Fla.; WKLE, 
Washington, Ga.; KYME, Boise; 
WMIC, St. Helen, Mich.; KEYL, 
Long Prairie, Minn.; WXTN, Lex- 
Rngton, Miss.; KTNC, Falls City, 
|Neb. ; WBMT, Black Mountain, N. C. ; 
)WCNF, Weldon, N.C.; KEYD, Oakes, 
|N. D.; WWCH, Clarion, Pa.; WCAY. 
Cayce/Columbia, S. C; WLIJ, Shel- 
byville, Tenn.; KARI, Blaine, Wash.; 
WCLG, Morgantown, W. Va. 

Network personnel notes: Mal- 
colm B. Laing, to NBC as regional 
manager, station relations . . . John 
Brookman resigned as sales and 
promotion assistant, NBC TV net 
sales, Chicago . . . Hugh F. Del 
Regno, has been named director of 
business affairs, NBC o&o's and Spot 
Sales. 



RADIO STATIONS 



BBDO's study on the current di- 
mensions of radio and various 
techniques for using it has been 
completed. 

The question now to be resolved: 
in what form is the study to be turned 
out? Indications are that the study 
will be available for the agency's ac- 
countmen and others by 1 August. 

The material is far more compre- 
hensive than the BBDO radio studv of 
1956. 

Keystone has entered the fm sta- 
tion package held. 

The basic rate: $146.80 per min- 
ute gross on 47 stations. 

The selling subsidiary: Fm Broad- 
casting System. Inc. 

Pulse reports that out-of-home 
listening during the past winter 
was higher than any winter pre- 
viously studied. 

Some highlights of the study: 

• An average of 4.6% of all U.S. 
radio families listened to radios oth- 
er than at home between 6 a.m. and 
midnight: 

• This January-April figure 
(4.6%) is only 8% below the aver- 
age for out-of-home listening for the 



peak July-August period which came 
to 5% ; 

• The cities with the highest level 
of out-of-home listening were New 
York and Kansas City. They reached 
5.4% each. 

Ideas at work: 

• Stick 'em up: D.j.'sat WCKR, 
Miami, had a bang-up time when 
they were visited by Hugh O'Brian, 
tv's Wyatt Earp. After getting a few 
pointers from the cowboy, the record 
spinners went into competition. The 
idea: youngsters competed for tro- 
phies and transistor radios by trying 
to "outdraw" the gun-slinging radio 
men. 

• Literati: WEAV-AM-FM, 
Plattsburgh, N. Y., challenged the 
minds and pens of school boys in a 
contest run in conjunction with the 
Hall of Fame baseball game it aired. 
The idea: participants were to com- 
pose an essay telling which major 
league player they would elect to the 
Hall of Fame. Winner was treated to 
a full day of festivities at Coopers- 
town and a ticket to the game. 

• Low flying : KOIL, Omaha, to 
celebrate its 35th anniversary, ready- 
ing an air drop. 30,000 Hawaiian 
necklaces will be dropped from a low 
flying plane and each will carry a 
prize winning ticket. The finder may 
win a tv set, radio, record album, or 
many other items. 

• Popular principal: K-BOX, 
Dallas, received more than 100,000 
entries in its "Principal of the Year" 
contest. The idea: Dallasites were to 
vote for their favorite school princi- 
pal in the city. 

• Question of the day: WSB, 
Atlanta, has inaugurated, for the 
third season, its summer promotion, 
"Pop-Calls." The idea: Guests are 
selected at random, from the "Pop- 
Call" car, asked the question-for-the- 
day, and receive a bag of groceries 
for their answer. 

• Key to the kingdom: WINS, 
N. Y., is giving away a one-year lease 
for a new luxury apartment to some 
New York resident. The idea : listen- 
ers send in as many old keys as they 
want, tagged with their name. The 
keys will be spread on the ground and 
a crane, manned by five blindfolded 
steeplejacks, will dip into the pile for 
a winner. If the winner doesn't want 
to relocate, he can act as landlord 



for that period and collect the rent. 

Thisa 'n' data: Maggie McNellis' 

Celebrity Talk celebrated its 400th 
broadcast on Trand Radio Network 
. . . WEJL, Scranton, to make a 
stronger impression on drivers, an- 
nounces number of arrests made dur- 
ing a holiday weekend due to careless 
driving . . . Billy Taylor and Larry 
Fuller, radio personalities of WLIB, 
N. Y., will do a half-hour tv special 
for Nordeutscher Rundfunk, a Ger- 
man tv company . . . WIL, St. Louis, 
is spearheading a campaign to locate 
folks not counted in the census check 
. . . WLIB, N. Y., is providing com- 
plete coverage of the Democratic Na- 
tional Convention. 

Business notes: Dannon Yogurt 
(Zlowe), has purchased WCBS, New 
York, complete political package of 
spot announcements . . . Ohio Fed- 
eral Savings & Loan Co., signed with 
WTVN, Columbus, for the third con- 
secutive year. 

Kudos: Arthur Simon, elected 

president of New York Pioneers . . . 
Southern California Broadcasters As- 




WHBF 



RADIO and TELEVISION 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




Sales Management's Survey of Buying 
Power says: "The presence of armed 
forces frequently constitutes a hidden 
plus; their average income, while well 
below the national average, frequently 
is largely available for discretionary 
spending." 

Twenty -five major naval commands 
(comprising the world's largest naval 
installations), plus 7 important army 
and air force commands, located in the 
Norfolk-Newport News metro area 
create a hidden plus we estimate con- 
servatively at $200 MILLION annually. 
For example, a civilian would have to 



earn $8,408 to equal navy pay of $3,709, 

plus allowances, income tax differential, 

retirement plan, health services, and 

1 other 4 fringe benefits — including 

\ $5 *j country club dues, and 

W 10 ° §• theater tickets! 

1 Thus J \ the more than S150 mil- 
- lion paid to service people living in 
Tidewater equals about S350 million of 
civilian payroll. In other words, here is a 
hidden plus of $200 million not reported 
in the SM Survey of Buying Power, or 
elsewhere. And we have not included here 
the fleet based navy payroll of $123,199,- 
602 in (1959), much of which is spent in 



11 JULY 1960 



\ MONTH irv TIDEWTAR, VA 




« jfet 



FOUND: $200 Million of 



e Income 






Tidewater. 

Also please note that retail sales figures 
as reported in SM Survey of Buying 



Power and elsewhere do 
elude sales in Tide- <n 
many commissar- 
exchanges, ships' >~*J 
and service clubs. 

f\ 

Tidewater is a ^ - 



t 



not in- 
water's 
ies, post 

stores, 



market 
centration 
the entire 
than 820,000 
report) in half 
Atlanta or 
is a better way to 
it, for WTAR-TV 



» 



. . . greatest con- 

of people in 

Southeast . . . more 

(new census 

the area of metro 

Miami! Tidewtar 

spell it, and sell 

is the most power- 



tremendous 



ful advertising medium in the market — 
No. 1 in every audience survey ever 
made here! 



W7TPZ^£}^ 



Represented bij ( Edward! Pet ry aYco., Inc.) The Original Station Representative 



NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 
CHANNEL 3 




11 JULY 1960 



km i.ih. .11 award t<- the Los ^ng< lea 
Dutrii i I incoln- Mercurj Dealers 
KM I.. i its "effective and creative 
radio i arnpaigns" . . . Catholic Broad- 
, . i — 1 1 - 1 — \ --... iation's "Gold Bell 
Award* 1 to KMO\. Si. Louis . . . 
Alpha Epailon Rho broadcasting 
award to John MeGoff, manage] ..I 
\\>\\ \| | \i. | Bat Lansing, Michi- 
-an . . . Jaycees Annual Radio-Tv 
Uard i.. .hu-k Carney, \\ II- St 
I ouis . . . W BC I amp of Knowl- 
award to KDk \. Pittsburgh 
\\, ni.il Health Citation to WADS, 
Vnsonia, Conn. 

Station staffers] V. B. Hartman, 
to sales manager of WBZ/WBZA, 
Boston . . . Robert Doherty to ac- 
< mint executive at KRAK, Stockton- 
"vic ramento, Calif. . . . Don L. 
Pierce, to general manager at 
W \i \. Siler City, N. C. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



\\ CBS Radio is going the way of 
it- lister New York flagship, 
W < HS TV. 

Starting with October, WCBS Ra- 
dii, will have its own sales staff to 
cover New York for national spot. 
It'll use CBS Radio Spot sales in all 
other markets. 

W CHS TV circumscribed CBS TV 
Spot Sales in a similar way the year 
before. 

K«'l> appointments — stations: 

Y\ DOK, Cleveland, to H-R Reps . . . 
\U\I\I, Baltimore, to Walker-Ra- 
walt . . . KEY-T, Santa Barbara, to 
Young Tv Corp . . . KCMJ, Palm 
Springs, to United Spot Sales. 

Rep appointments — personnel: 
John Walker, to manager of Daren 
I . McGavren St. Louis office. . . Dav- 
id Simmons to v.p. at Trand Associ- 
ates, N. Y Marvin W. Harms, 

Jr., to midwest assistant director of 
t\ sales at Wery-Knodel . . . Samuel 
T. Jones, to assistant treasurer at 
Katz. 



NOW 

onTV 



see 
'pages 



76 and 17 



TV STATIONS 



The top advertisers in 1959 spent 
more than half of their budget 
(50.6%) in tv. 

According to TvB estimates, a total 
of $1,081,533,569 was spent in meas- 
ured media. Tv network and spot 
share was $850,361,281. 

All but three of the top 10 used 
tv, with 68 of them deeming it as 
their basic medium. 

In terms of ratio: 48 spent over 
50% on tv; 25, over two-thirds; 15 
over 80% and nine, over 90%. 

NBC TV doesn't think that the 
Federal Court (Philadelphia) 
will uphold the San Francisco 
Chronicle's efforts to stay the 
sale of KTVU to the network. 

Noted NBC: the Department of 
Justice investigated the proposed sale 
and saw no violation of the antitrust 
laws. (For more see WASHINGTON 
WEEK, page 59.) 

Television Personal Interviews 
surveyed over 2,000 households 
to determine the effect of vio- 
lence on tv. 

The three questions which were de- 
signed as a basis on which to deter- 
mine the effects of this type of pro- 
graming were: 1) do you restrict 
your children's tv viewing, 2) has 
tv a good, bad or no influence on 
children, 3) are violence programs 
well-spaced throughout the evening? 

The results: parents who control 
their children's tv viewing are more 
favorably disposed to the medium; 
no real difference was found between 
the two groups in their answer to the 
"violence" question. Statistics: 56.2% 
control viewing, while 43.8% do not. 

Ideas at work: 

• Humanitarians all: WTRF- 

TV, Wheeling, W. Va., turned its 
gimmick "Clutch Cargo Humanitari- 
an Award" legit. The tv station and 
local police department honored a 
parking lot attendant for "service be- 
yond the call of duty" (he permitted 
an officer to store his rain gear on 
the lot). The award became so well 
known that the two decided to make 
it really mean something. First re- 
cipient was a 12-year-old who saved 
a friend from drowning. 

• Census count: WTVJ, Miami, 
sponsored a "South Florida Census 



Contest" for about 2,500 nation 
agency and client personnel. Tl 
idea: participants were to estima 
the population figure for the 12 cou_ 
ties within the station's coverage. Tl 
winner received a vacation for two 
a Miami hotel. 

Thisa 'n' data : Tv cameras are m 
permitted to cover City Council mee 
ings in Chicago . . . WOOD-AM-TA 
Grand Rapids, had its sixth annu; 
Antique Auto Tour . . . Dr. Fran 
Stanton, CBS president, presented 
gift of $75,000 to KETC, St. Loui 
educational tv station . . . KRCW 
TV, San Francisco, prepared a bool< 
let dubbed "Through the USSR,"- 
it gives a reporter's view of life i 
the Soviet Union . . . Supreme Coui 
of Ohio's decision on the ABA Canoi 
35 (the restraint which prevented thi 
use of camera and tape in court) doe) 
not prohibit their use for subsequent 
broadcast. 

Hot beat: KPLR-TV, St. Louis, 
made a tv "first." The station's tv 
cameras arrived at the scene of a 
major fire before the fire department, 

Kudos: WDSU-TV, New Orleans, 
recipient of the "Gold Bell" award of 
the Catholic Broadcasters Association 
for the "outstanding local tv program 
of the year" . . . Mac Ward, v.p. 
and director of news for KNOE-AM- 
TV, Monroe, La., elected chairman 
of the Louisiana-Mississippi Associ- 
ated Press Broadcasters Association 
. . . KPHO-TV, Phoenix, last week 
received two Emmy awards for its 
It's Wallace children's series . . . 
KRON-TV, San Francisco, awarded 
the School Bell Award from the Na- 
tional Education Association . . . 
WBNS-TV, Columbus, won AFA 
award for the best trade paper series 
of ads — prepared by Corbett Adver- 
tising. 

On the personnel front: Harry 
Wheeler, named local sales manag- 
er for WHDH-TV-AM-FM, Boston 
. . . George Moynihan, to executive 
producer at Westinghouse Broadcast- 
ing Co. in New York . . . Robert 
Heller, to promotion director at I 
WXEX-TV, Richmond, Va. . . . Peter ' 
B. Kenney, to station manager at 
WRC-TV, Washington . . . William 
L. Woods, to national sales man- 
ager at WCTV, Tallahassee, Fla.- 
Thomasville, Ga. ^ 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



WHAT HAPPENS 
WHEN A NATION 
SPENDS MORE 

ON GAMBLING 
THAN IT SPENDS FOR 
HIGHER EDDCATION ? 



f you can find any Romans around, ask them. They lived 
retty high on the hog in their day. That is, until some 
erious-minded neighbors from up North moved in. The 
est is ancient history. 

r orfd think their fate would have taught us a lesson. 
r et today we Americans spend twenty billion dollars a 
ear for legalized gambling, while we spend a niggardly 
our-and-a-half billion for higher education. Think of 
\ ! Over four times as much ! We also spend six-and-a- 
alf billion dollars a year for tobacco, nine billion dol- 
irs for alcoholic beverages, and billions more on other 
on-essentials. 

?em'£ we read the handwriting on the wall ? 
>ur very survival depends on the ability of our colleges 
nd universities to continue to turn out thinking men 
nd women. Yet today many of these fine institutions are 
ard put to make ends meet. Faculty salaries, generally, 
re so low that qualified teachers are leaving the campus 
n alarming numbers for better-paying jobs elsewhere. 



In the face of this frightening trend, experts estimate 
that by 1970 college applications will have doubled. 
If we are to keep our place among the leading nations of 
the world, we must do something about this grim situa- 
tion before it is too late. The tuition usually paid by a 
college student covers less than half the actual cost of 
his education. The balance must somehow be made up 
by the institution. To meet this deficit even the most 
heavily endowed colleges and universities have to de- 
pend upon the generosity of alumni and public spirited 
citizens. In other words, they depend upon you. 
For the sake of our country and our children, won't you 
do your part? Support the college of your choice today. 
Help it to prepare to meet the challenge of tomorrow. The 
rewards will be greater than you think. 



It's important for you to know what the impending college crisis 
means to you. Write for a free booklet to HIGHER EDUCATION, 
Box 36, Times Square Station, New York 36, New York. 



(ffit 



"W 



Sponsored as a public service 
in co-operation with The Council for Financial Aid to Education 



PONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



I KNOW 
A MAN 



who is one of the best sales 
executives in the business 
today, He is immediately 
available due to a recent 
merger, 

Leaders in publishing, tele- 
vision and media enthusias- 
tically endorse this man's 
imagination, drive and abil- 
ity to create success, 

His experience in opera- 
tions, sales, advertising 
and promotion merit your 
attention. 



Write Box 67 

SPONSOR 

40 E. 49th St. 

New York 17, N. Y. 



^ 




Tv and radio 



Harry Wheeler has assumed his new peti- 
tion of local sales manager at WHDH-AM / 
FM-TV, Boston. He brings to his new pos 
20 years of broadcasting sales experience ' 
which includes a stint as sales manager for 
WCOP-Radio, Boston, and as the New 
England representative for ZIV Televisioi t | 
Programs. For the past six years, Wheelei I 
headed his own firm of radio and televisior M 



;; 



representatives which was sold last month to George Eckles. He live- 
in Brookline. Mass., with his wife and two sons, Todd and Jeffrev 



Selvin Donneson has been elected vice 

president of the Long Island Broadcasting 

Corp. (WWRL & WRFM). He joined 

WWRL in 1947 as a salesman and became 

sales manager five years later. Donneson 

is known as one of the pioneers of Negro- 

appeal radio through his association with 

the New York station, which is primarily 

a Negro and Spanish-language outlet. 

^ RFM is an fm station which airs "good music" exclusively. 

neson's new post will include certain managerial responsib: 




Don- 

lities. 




James L. Wichert was named director o: 
advertising and sales promotion for Chi 
ler and Imperial Division. In 1946, he 
joined the automobile corporation as dis- 
trict manager, and in two years, was ap- 
pointed Detroit regional manager. Wich- 
ert became the advertising director for De- 
Soto in 1953, and assumed the additional 
responsibilities of sales promotion two 
years later. Before entering the automotive sales field, the new direc- 
tor's activities were in the auto financing, parts and accessories lines. 

Frank Merklein joins TvB next week as 
director of member sales presentations, su- 
pervising the new color and black-and-white 
tv tape recorder operation being installed 
in TvB's New York headquarters. Merk- 
lein has been with NBC for the past 12 
years, working in every phase of its techni- 
cal operations. In 1958, he was RCA rep- 
resentative to the Brussels World Exposi- 
tion. In 1957 he was selected by NBC to tour German tv installations 
for the State Department. Merklein is a graduate of the RCA Institute. 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




3MMERCIALS 

'ontinued from page 38) 
0, and earning a total of 25 cer- 
icates. The combined affiliates of 
abert Lawrence also won nine 
Yards and a total of 26 certificates, 
th Grantray-Lawrence of Los An- 
tes sharing two awards with Play- 
use Pictures of California. (Two 
ots for the Minneapolis Gas Com- 
iny through Knox Reeves were 
dged as an entry and awarded top 
izes in consumer service and local 
( itegories). 

Playhouse was a close third in win- 
ings, earning eight Awards (one 
lared with Stan Freberg and two 
ith Grantray-Lawrence) and a total 
f 20 certificates. The highest num- 
er of certificates (28) will actually 
to to MPO of New York, which won 
;ix awards and placed 20 films among 
ae Top 250 and two in the 25 Clas- 
ics. Representative of the awards 
pread among producers is Fred Niles 
> roductions of Chicago which won 5 
Awards and 13 certificates. (For de- 
ails, see charts pages 39, 40.) 

Geographically, as might be ex- 
acted, the preponderance of certifi- 
ates will be divided between the two 
:oasts. Forty-seven of the winners 
54%) were produced by New York 
ompanies. Twenty-seven winners 
32%) were produced by West Coast 
ompanies. Thirteen winners (14%) 
sere produced in other areas of this 
ountry and Canada. 

Entries were limited to commer- 
ials appearing on television in the 
J. S. and Canada between 31 March 
.959 and 31 March 1960. The bulk 
>f the entries similarly came from 
'few York and West Coast based 
tgencies and producers — 49% of the 
intrants being New Yorkers, while 
.9% claim the West Coast, 10% 
leadquarter in the midwest, and 22% 
ire scattered throughout the country, 
rhese ratios hold up fairly consistent- 
I in analyzing the Top 250 selections 
ind the winners. 

There were 1327 commercials en- 
ered in all. Eighty-eight agencies 
'branch offices counted separately) 
iccounted for 757 entries or 57% of 
he total, while 560 entries (42%) 
:ame from 75 production companies 
ind 10 entries directly from adver- 
isers (see chart page 38). 

Plans and procedures for this First 
\merican Tv Commercials Festival & 
Forum were set by a Tv Commercials 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



Council of fifty eminent advertising 
executives from all sections of the 
country. The 1327 entries were first 
screened by judging teams of between 
five and eight members of the Coun- 
cil according to their product cate- 
gory. The Top 250 which were se- 
lected were then screened by the en- 
tire Council in order to determine the 
awards. Names of agencies and pro- 
duction companies were not furnished 
to the judges, whose criteria of selec- 
tion were believability, demonstra- 
tion, identification, tastefulness, en- 
tertainment, information and impact. 
The Council, which is headed by 
John P. Cunningham, chairman of 
the board of Cunningham and Walsh, 
numbers among its members some 34 
agency copy, art, creative and pro- 
duction executives; also 13 directors 
of advertising and marketing of ma- 
jor corporations, the president of a 
leading independent tv station and 
two important members of the adver- 
tising trade press. SPONSOR endorsed 
the Festival in this first year as part 
of its Leadership role in broadcast- 
ing. Future festivals, which are 
planned as an annual event, are ex- 
pected to receive industry-wide sup- 
port from general advertising and 
broadcasting groups. ^ 



TEN SECONDS 

(Continued from page 37) 
of CBS and NBC, however, do not 
display a readiness to follow ABC's 
course. From both outfits come ex- 
pressions of apprehension similar to 
those of the agencies. CBS station re- 
lations v.p. Carl Ward stated that for 
the foreseeable future his network 
would be holding the line on evening 
chainbreaks. Likewise Don Mercer 
NBC station relations director, who 
called the ABC plan, should it become 
operational, "one more factor" to be 
considered in the continual review of 
affiliate requests for more time. 

The NAB Code has been revised, 
effective 30 October, 1960, to allow 
for lengthened stationbreaks. Where- 
as the old version refers to "the es- 
tablished practice of reserving for 
station use the last 30 seconds of each 
program for stationbreak and spot 
announcements," the altered code 
reads, "the aggregate total of the an- 
nouncements [at stationbreak] shall 
not exceed 70 seconds within the sta- 
tion's highest rate period for an- 
nouncements." ^ 



PUBLIC SERVICE SHOWS 

{Continued from page 42) 

• There's a general lack of interest 
in forum and world affairs programs 
unless they are truly informative and 
authoritative, with a strong feeling 
that such programs should not be 
used as a sounding board for propa- 
ganda or axe grinding. 

• Less than 3% of those respond- 
ing mentioned the need for more cul- 
tural or educational programs al- 
though there were several additional 
favorable comments on such pro- 
grams now on the air. A listing of 
program preferences by type appears 
in the chart, on page 41. 

In this survey, 51% of the re- 
spondents said they would not like 
to see more forum and panel pro- 
grams dealing with current world 
problems, with 49% saying they 
would. When asked if they were in 
favor of canceling regularly sched- 
uled programs between 7:30 and 11 
p.m. for public service shows, 58% 
said no and 42% said yes. If such 
programs were available — an even 
number, 43%, said they would and 
would not watch, with 14% respond- 
ing they didn't know. Viewers were, 
however, in favor of canceling regu- 
larly scheduled programing for spe- 
cials or sports events — 54% for the 
specials, 56% for football, 58% for 
basketball and 60% for baseball. 

Some sample viewer comments, 
which ranged from a sentence to a 
full typewritten page: "We get to- 
gether for viewing between 8 and 11, 
and enjoy entertainment. It's our 
only time for forgetting work and 
problems, so we want to be enter- 
tained. We do think we should have 
a better informed public in current 
world affairs, but after the rush and 
pressure of the day it's good to sit 
and be entertained by outstanding 
talent with a good laugh thrown in 
. . . (Public service shows) are gen- 
erally stiff, rigged ahead of time, a 
rehash of what you already know . . . 
They never arrive at any conclusion 
. . . Most are merely segments of view- 
ing time used by interested parties to 
promote pet projects." ^ 



NOW 

onTV 



see 
'pages 



16 and 17 

75 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



It is not too often that a man in the radio/tv field has solid experience as both 
buyer and seller. The writer of the piece below has. He is Fletcher Turner, 
national .sales director of WRAL-TV, Raleigh, North Carolina. Turner spent, 
OS he points out below, nine years as a timebuyer in New York before turn- 
ing to the selling end of the business. His comments about the problems of 
visiting station men should be instantly recognizable, and his balanced views 
on what can be done about the problems should be of interest to many. 




OH, THAT LONG WAIT I 

/\l the beginning of this article I would like to 
point out that I was a timebuyer in New York for 
nine years. It was before the hectic days of televi- 
sion, but at that time it seemed hectic enough. There 
were many nights when the midnight oil burned. 
After that I was a salesman for two New York radio 
stations and a rep salesman, before returning to my 
home town. 

Because I have been on both sides of the fence I 
know something of the problems buyers and station 
men face, and have several suggestions which may 
be of value to all. 

\- \<>u all probably know, when a station or sales 
manager visits major agency centers, his objective is 
to make as many "good" calls as possible. General- 
ly the station's rep arranges for the visitor to call 
upon the buyers he feels he must see (he cannot see 
everyone he would like to during a week's trip, 
hence the most pressing calls are set up first). 

Then comes the long wait in the agency lobby. 
One appointment time runs into another, until he is 
hopelessly lost and his other appointments are per- 
turbed due to his lateness. As a former timebuyer, 
1 realize that there are times when the buyer must 
attend to pressing matters and thus can't see the sta- 
tion man when scheduled. However, it would be 
beneficial for everyone if he were notified in ad- 
vance (when possible, of course) that he will have 
to wait. This would give the visitor a chance to 



N THE AGENCY LOBBY! 

notify his other appointments or postpone his call till) 
a more opportune time. Then, too, the buyer cai 
tend to his problems without undue haste. 

By the same token, once in the buyer's office his 
sales story is continually interrupted by a barrage of 
phone calls, and it is obvious the sales story is not 
hitting home. An apparently easy solution would be 
for the secretary to take all calls for the next 10 
minutes or so, which would permit the station man to 
complete his story. 

Something which doesn't occur too often, fortu- 
nately, but when it does is most embarrassing to the 
station representative as well as the station manager, 
is the "automatic buy," where other stations in a 
market are not given an opportunity to submit avail- 
abilities. Certainly a hurried buy that involves a 
spot adjacent to Gunsmoke or Wagon Train is under- 
standable, but these are the exception rather than the 
rule. A truly objective study cannot predetermine 
which single station or two stations offer the better 
buy. In this type of buy the decision is based on past 
knowledge, which may be completely antiquated or 
fallacious. Only through competitive selling will the 
client receive equal value for his dollar. 

These apply to only a small percentage of the 
buyers I have called upon. In the main I feel the 
timebuyer works harder and has more responsibility 
in spending the client's money wisely than most 
sellers realize. ^ 



11 JULY 1960 





TV/RADIO 

■"RECTORY 



SUBSCRIBER 

fttmmmm 

Our apologies to 

Atlanta, St. Louis, Boston, 

Dallas and some other cities! 



The new 5-City Directory, just off the press, 
contains more than 1900 listings, and 36 pages. 

It's the recognized tv/radio guide to 5 cities 
where 93% of all national spot business is 
bought. 

The 1960 directory is substantially bigger than 
any of its predecessors. You will find it more 
useful, and we hope you will forgive us if your 
city is not included. 

If you're a SPONSOR subscriber drop us a note 
and we'll send you a 5-City Directory with our 
compliments. 

If not, the price is 50£ each . . . 40<: in quanti- 
ties of 5 to 10 . . . 30$ for 10 or more. 

If you're not a subscriber, enter your subscrip- 
tion now by using the form shown on this page. 
We'll send you, as a bonus, not only the 5-City 
Directory but also the 220 page 1959-60 Air 
Media Basics including Radio Basics, Tv 
Basics, Timebuying Basics, and much more. 




□ Send me copies of Sponsor's 5-city directory. 

□ Enter my subscription to Sponsor 
for one year at $8.00 and send me FREE 

the 5-CITY DIRECTORY & AIR MEDIA BASICS. 



NAME 

TITLE 

COMPANY. 
ADDRESS- 
CITY 



V.... ............................ J 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 



SPONSOR 



A project for the industry 

\\ hen \\ allace A. Ross approached sponsor last fall with 
his plan for an American Tv Commercials Festival, we were 
immediately impressed with the idea. 

We recognized that the industry had long needed a pro- 
fessional forum for the review of outstanding tv sales mes- 
we knew that meaningful awards by competent judges 
would help raise both the practices and the prestige of the tv 
advertising business. 

I • i ling tlii- way, sponsor was glad to lend its support and 
backing to the First American Tv Festival, and we are de- 
lighted with the results that were obtained. 

With over 1.300 entries, judged by a blue ribbon panel of 
50 practicing advertising men, the Festival was a huge and 
unqualified success. 

Plans are now under way for the 1961 Festival and, at this 
point, we'd like to make our position clear. 

We believe that these festivals should be supported by the 
entire industry — that they should be identified not with one 
trade publication, but with all sections of the business con- 
cerned with tv selling. 

sponsor will always follow the commercials festivals care- 
fully and be proud of our part in getting them started. But 
the project is too big. and too important to be tied to any 
Bingle segment of the industry. 

For this reason, we urge now that such groups as the 4A's, 
W \. \f \. and NAB take over and insure the continuance 
of the highly successful Tv Commercials Festival. 

New projects to be announced 

\- we Bee it. sponsor's role in industry affairs is to give 
rapport and help to worthwhile projects on every front. Thus, 
a few years ago we campaigned for an RAB and a TvB. 
Thus we are now engaged in a drive to standardize and 
simplify radio/tv -pot buying. 

Within a few week- we -hall announce significant new 
projects which will be sponsor backed. Watch for them. 



fa 



this we fight for: Unceasing creativity 
in tackling the problems which face the indus- 
try — a never-ending search for better wars of 
haying, spiling and programing radio and tv. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Moved: George Mathiesen, generj 
manager of KYW-TV, Cleveland, serl 
a letter to a party in Wooster, Ohial 
received it back several days latel 
with this notation written across thg 
envelope by the Wooster postmaste 
— ' 'Deceased — left no forwarding o 
dress." 

The truth: An inferiority complex! 
could be a good thing — if the right! 
persons had it. — Pat Buttram, CBS.J j 

Tv note: A fragment of dialogue be-j 
tween two men hurrying along Fifth:! 
Avenue one spring day recently hasl 
been reported to us. "The television 
drama I'm waiting for," one 
said desperately, "is the night thai 
the decay germs rally and beat thJ 
toothpaste. What a hell of a shovf 
that will be." — Caskie Stinnett 
"Speaking of Holiday." 

Pre-empt: A Cuban tv performer,! 
discouraged at his show's pre-emptioni 
by one of Fidel Castro's telethons,! 
said, "What can you do when they! 
consider the pre-emption an act of 
God?"— TV Guide. 



Tooth for a tooth: Memo on a pro 
gram change in movies from WSJV- 
TV, South Bend-Elkhart— "On Fri- 
day, July 29th . . . Please cancel The 
Monkey's Paw. Insert The Panther's 
Claw." 

Tv cure: The curious thing about the 
sick comedians is that they all seem 
to be getting along so well. — Will 
Conway. 

Ammo: Now that June is over, here's 

a tardy breakdown on what to throw 

at the happy couple depending on 

where the marriage took place — 

Main St., U.S.A.— Rice. 

Beatnik Greenwich Village — Wild 

rice. 

Hollywood — Minute rice. 

Climber: The agency media director 
called the young timebuyer in on the 
carpet. "You've been going over my 
head again, haven't you?" he said. 

"I d-d-don't know what you mean, 
sir," stammered the timebuyer. 

"Isn't it true," roared the media 
director, "that you've been praving 
for a raise?" 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1960 




FRONT LINE 

of the WSB-TV news team 



Poised here before White Columns are the 
men and mobile units that provide viewers 
with the most complete local and regional 
television news coverage in Georgia. 

Cars shown are equipped with 2-way 
short-wave, mobile telephones, police radio. 
Complete mobile unit is pictured right. A 
helicopter is on call. Magnetic sound cam- 
eras are used. 

When an alleged attempt was made to 
bribe a Fulton County grand jury foreman, 
a concealed WSB-TV cameraman filmed the 
actual passing of money. For this filmed 
story WSB-TV has just received the Asso- 
ciated Press' highest news award for Geor- 
gia in 1959 — "Superior" in general news. 



This station also was awarded the AP 
"Superior" for news features — the staff- 
produced "One in a Million" that document- 
ed Atlanta's reaching a million population 
being the winner. 

With seven local newscasts daily, in ad- 
dition to regular network news, WSB-TV 
is THE news station of Georgia. Audience 
ratings are consistently higher than for any 
other Atlanta tv outlet. 

ATLANTA'S 

WSB-TV 

CHANNEL 2 



Mated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution. NBC affiliate. Represented by Petry. Associated with WSOC/WSOC-TV, Charlotte; WHIO/WHIO-TV, Dayton. 







SUMMER 
PROGRAMMING 

^3 I ■ I— ^— L^ Summer campaigns zoom to peak-season results on 

B ^\ D WPRO-TV, CBS for Southern New England, 

— ^ ■ iRflBfl ^— America's first vacationland. Cape Cod, Newport, Martha's 

^^^^ ■*■■"■ ^™ ■ Vineyard, Nantucket and other summer colonies more than double 

^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ 1 1^1 ^j J the viewer size of America's twelfth largest market. 

WPRO-TV programs and promotes for peak-season results all summer long. 
First run feature films ... 12 personalities with daily shows . . . Red Sox baseball . . . 
CBS summer specials including the Olympics and Nominating Conventions swell 
WPRO-TV's great summer audience of buyers. 
Call Gene Wilkin in Providence at Plantations 1-9776 or Contact Blair TV. 



J 



WPRO-TV Providence 



18 JULY I960 
40< ■ copy* $8 a year 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



DO YOU 

BWUMe 

iSJtoMDMO or HoUstD]^? 



Then, for Heaven's sake, check your latest Hooperating. 
u'll be amazed to see how KTSA has clobbered the San Antonio opposition. 

And in Houston, Hooper now shows KILT nearly DOUBLE its 
nearest competition. Ask John Blair for the latest figures! 

:he McLENDON Stations: 



YSL 

uffalo 



WAKY 
Louisville 



KTSA 

San Antonio 



KILT 

Houston 



KABL 
San Francisco 



KLIF 

Dallas 



KEEL 

Shreveport 



HOW CLIENTS 
SOLD ON TV 
AT CONVENTION 

A set-side report on 
tv commercials from 
Los Angeles and how 
11 web sponsors fared 

Page 29 



Radio at L.A.: 

Mermen's 
big switch 

Page 32 

The high cost 
of agency 
tv departments 

Page 36 



Trend in tv 
commercials: 
the soft sell 

Page 40 






QUALITY 



TOUCH 



. 



Faster and faster the potter's wheel 
spins . . . from a mere mound of clay 
there suddenly arises a cherished piece 
of pottery— a visible reflection of 
one who possesses a quality touch. 

Oftentimes this all-important quality 
reflection is not visible. Nevertheless, 
it is there ... to be sensed and valued. 
Such is the case when quality enters 
the operational scene in today's better 
radio and television station operations. 




099 



TELEVISION oTT 
RADIO abc/nbc • DALLAS 

Serving the greater DALLAS-FORT WORT" ~a-*et 
BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 




SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



NASHVILLE'S 

WSIX-TV 

Now offers 

Quality...with NEWEST 

VIDEOTAPE* 



ltd™ „#•' 

IB r 



the fastest way to sell 
the Central South 



Simplified, economical production . . . the 
quickest way to get your sales message 
across. In Tennessee WSIX TV offers you 
the latest model VIDEOTAPE* television — 
improved circuitry insures brilliant repro- 
duction. Complete facilities for both re- 
cording and playback ... or send us any 
tape that's been recorded on an Ampex 
VR-1000 for immediate scheduling. 



T\ /* 




© Vol. 14, No. 29 • 18 JULY I960 



mm sponsor 

I THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

The Democratic Convention ad picture 

29 Tv's convention sales pitches. Here's a report on the commerce 
techniques used by 11 tv net sponsors, and how they came over ai 

32 Mennen's switch to radio: Among the four national clients 

bought coverage on net radio, Mennen was the most significan 

Coty's new tv and print parlay 

3 4- Cosmetic firm gives key role to color print in launching four ne\i 
lipstick shades, but uses television for reach and to build traffic 

The high cost of agency tv talent 

36 This is why admen clamor for high-priced tv execs even though 90^o 
of programs are controlled by nets and suppliers, not ad agencies 

Tv station teams weather, 20-second spot 

39 Birmingham. Ala. station pitched 30-second stationbreaks (10-second 
weather report and 20-second spot) ; landed beer advertiser in no timi 

Film and tape marriage solves a problem 

39 Late season ad rush for boat maker who wanted outdoor shots resulted 
in speedy tv commercials through converting film to tape in a hurrv 



Tv commercials trend: the softer sell 

40 Analysis of winners in American Commercials Festival shows 43% relied 
importantly on humor. About half used music to bolster the sales pitch 



FEATURES 

12 Commercial Commentary 

56 Film-Scope 

26 49th and Madison 

60 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

60 Picture Wrap-Up 

44 Radio Basics 

24 Reps at Work 

68 Seller's Viewpoint 



48 Sponsor Asks 

58 Sponsor Hears 

19 Sponsor-Scope 

70 Sponsor Speaks 

46 Spot Buys 

52 Telepulse 

70 Ten-Second Spots 

67 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

55 Washington Week 



s=sa 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC combined with TV Executive, Editorial, Circulation 
Advertising Offices: 40 E 49th St (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUi 
Hill 8 277? Chicago Ot'.ce 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863 Birminr* 
Office: 3617 8th Ave. South Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Ef " 
Md. Subscriptions: U S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphi 
vear Other Foreign countries $11 per 
all correspondence 
by SPONSOR Publi 



___„j Countries $9 
.... Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Addu 
i 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17. N Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published w«ekl> 
s postage paid 



• Baltimore, Md 



f I960 Sponsor Publications In 



18 july 1960 



H.R 



3X2 



N.P 



2X3 



BOUNDERS 

IN 
SACK SUITS 



It's station rep day at the Annual Time Buyers Outing. By a series of 
eliminations, our man from H-R and another from Nameless Reps, Inc., 
have achieved the finals of the sack race (not to be confused with Bag 
Holding, which is another puzzle entirely). They are to race to a point 
one hundred feet distant, and return. 

Clockers have 'em cased, from preliminary heats, as a 3x2 one-gaiter up 
against a 2x3 one-gaiter. (One covers three feet per bound and makes 
two bounds while the other, covering two feet per bound, makes three 
bounds. Neither can change his length of bound.) Both are adroit enough 
to negotiate the turn without loss of time. 

The prize, twelve unbreakable appointments with twelve time buyers of 
twelve agencies of his choice, is won by the H-R man. Was he the 3x2er 
or the 2x3er? 

You too can be a winner. Each correct solution wins a fresh copy of Dudeney's 
"Amusements in Mathematics," published by Dover Publications, Inc., N. Y. C. 



wmal-tv 

Channel 7, Washington, D. C. 
An Evening Star Station, represented by H-R Television, Inc. 

Affiliated with WMAL and WMAL-FM, Washington, D.C.; WSVA-TV and WSVA, Harrisonburg, Va. 
PONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 




KEEP 
SEARCHING 
WHEN . . . 



WALB-TV 



CH. 10 — ALBANY, GA. 

fl the only primary 

NBC outlet between 

Atlanta and the Gulf . . . 

in a $740 million market! 

Represented nationally by 
Vcnord, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 
In the South by James S. Ayers Co. 



NEWSMAKEI 
of the week 



Today. 39-year-old Ted Bergmann — a 13-year pioneer 
television advertising — joins Revlon, Inc., as vice president 
in charge of that company's giant advertising program in frl 
radio, magazines and neicspapers, after being president o\ 
the Parkson agency, JSew York. The move portends even 
greater tv stress for the cosmetics and the other divisions, 

The newsmaker: After a week's vacation between jobs < 
West Hampton, a posh resort area near his Manhasset home on Loai 
Island, Theodore G. Bergmann is launching into his new post 
Revlon with a verve which matches that of his energetic employers 

His plans as advertising v. p.? "It would be presumptuous, at thii 
point, to discuss them. But tv has played and will continue to play ar 
extremely important part in Revlon's future. It is easily the i 
influential of all media." His tv 
experience, of course, was a major 
determinant in the thinking of Rev- 
lon President Charles Revson. 

Bergmann joined WABD, New- 
York, the DuMont key station, as 
a salesman in 1947; worked up to 
become managing director of the 
DuMont network and its three 
o&o stations. 

But hes an all-around ad spe- 
cialist as well as a tv pro, having 
been v. p. and member of the mar- 
keting plans board at McCann- 
Erickson. He's been president of Parkson since 195/. 

There he gained toiletry and cosmetics experience (Pharmaceuti 
cals, J. B. Williams), with 90% of the billings in net tv. One of hii 
successes: Twenty One, the Pharmaceuticals show which matched 
the success of Revlon's $64,000 Challenge and Question programs. 

Mr. Bergmann's appraisal of tv today seems to point toward exj 
elusive program sponsorship for Revlon. He has "lots of ideas abouj 
what's going on in tv today," and he "deplores the magazine concept 
or spot carrier concept that is almost blanketing the medium. Thev 
remove from the advertiser the valuable basic pluses over and abo 
the inherent selling abilitv of the medium. A lot of spots in a lot o I 
different shows lose the most potent factor — the image-making 
gratitude factor — identification of the product or the company nam<! 
with the program property. The more the industry goes in this direc- 
tion, the less effective the broadcaster makes the medium.' 

Mr. l)crgmann is active in industry as well as civic affairs. A past 
board member of the NAB. he's now on the boards of the Radio-Tv 
Executives Society and the Academy of Tv Arts and Sciences. 




Theodore G. Bergmai 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 196(1 




dDnmEBEB 



Egypt, Caesar went to Syria and Pontus, and in quick order, routed Pharnaces II, sending back his 
famous message. Balaban Stations haven't taken to wearing the victor's laurel wreath around their 
I but it's a fact Balaban advertisers are conquering their markets. Balaban directs their messages, 
aesar's, straight to the point ... the selling point. Balaban programming, stimulating personalities and 
D-and-go appeal gets listeners and keeps listeners - keeps 'em listening and keeps 'em buying! Let 
alaban Stations carry your message, straight to the buyer. Balaban Stations - couriers par excellence! 



IE BALABAN STATIONS 



in tempo with the times • John F. Box, Jr., Managing Director 



L-ST. LOUIS WRIT-MILWAUKEE / KBOX-DALLAS 









HI 




i 


™ ?* 


1 H~ 


,^ffiE£8 




[1 




1 




Largest share: 

WNBQ wins Chicago's 
biggest nighttime 
audience share— 
an average of 31.7% 
per quarter-hour, 
6 pm to midnight, 
Monday through Friday. 
Most adults: 
And it's the audience 
you want most to 
talk to— 88% adult! 
Biggest buying power: 
The biggest share 
of audience and 
the most adults among 
all Chicago stations, 
means the greatest 
purchasing power. 
For the power to 
sell in Chicago, use... 



NBC Owned • Channel 5 in Chicago 
Sold by NBC Spot Sales £B 



Source: NSI May 1960 & NSI April-May 1960 



<x Signal HOMOR ... 



\7Xe f960 
> Ur,/ //,//. s/«<u</ 

MDI TV GOUTY N0ADCAS1K COMPANY 







The Michigan Education Association, at their 1960 representa- 
tive assembly, cited WNEM-TV "FOR DISTINGUISHED INTER- 
PRETATION AND COVERAGE OF EDUCATION THROUGH 
NEWS REPORTS, FILMED SERIES, LIVE PUBLIC SERVICE PRO- 
GRAMMING AND NATIONAL NETWORK PRESENTATIONS 
DURING 1959." 

ektMl 5 WNEM-TV 

tkfiiiiiVi/Mimb&m 
wtotikAWARDJ 

. . . another in a long line of distinguished 
awards and honors bestowed upon WNEM-TV, 
Eastern Michigan's FIRST VHF STATION. 



"This 1959 School Bell Award was received 
with deep gratitude and appreciation. Please 
join me in sharing this signal honor, and rest 
assured that WNEM-TV will always strive to 
measure up to its responsibilities to our many 
associates." 

Most Sincerely, 

James Gerity, Jr., 

President 

Gerity Broadcasting Corp. 





WNEM-TV 

serving 
FLINT • SAGINAW • BAY CITY 

099 ^ (gi) 



SPONSOR 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 
News Editor 
Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor 
Alfred J. Joffe 
Senior Editor 
Jane Pinkerton 



Film Editor; 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Jack Lindrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 
Ben Seff 
Lloyd Kaplan 
Walter F. Scanlon 
Michael Silver 



Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 
Production Editor 

Lee St. John 
Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 
Editorial Research 

Helene Etelson 
Barbara Parkinson 



ADVERTISING D 
Sales Manager 

Arthur E. Breider 
Eastern Office 

Willard Dougherty 



Western Manager 

George Dietrich 
Production 

Phyllis Waldbrand 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

L. C. Windsor, Manager 
Virginia Markey 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Massimino, Assistant to Publisher 
Laura O. Paperman, Accounting Manager 
George Becker; Anne Marie Cooper; 
Michael Crocco; Syd Guttman; Wilke 
Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Dorothy Tinker; 
Flora Tomadelli 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



Hard-boiled rating service 

Let's face it: The toughest rating service news for five years without an interrup- 

of all is determined by the sponsor's pen; .. .— ^ tion. Sealy Mattress has sponsored the 
he either signs a renewal or he doesn't. '^^ 11:10 P.M. weather show for eight years. 

And, by this standard especially, we shine ^ Ratings like these from top national ad- 

with a gem-like brilliance. For example, ^^ vertisers pay off — for our clients and for 
Esso Standard has sponsored our 11 P.M. ^ b ^ us — against any competition. 



WJAR-TV 

CHANNEL 10, 

PROVIDENCE, R.I. 



'ONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



Concentrate in 

JACKSON, 
MISS. 



Did you know? 

Over 233,000 
TV Homes 

• • • 

A Billion Dollars 
in Retail Sales 

• • • 

All in the 

JACKSON 

TV Market 

Area 



WJTV 

CHANNEL 12 

KATZ 



WLBT 

CHANNEL 3 

HOLUNGBERY 



by John E. McMillin 



'1 



Commercial 
commentary 



\ 




Hey, getcha co' beer 

"Holj cow!" shouted Phil Rizzuto. Roger 
Maris had uncoiled that cream-smooth -wing 
and the ball was going, going, gone on a flat 
trajectory into the upper right field stands of 
Yankee Stadium. 

"Holj cow!" said Rizzuto again. "*>a\ . did 
you see that?" And suddenly, as Phil burbled 
on and Maris went tearing around the bases in a 
burst of triumphant modesty. I got to thinking about my father 
Ralph E. McMillin who. 47 years ago this summer, was sports editoi 
of the Boston Herald. 

Sitting in the pressbox high above Fenway Park he pounded out 
back there in 1913, exactly the same kind of tribute: 

"Zowie! Police! Say, did he hit that ball? 

Well take it from me he did: 

He's the guy nith the eye that they never get by. 

The little oF murderin kid." 

That's the kind of language I was weaned on. And I know 1 
have a built-in family prejudice in favor of baseball and the work 
of such ace sportcasters as Rizzuto, Mel Allen, and Red Barber. 

But even admitting this inherited bias, Td like to suggest that the 
season-long telecasts of the Yankee games are the greatest single 
tv treat we have in the New York area, and an almost perfect ex- 
ample of enlightened tv sponsorship. 

If there are other advertisers in America who are doing a better 
selling job in a friendlier way than Winston, Camel, and especially 
Ballantine beer, I'd like to know who they are. 

Li-ve-ly golden, erys-tal-ly clear 

For the R. J. Reynolds brands, of course, the commercials on the 
Yankees' home-and-away games represent a relatively minor part of 
huge, vear-round advertising campaigns. And. as I've said before. 
Winston I and Camel too) always sell good, like a cigarette should. 

But the Ballantine effort seems to me even more remarkable. For 
the Newark firm is competing in one of the country's best advertised 
industries and is batting close to 1,000 in a very tough league. 

According to the judges in the First American Tv Commercials 
Festival last May. three different product categories lead all others 
in toda\'s creative selling. 

We found more top commercials for autos, prepared food mixes 
and beers than for any other classifications. 

And of these groups, beer is certainly the most surprising. 

With automobiles, there are dozens of style, model, and accessory 
features that can be shown photogenically in a tv spot. 

With prepared food mixes (cakes, muffins, instant potatoes, in- 
stant onions, instant coffees, etc.), there are strong elements of nov- 
i Please turn to page 14 i 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



: 



"THE JIM BACKUS SHOW 
-HOT OFF THE WIRE" 



Wire press service -or madhouse? 

No one knows for sure. But this is certain. 
"The Jim Backus Show-Hot Off The Wire" 
will be one of the funniest, zaniest shows 
ever seen on television. 
Jim Backus plays John Michael O'Toole, last 
of the free-wheeling journalists. As sole pro- 
prietor and editor of Worldwide Press Serv- 
ice, O'Toole lives only to "scoop" the major 



press associations. And that's the root of the 
fun in this new comedy series. 
Supporting cast includes Nita Talbot, who 
has a long string of Broadway, television 
and movie credits. She aids and abets the 
high-jinks as O'Toole's Girl Friday. Ray 
Singer and Dick Chevillat, who have written 
for most of television's top comedy series are 
producing "The Jim Backus Show." 



CNP 




FOREIGN NEWS ANALYST - 
O'Toole stays abreast of the news 
from the four corners of the globe 
. . . via radio. But John Michael 
O'Toole will start a war if neces- 
sary to create a front page story. 



FASHION EDITOR - O'Toole 
doesn't know a peignoir from a pen- 
guin. But if he needs fashion news 
he'll get it. If necessary, his men 
an "exclusive," then go 
nake the news happen. 



SPORTS EDITOR- Toole 
makes it a habit to get all the sports 
news first-hand . . . from bookies, 
and tipsters. Actually, O'Toole's 
favorite sport is scooping the ma- 
jor press associations on hot news. 



YOU 
KCAN'T 
KCOVER 

TEXAS 

without 

KCEN-TV 




5 & 10! 

our plans for top rated 
spots in class B, C and D 
time deliver viewers at 
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m i 

CHANNEL C£?< 




CEN-TV 



- 



Commercial commentary {Com. from p. 12I 



eltj and how-to instructions thai make the t\ job comparative!; 

Bui beer is a product that causes cop) writer:- to cringe. 

The differences between beers are non-demonstrable i at least on 

I In- sales arguments and copj platforms permissable in a beer 

campaign are as ephemeral as the foam on a Third Avenue stein. 

Yel somehow, l>\ some creative miracle, we have more fine beer 
advertising Budweiser, Schlitz, Coor's, Piel's. Carling, Stroh's. Busch 
Bavarian, Schaeffer and many many others — than we have for almost] 
anj single product you can name. 

\u<\ for all-round advertising excellence — for its program gift of 
Yankee baseball and its "li-ve-ly golden, crys-tal-ly clear" commer- 
cials. m\ own vote goes to the Ballantine campaign. 

The sale with brewer's gold 

Baseball and Ballantine are now in their 14th year in New York 
and let no one underestimate the value of this long association. 

Charles Liebman. president of Liebman Breweries, and the origi- 
nator of the "Miss Rheingold" contests, once told me this about beer 
advertising, "W ith a frequent-purchase item that has no novelty fea- 
tures you can't hope to get by with straight, hard-sell product an- 
nouncements. You've got to give people something — entertainment 
or programing." 

Ballantine. with its superlatively handled Yankee broadcasts, has 
1" u giving the public something very special. And undoubtedly 
it lias been cashing in on what Leo Burnett calls the '"glacial power 
of friendly familiarity." 

But it would be a mistake to think that mere gratitude for the tele- 
vised exploits of Mssrs. Mantle, Maris, Berra, Ford, and Stengel has 
made Ballantine the '"largest selling beer in the East." 

Equally important and much more significant to advertising men 
is the masterful way in which Ballantine, with its agency William 
Esty, has built up its structures of tv commercial selling. 

One of the keynotes of the Ballantine approach is variety, or as 
they call it, '"freshness of exposure"' — a mercifully pleasant change 
of pace and treatment which keeps a viewer from getting bored, ir- 
ritated, and sore, as you do with the pounding copy repetitions. 

For its baseball broadcasts Ballantine uses nine different types of 
commercials, over 30 different announcements in a season. 

They range from the gay and humorous "Three Ring Pete" car- 
toons down to straight live sales pitches delivered by Mel Allen. 
The) include two different puppet campaigns, a "Lighter Side of 
Sports" series, a '"Paul Hahn." a "'Peter Crisp"' series, and numerous 
-till life product treatments. And new commercials for each series 
are being fed into the Ballantine pool every month. 

Holding them all firmly together are the well-known Ballantine 
trade marks, the "Three Ring Sign.*' the '"Hey. getcha co' beer" call. 
and the bouncy "ic-e-l) light, pre-ci-se-ly right*" jingle. 

There's no mistaking the copy and sales points which Ballantine 
is making. Like all smart advertisers, they concentrate on a few 
simple sales themes, and stay on target. 

But within the framework of a carefully planned copy approach. 
thej show a bright gay friendly creativity and originality which any 
adman could be proud of. 

This is my idea of sound, enlightened advertising practice. To 
borrow Ballantine slogan, it's a "sale with Brewers Gold." ^ 






SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



QUALITY TELEVISION 



RICH, RICH 

SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND 




TY IN THE GUNSMITHS CRAFT IS REPRESENTED BY THESE 



COLTS OF HARTFORD, A PROUD NAME SINCE 1836. 



RICH, RICH SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND. QUALITY IN TELEVISION IS THE HALLMARK OF WTIC-TV. 
H YES. WTIC-TV PROGRAMS ARE HIGHEST RATED TOO. 



WW JL X V/ ^^^ "^ » ^^ HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 

*ASK YOUR HARRINGTON, RIGHTER & PARSONS MAN 



how does a tattoo 




f 



V 



M'f} 



Kt^ 



L>4 

v'l 



Two ways. 



>ncern you ? 



h 



) 



First — it's a perfect illustration of what 
a great campaign can do. Second — it 
proves that the advertiser who believes in 
advertising ends up a power in his industry. 

So — how does this concern a broadcaster? 

So — it works the same way here. 

Every station that sells advertising — and 
has equal faith in buying it as well — 
always winds up with a bigger share 
of spot in its market. 

Think it over. 

And don't eliminate the "tattoo". 

We respectfully suggest you find the 
"tattoo" that suits your station image 
best — then call SPONSOR. 

SPONSOR reaches practically everyone 
involved in the purchase of time — of course. 
But there's a special segment it reaches 
best. We call it "the influential 2000" 
because this "influential 2000" actually 
purchases better than 95% of all national 
radio and TV spot. SPONSOR has a greater 
penetration of influence within this group 
than any other book in the broadcast field. 

That's our sales "tattoo" — substantiated by 
every independent survey made. 




SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 

40 East 49th St. MU 8-2772 New York 17 



Everywhere people are saying 



Lancaster-Harrisburg-York\ 

TV market when J 
WGAL-TV 




MULTI-CITY TV MARKET 




Representative: The MEEKER Company, Inc. New York 



WCAL-TV 

is favored by viewers in Lancaster-Harrisburg-York, 
plus Gettysburg, Hanover, Lebanon, Chambersburg, 
Lewistown, Carlisle, Shamokin, Waynesboro, and many 
other communities. Profit-proved for advertisers, this 
multi-city market is important to your selling plans. 



WGAL-TV 

Lancaster, Pa. 

NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 

Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 




Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR- SCOPE 



18 JULY I960 

Cwyrlfht l»80 

SPONSOR 

UBLIOATIONS INC. 



There's lots of open time right now but tv stations, especially in the major mar- 
kets, appear to be holding firm to the 30-day confirmation rule for fall business. 

In other words, all that national spot accounts with September or early October starting 
dates are getting are tentative acceptances — for what they're worth — and assurances they'll 
be hearing of confirmations around 15 August. 

Among the major accounts in the market for early fall start is Vick's. Morse's media 
director, Orrin Christy, Jr., who's been on the road talking to stations about Vick 
schedules, admitted this week that he's been finding it tough to get confirmations. 

What this tightening of the 30-day confirmation bit may indicate is that the stations an- 
ticipate the tightest market for spots in several years. Particularly in view r of the fact 
there'll be heaps of election money starting early September. 



A. C. Nielsen will be playing two sides of the media street soon. 

It's planning to launch a syndicated service which will produce what it terms a cross- 
media analysis of tv and magazine audiences. 

On the magazine side it will deal with total readership, unduplicated readership and 
various market and home characteristics. It will also deliver tabs showing what the au- 
dience would be in certain variations of exclusively magazine or inter magazine-tv 
mixes. Subscription fee being asked of the big agencies: §12,000 a year. 

Know what a large percentage of calls reps have been getting lately from their 
radio stations pertain to? 

It's this: what should they do about accepting at the local rate a schedule on a national 
product which was being offered them through, as it might be, a distributor, jobber or 
somebody traveling for a national advertiser or agency? 

Obvious reason for the phone call flurry : that tee-off to reps by Ayer's Leslie Far- 
nath about seeing that the stations gave all national products equal rate treatment. 

The key response of the reps to those calls : it depends on how hungry the other sta- 
tions in the market are for business; if too hungrv, you'd better snap it up. 

Don't be surprised if for the first six months of this year national spot tv 
shows a higher gross than network tv in gross time sales. 

At the rate they're going spot should edge through with at least §10 million bet- 
ter than network. 

Of course, there's no comparing the actual expenditures made in the two media. First. 
the ratio spent on talent in network is many times that of spot; secondly, there's a big 
difference in discounts prevailing in spot. 

B&Ws latest progeny, Kentucky Kings, is on the prowl for nighttime tv ID's 
via Bates, with September as the starting time. 

Among the other spot tv quests for the past week: P&G's Lilt (Grey), nighttime min- 
utes; Revlon's High & Dry (Grey) day and night minutes, starting the end of July and 
running six-eight weeks at the rate of five-10 a week. 

Talk about innovations in supermarkets, one has just opened in Rockland. Mass.. 
that offers wall-to-wall carpeting. 

The carpeting, however, is limited to the gourmet department. 



• 18 JULY 1960 



19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

l'rimr-time shows principally appealing lo kids appear to have become a dn 
on the market for the tv networks. 

Note in this regard that such hard names as Disney, Shirley Temple and Bugs Bu 
n\ still are unsold. 

What the networks, as the trade sees it, are up against: 

1) The base for the kid-seeking type of advertiser with the kind of mom 
that network requires is pretty narrow. 

2) Rating obtainable in prime time may be good but the cost-per-1000 for 
kid potential is far out of line with what can be had from buying into kid shows sel 
tivel) . 



Meanwhile, though, the demand for spot availabilities in and around kid shows hal 
begun to run so high that reps expect tv stations to create new repositories faj 
such business. 

This would be mainly to take care of the pre-Christmas trade. 
The added programing: 5-5:30 Saturdays and Sundays. 

International Latex is scouting around for a film barter deal with which to rtt 
place the one it made in July 1956 with C&C Tv Corp. involving the RKO librar; 

Some of those C&C contracts are expiring this year, while others have until July 1 
to go. 

Reported last week: Latex was in process of negotiating a barter proposition th 
entailed around $4 million. 

Worth noting is the latest premium twist in the cereal field: a story book whicl 

starts around the sides of the box and continues in a folder encased in the package 

Innovator: General Mills' Twinkles. 

In other words, now that the boxtop giveaway by agreement of the manufacturers i 
out, the trend is to develop cartoon-story characters stemming from the brand itself] 

Chalk up DuPont as one of the most shrewdly and successfully nursed account! 
in the highways and byways of tv by an agency. 

Within the space of a few years BBDO has maneuvered this chemical giant inti 
the position where its expenditures for tv are not far from $12 million a year, 

Its network commitments alone are now about $11.5 million, what with the Show o 
the Month, the June Allyson show and its 48 commercial minutes to be devoted thi 
fall-winter for the promotion of the anti-freeze and auto-cleanser lines. 

There are also the periodic spot campaigns for the textile division. 

The watch industry isn't giving network tv the money play it did the 1959 fall 
conspicuously among the missing will be Bulova. 

For the Christmas buying season last year Bulova spent about $2.6 million for an al 
ternate week show and fourth quarter participations in Today. 

Here's what the timepiece industry's commitment picture in network tv looks like tin 
1960-61 season: 

COMPANY VEHICLES TIME-TALENT COSTS 

Westclox Regular series $2,700,000 

U.S. Time (Timex) Specials 1,250,000 

Elgin Participation, special 850,000 

Longine Wittnauer Specials 550.000 

Benrus Special 300,000 

Total $5,450,000 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE « 



There's no question now about the spread of the alternate half-hour and par- 
ticipations taking their heavy toll on the singly sponsored program. 

The number of regularly sponsored nighttime tv network programs with but 
one advertiser will be down to an all-time low of 25 come the fall. And that against 
an all-time high of 109 commercial prime-timers. 

A comparison of the singly sponsored program tallies over the past three falls: 
network 1960 1959 1958 

ABC TV 7 10 8 

CBS TV 9 17 13 

NBC TV 9 9 11 

Total 25 36 32 



CBS TV's daytime sector proudly pointed out last week that in face of stiff 
price competition it's just garnered a mess of business. 

Cited as cases in point: R. T. French, two quarter-hours a week and additional quar- 
ter-hours from Armstrong, J. B. Williams, Corn Products and Lever (Lipton's Tea). 



For an interesting contrast of what they're asking these days at the tv networks for com- 
mercial minutes on untried nighttime programs: 

Aquanauts (CBS), $18,000; Hong Kong (ABC), $28,000 and the Western 
(NBC), $21,000. 

Daytime network tv billings fell off another notch in May. 

How the gross billings stacked up by network for that month and the first four months of 
1960, as reported by LNA-BAR via TvB: 



NETWORK 


MAY 1960 


MARGIN VS. 1959 


JAN.-MAY 


MARGIN VS. 195 


ABC TV 


$2,833,000 


+43.2% 


$14,773,000 


+9.5 r /< 


CBS TV 


7,174,000 


- 5.3% 


38,105,000 


-4.3$ 


NBC TV 


5,823,000 


-i3.9 r ; 


31,588,000 


-6.6% 


Total 


$15,830,000 


- 3.8% 


$84,466,000 


-3.0% 



What agency research people deem the most significant innovation in daytime 
network tv : the flexibility of the commercial announcement scattering operation. 

The core of their observation: this technique of hitting all points of the week's 
schedule via minutes and crossplugs is something the multi-product advertiser has 
always wanted and not found available. 

A curious angle of this concept: the ability to achieve a high level of reach and fre- 
quency is such as to possibly preclude the advertiser from appearing on the anchor 
show. 

Even for the small advertiser, say the researchers, it's been a tremendous novelty. 

(For what new use techniques portent for daytime tv see 4 July sponsor, page 29.) 



Raymond Spector has the Hazel Bishop account back on his hands: Donahue 
& Coe quietly resigned it after less than five months. 

The cosmetic's last involvement with air media was in a couple things on CBS TV. 



sponsor • 18 july 1960 



SPONSOR-SCOPE ci 



Cynosure of the giant agencies is Ogilvy, Benson & Mather and their particu- 
lar point of interest is this: how deft will OBM he in digesting the mammoth Shell 
(Ml account with all its complex local factors? 

Media-wise Shell's predominantly local and OBM starts off faced with a mountain 
of paperwork, that is. renegotiating time, program and space commitments. 

It also happens to be one of those accounts where the regional and district people 
exercise heavy control over planning, budgets and media strategy. 

OBM hasn't indicated whether it'll absorb some of the people who serviced the 
account at JWT, nor was it ready last week to tell how it will staff up to handle the 
account. 

Incidentally, it took McCann-Erickson two years to digest the Coca-Cola account. 

Just to bring you up-to-date on some of the latest factual facets of tv: 

• The average home watches tv 45 hours a week, which is better than the time de- 
voted to the normal 40-hour work week. 

• Evening watching per week averages 24 hours per home — only a minute less than 
the peak year of 1958. 

• The morning average is 6 hours and 16 minutes a week and in the afternoon 
it's 10 hours and 33 minutes. 

(For the latest statistics on this medium and radio see Air Media Basics, scheduled for 
inclusion with the 1 August SPONSOR.) 

Spot tv's new business developers aren't calling quits just because the Detroit 
automotive* have gone high-wide-and-handsome for network tv this fall. 

Carriers of the spot message for at least two of the major reps last week made 
the rounds of the GM agencies, filling them in on the latest facts and arguments. 

Admitted the missionaries: we've still got a hard row to hoe before Detroit becomes 
aware of the right media balance and mix in these 1960's. 

Don't think though that these sales development people in tv rep firms aren't 
doing something resourceful about getting a bigger share of automotive money 
this fall. 

Several have already lined up dates for early July at which they'll pitch something 
different in getting maximum mileage out of spot via actual local devices. 

One of them has a local personality angle which he figures will appeal strongly to 
the smaller companies because it will have the effect of "making $3,000 look like 
$6,000." 

Fearsome that the thing might be symptomatic, JWT's making a strenuous ef- 
fort to dissuade WJAR-TV, Providence, (a two-station market) from putting the 
Tennessee Ernie Show (Ford) on delay and replacing it with the Untouchables 
live this fall. 

W.I \R-TV's supposed reason: Groucho Marx who follows Ernie is unsponsored. 
JWT may raise this point: can NBC be considered as having a valid contract for the 
Ernie Ford Show if it can't deliver the stations live the program's been accustomed to. 

Bates reports that Continental Baking, which spent around $7 million for spot tv 
in 1959. has no plans for the fall firmed up. 

However, there have been signs that it's thinking of announcements. Also, nothing is 
expected to come out of that query it made about local events programing. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spol Buys, page 46; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 55; sponsor 
Hears, page 58; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 67; and Film-Scope, page 56. 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 




fl* the ^W oj JIMI2 and y^oneyf 



GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN 



YDN R. EVANS. G 



E KATZ AGENCY 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



BRAND NEW: 

Out of the thousands of 

SATURDAY EVENING POST 

stones read and loved by millions 

ericans ITC now proudly 

brings to television first run, 

for the first time, the 







Pulitzer Prize-winning 
authors like MacKinlay Kantor, 
Conrad Richter, Stephen Vincent 
Benet . . . and many others. 



S£ 



INDEPENDENT 

^) TELEVISION 

CORPORATION 



- 



Reps at work 




N. Y. 22 . PL 5-2100 



Tom Carroll, v. p.. Radio-Tv Representatives. New York, laments 
the "negative selling'" he sees practiced by many spot radio sales- 
men. "By negative selling I mean attacking the competition in the 
market. Usually this is done in the mistaken belief that the salesman 
then enhances his own chance of selling his properties. This type of 
selling does no good for anyone. 
Actually it seriously undermines 
the whole concept of spot radio as 
a top flight sales tool, and leads 
to confusion in the mind of the 
timebuyer. I have actually heard 
buyers sav after listening to vari- 
ous reps knocking each other's sta- 
tions that they wonder if they 
should recommend spot radio at 
all. At Radio-Tv Reps salesmen 
are instructed to sell positively on 
each of the stations in our markets. 
\^ e sell our radio stations and couldn't care less about the com- 
petition. We prefer not even to mention any other station's call 
letters. If each rep concentrates on doing a creative selling job for 
his own stations, the buyer can decide by comparing the strong 
features instead of weaknesses. Lets keep competition constructive." 



Ed Dillon, Television Advertising Representatives. Inc.. New York, 
urges reps to tie their presentations of spot television to the client's 
specific problems in dealing with agencies and advertisers. "The 
upcoming fall and winter may well be the biggest spot season in the 
historj of television, but it wont happen automatically. Record ex- 
penditures for spot tv must come 
not only from current users, but 
from non-users and light users. 
who — I believe — have shown an 
increasing interest in the medium 
and a growing awareness of its 
selling power." In working with 
advertisers Ed believes that a rep 
must be careful to base his presen- 
tation on a knowledge of the entire 
product category as well as the ad- 
vertiser's specific marketing needs. 
"Station men ought to be doing the 
same in their market. We must intensify our two-pronged effort, both 
nationallv and locally, to convert more non-users and light users to 
regular customers for spot. While reps work at the national level, 
-tations should educate the local broker. The best way to get maxi- 
mum market support is by teamwork between rep and station. 



- 




SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



J 

WHETHE 

YOU WEATHER THE STORM IN AMERICA'S LARGEST AND 
MOST COMPETITIVE MARKET DEPENDS TO A LARGE 
EXTENT ON HOW WELL YOU'RE COVERED. AND WHETHER 
YOU COUNT COVERAGE BY NOSES OR COUNTIES, IF YOU'RE 
COUNTING ON COMPLETE COVERAGE IN THE NEW YORK 
AREA YOU NEED WPAT . . . METROPOLITAN NEW YORK'S 
REIGNING GOOD MUSIC STATION. WPAT AND WPAT-FM, 
NOW BROADCASTING FROM OUR NEW FM TRANSMITTER 
SITE ATOP THE CHRYSLER TOWER, GIVES YOUR PRODUCT 
COMBINED COVERAGE OF 31 COUNTIES IN NEW YORK, 
NEW JERSEY, PENNSYLVANIA AND CONNECTICUT ... AN 
AREA WHERE MORE THAN 17,000,000 PEOPLE LIVE, WORK 
AND BUY IN MORE THAN 5,000,000 RADIO HOMES. THEY 
DON'T ALL LISTEN TO WPAT BUT MORE OF THEM 
DO THAN YOUR COMMERCIAL MESSAGE CAN AFFORD TO 
MISS. WE'RE MEDIA MEN, NOT METEOROLOGISTS BUT 
WE'LL HAZARD A FORECAST: YOUR SALES OUTLOOK WILL 
BRIGHTEN THE MOMENT YOU BEGIN ADVERTISING ON 

RADIO STATION WPAT 




SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 




TODAY... THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A RADIO STATION IS MEASURED RY 
THE AMOUNT OF GOODS IT SELLS. And in Sacramento, KXOA sells more of every- 
thing, including tobacco, because it reaches, influences and appeals to more people. The 
unique KXOA "Sound" coupled with extensive news coverage and promotional activities 
has made KXOA the station in the prosperous Sacramento Valley. Rated first by Pulse* and 
KXOA sells more because it reaches and influences more people. 



KXOA— First in Sacramento, California's Capital 





49th an 

ui" 

Madisoi 



L REPRESENTATIVES: DAREN F. McGAVREN CO., INC. /SOUTH: CLARKE BROWN CO. 
• KAGO (formerly KFJI) Klamath Falls. Oreaon. Rep. Paul H. Raymer Co. 



H 



Fm forge-ahead 

I was much impressed with the fm 
round-up story — "Why Fm Is Picking 
Up Speed," in your 30 April i<sue. 
and we have ordered extra copies for 
use of our sales staff. 

The faith that many advertisers and 
agencies have in the selling power of 
this medium is reflected in their famil- 
iarity with and enthusiasm for \our 
comprehensive fm report. Vi e find fm 
is picking up speed. Many prospective 
clients we see are considering fm for 
the first time, and others are recon- 
sidering it on a national and regional 
basis rather than only at the local 
level. 

As you know, I have just organized 
a new subsidiary company — FM 
Broadcasting System. Inc. — and our 
national sales staff is now in the 
process of talking with advertisers 
and their agencies about the actuality 
as well as the vast potential of this 
phase of sound broadcasting. 

I think our faith in fm is amply 
testified to by the organization of this 
new company, and by the fact that 
we represent the first national fm net- 
work of 49 affiliates. 

Sidney J. Wolf 

president 

FM Broadcasting System. Inc. 

Chicago 



Kudos 

Glad to see that the light touch hasn't 
been abandoned in trade reporting, 
as per example your article on Sac- 
ramento Tomato Juice in the 4 Iul\ 
issue. 

Seems to me your writer captured 
just the right flavor and told a most 
palatable story. I don't mean that 
I want gags instead of ingredients 
I media strategy, creative side, mer 
chandising highlights, etc. I but w hen 
warranted, a light treatment can get 
smileage while informing. 

While passing out the hosannas. 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



t me extend one to Herb Levart 
>r some of the best photo work I've 
;en in any trader. I suppose it's 
asier to take a beautiful picture of 
le sun setting behind George Wash- 
lgton Bridge than of a glass of to- 
lato juice, but you wouldn't know it 
om his truly artistic shots. 

Norm Flynn 

Broadcast Times Sales 

N.Y.C. 



orrected data 

>ata shown in the recent release of 
.RB estimates of television house- 
olds I SPONSOR, 20 June), pertaining 
) St. Louis, Missouri, should be cor- 
ected to read: Total Households, 
65,900; Television Households, 428,- 
00; Percent with Tv. 92. 

Maurice Abrams 
mgr., res. plnng. & design 

American Research Bureau, Inc. 

Beltsville, Md. 



onvention cynicisr 

happened to be glancing at the 27 
une "Sponsor Speaks" where you 
alk about the great job the radio and 
v nets are going to do covering the 
lolitical conventions. I hope so. But 
omehow I think all the publicity 
hat's been devoted to the extent and 
[uality of the coverage may backfire. 
rhus far there doesn't seem to have 
teen too much effort made to dis- 
inguish between developments of sig- 
tificance and hypoed puff. Perhaps 
he trend will reverse itself. But what 
;ind of sane, analytical reporting may 
ve expect in this souped-up atmos- 
ihere? Does anyone suspect that 
alse glitter and artificial drama will 
lo the advertiser any good? 

E. E. Cogan 
Cogan Associates 
N.Y.C. 



:xpectanr! 

jlad to read in your 4 July issue that 
t'ou plan to include an updated "Time- 
buyers of the U. S." in your Air 
Media Basics. I know of no other 
'eadily available source in trade mag- 
azines of this information. Been wait- 
ing for vour updated version since 
1958. 

John Falcetta 

H-R Representatives, Inc. 

N.Y.C. 



Editorial Leadership : 

radio's best way to build 
community respect and sales! 




I. ess ie<ogni/ed, but coming to the fore, 
is the fact that radio is just as powerful 
as an editorial medium. 

For the highest form of community serv- 
ice is community leadership. 

American cities today have the most ag- 
gravated problems in our history. Radio 
editoiials. serious interest and participation 
in local affairs can lead the way to their 
solution. 

Working from this philosophy of com- 
munity responsibility; here are a few of the 
things achieved by editorializing on WAVZ 
and WTRY. 



DANIEL W. KOPS, President 
WTRY • WAVZ 



Turned a pig la 
housing project. 

Urged federation 
ing. New records v 
sultant drives. 



Redevelopm 
ricts and oth 



nt ol < 



business 'lis 
ojects total- 
dollars are 



ing hundreds of mill 
changing the faces of 

Construction of a modern airport icr 

These results have built a greater aware- 
ness of WTRY and WAVZ, bigger audi- 
ences and sales. 

The conclusion: responsible EDITORIAL 
LEADERSHIP is radios job. It is also 
radio's best way to build respect and sales. 



WAVZ • WTRY 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



ALBANY, SCHENECTADY, TROY, N. Y. 



In Roanoke in '60 
the Selling Signal 
is SEVEN... 

Roanoke is an ideal test market. 
Isolated from competing markets. 
Diversified industry. Self-contained 
economy. Large population. Many 
distribution outlets. 

Put Roanoke on your schedule, 
and don't fumble the ball when 
buying television. Specify WDBJ-TV 
. . . serving over 400,000 TV homes 
of Virginia, N. Carolina and W. Va. 
in counties having a population of 
nearly 2,000,000. 

Sell like sixty on seven. We'll help 
you to cross those sales goal lines. 

ASK YOUR PGVY COLONEL 
FOR CURRENT AVAILABILITIES 




Roanoke/ Virginia 



^■Fl 


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^R^*" 7 ■ " TM PHECB 


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frS?- 


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B< >Ki 




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CHANNEL 


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SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 




a tPangfgtop 
radio 



in celebration of 

WWJ's 40th ANNIVERSARY.. 

The World's First Commercial Radio Station — WWJ-The Detroit News — invites al! 
advertisers and personnel of their advertising agencies to participate in celebrating 
WWJ's 40th Anniversary. 

To join the celebration, just match dates with events as listed on this page, and mail the 
whole page to: 40th ANNIVERSARY, Radio Station WWJ, Detroit 31, Michigan. 

Senders of the first 40 correct or most nearly correct answers will each receive a neM 
transistor radio as an Anniversary Remembrance from WWJ. 

One entry per person. In case of ties, first postmarked entries will be declared winners 
Contest will close at midnight, August 20, 1960. All entrants will be notified of winner: 
by mail. 



Dates and events 
are jumbled. Have 
fun straightening 
them out by writing 
the letter that 
signifies the cor- 
rect date the event 
occurred in the box 
next to the event. 



□ WWJ becomes an original affiliate of NBC 

□ WWJ broadcasts first play-by-play direct-from-the-scene baseball (Detroit 
vs. Cleveland) 

□ WWJ broadcasts first radio newscast of election returns and general 
news items 

□ WWJ inaugurates first regularly scheduled religious broadcasts (Easter 
Sunday from St. Paul's Cathedral, Detroit); services have been broadcast 
every Sunday since 

□ WWJ originates first broadcast of a complete symphony concert (Detroit 
Symphony Orchestra) 

□ WWJ first goes on the air with regularly scheduled daily programs 

□ WWJ broadcasts first play-by-play direct-from-the-scene football (Michigan 
vs. Wisconsin) 

□ Thomas E. Dewey, "a baritone from Owosso, Michigan" sings over WWJ 

□ WWJ does first broadcast of national election returns (Harding vs. Cox) 
Q WWJ makes first "missing person" broadcast; later Detroit Police Depart- 
ment station, WC0P, is founded as result 



a. August 20, 1920 

b. October 25, 1924 

c. November 15, 1926 

d. April 19, 1927 

e. August 31, 1920 

f. Xoiember2,1920 

g. April 16, 1922 

h. February 10, 1922 
i. March 15, 1922 
j. June 9, 1922 



COMPANY OR AGENCY_ 
STREET ADDRESS 



\JkW\JkW I AM and FM 

W Wd RADIO 

Detroit's Basic Radio Station 



NBC Affiliate 



NATIONAL REPESENTATIVES: PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE DETROIT NEWS 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 196(1 



& SPONSOR 

Ti JULY 1961 



V CLIENTS AT THE DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION 




THE CBS SETUP at the Democratic Convention in Los Angeles. Westingh, 



HOW THEY SOLD AT THE CONVENTION 

Here's an at-setside report on commercials at the Democratic 
Convention in Los Angeles, and how 13 network sponsors fared 



by JOHN E. McMILLIN 

#%t 8:11 p.m. E.D.T. on the evening of 11 July 
just three minutes before Paul Butler succeeded in 
opening the 33rd Convention of the Democratic 
Party, ABC interrupted its tv coverage of the pro- 
ceedings for a special announcement: 

See prehistoric monsters locked in mortal com- 
bat!" shrieked a frantic, frenzied voice. "Cross the 
Graveyard of the Doomed!" 



These Cassandra-toned greetings were not, as you 
might have expected, a bitter, mordant political 
commentary and prophecy of things to come. 

They were merely part of a lurid trailer for the 
20th Century Fox production of the Lost World, a 
trailer, incidentally, which featured a couple of the 
most sheepish-looking papier-mache dinosaurs that 
Conan Doyle ever dreamed of. 

To me, this was the advertising highspot of the 



sponsor • 18 JULY 1960 



entire Convention. Between them the 
three networks had managed to pick 
up 13 sponsors l"i the Los Vngeles 
shenanigans, ranging from Bufferin 
.in.l Belaii ( ligarettes to Wco's solemn 
explanation of the tongue-tw isting sci- 
ence of "magnetohydrodynamics," 

Bui I kepi thinking of "prehistoric 
monsters locked in mortal combal 
,i~ I watched the beavy-jowled, cigar 
crunching faces on the Boor of the 



BETTY: FIRST LADY 
FOR THIRD TIME 




BETTY FURNESS «ai itar Westingho, 

sales gal at Conventions of 1952, 1956, 
well as at the Los Angeles arena in M 



>|k >i I- \icna. \iul there were main 
times when it looked all too like the 
"Graveyard of the Doomed." 

Foi sheer advertising weight, of 
course, and perhaps for the varietj 
.mil complexity of its t\ commercial 
treatments, the honor? went again to 
\\ estinghouse. 

I nlike NBC which had eight tab- 
paying customers, and ABC which 
had four. CBS had sold its entire 
coverage to the Pittshurgh electrical 
giant and Betty Furness & Co. were 
all over the place as they had been 
in 1952 and 1956. 

I watched Betty and her daughter 
in a number of Westinghouse chores 
luit to get a panorama of convention 
advertising I found myself switching 
nervously from one network channel 
to the other. 

Not that it made a great deal of 
difference in picture coverage. Mayor 
Poulson of Los Angeles looked the 
same on NBC, ABC and CBS and 
considerably less jaunty than in his 
Khrushchev set-to last year. 

I did find, however, that the Hunt- 
ley-Brinklev comments on NBC were 
considerably more witty and pungent 
than the anchor work of Walter Cron- 
kite and John Daly on the other net- 
works, and maybe this will be re- 
flected in the ratings. 

As to the tv commercials at Los 
Angeles, there were some startling 
differences and perhaps it may be 
possible to draw r a few advertising 
lessons and conclusions. 

First of all, how T appropriate is it 
to have "sponsored conventions"? 
Does a schedule of minutes, 20's and 
IDs detract from the solemnity of the 
occasion? 

From Cardinal Mclntyre who de- 
livered the invocation to Senator 
Frank Church, the Boy Orator of the 
Snake River who gave the keynote 
address, every speaker stressed the 
"What does all this portend for 
America?" note. 

"» ou might expect that a pounding 
plea to buy Goodrich H. T. Silver- 
town tires — "only $11.95 and up," or 
to "enroll as a salesman for 'World 
Book Encyclopedias'" might intrude 
on such sober patriotism. 

But strangely enough it didn't seem 
to, at least to me. One reason, of 
course, is that all of us who are regu- 
lar t\ viewers have come to accept 



commercial interruptions as a conven- 
tional part of the game. 

To our perhaps jaded eyes it 
seemed no more improbable to follow 
Paul Butlers swan song speech as 
Chairman of the Democratic National 
Committee with a plug for Westing- 
house transistor radios, than to follow 
the mad scene in Hamlet with a com- 
mercial for a headache remedy. 

We're toughened to it. and it does- 
n't seem to matter. 

I'll admit, though, that I was a 
little startled bv what happened when 
Governor Pat Brown of California 
was gh in« his Golden State welcoming 
address. 

The cameras framed Brown on the 
podium I according to David Brinkley 
the Democrats scorn to call it a 
rostrum I. and suddenlv 20th Centurv 
Fox. the gay Til Eulenspiesel of all 
convention sponsors, superimposed a 
sales message for the John O'Hara 
movie "From the Terrace" over the 
Governor's solemn physiognomy. 

I got the impression that this was 
intended to implv that the picture 
deals with a California-tvpe terrace, 
or patio-type podium or something. 

But in general, the commercial in- 
terruptions of Convention proceedings 
seemed a perfectlv normal, natural | 
part of the tv scene. 

L ndouhtedlv the fact the Conven- 
tion itself is a big. sprawling, formless 
and rather poorlv organized tv show 
had a lot to do w ith it. 

For months Sis Mickelson of CBS 
and others have been telling us that 
this vear "the Conventions are going 
to he built around tv." 

Well, maybe so. But to me the 
circus and hoopla at Los Angeles 
still seemed more designed to impress 
the delegates and visitors in the Sports 
Arena than what Butler called the 
"hundreds of millions of tv viewers.' - 
i Check that with Nielsen or ARB.) 

For one reason the speakers, with- 
out exception, had that glazed "I'm 
speaking to a mighty miltitude" ex- 
pression which was great stuff when 
Br\an brought down the house with 
his Cross of Gold oratorv. but is 
hardlv suitable for the modern "three 
or four persons in a livingroom' 
medium of television. 

For another, the merciless eyes of 
the tv cameras kept picking up dis- 
tractions which hardlv contributed 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



I 



AVCO: TURNED HANDSPRINGS TO PRODUCE TV SPOTS 



Avco Corporation and Benton & Bowles agency- 
hit supersonic speeds in producing highly technical 
commercials for Convention. Client made ABC 
package buy morning of 29 June. With no com- 
mercials available, here's diary of action. 

29 June. Avco and B&B agree on six basic areas 
to be covered, set basic commercial pattern. B&B 
assigns writers, alerts set designer. Avco calls its 
divisions for films, stills, models. 

30 June. Avco technicians, films, scientific data 
arrive in New York. B&B reviews 15 hours of film 
clips, sends out casting calls. 

1 July. Rough commercial scripts reviewed. 
Twenty-nine announcers auditioned. Hugh James 
approved. Props, models, sets, tape studio ordered. 

2, 3, 4 July (weekend). Copy written and re- 
written. Film clips edited. 

5 July. B&B submits final scripts. Avco division 
ad managers called for phone approvals. Clearances 
rechecked. 

6 July. Sets brought to Videotape Center. Thirty- 
six takes of six commercials shot. Avco executives on 
set give approvals. Film transfers ordered. 

7 July. B&B account man Dale Strand leaves by 
jet for Los Angeles with commercials. 




CHECKING ON PRODUCTION of / 

namics" spot are (standing) Lew Wee 
dir., Dale Strand, a.e., Dave McAneny, w 



agnetohydrody- 
iB assoc. prgm. 
;k Griffith, Avco 



to the solemnity of the event. While 
Butler and Church engaged in some 
uf their most soaring flights of 

^rhetoric, we got glimpses of guys 
reading newspapers, guvs walking up 
and down the aisles with large 
paunches and large cigars, hatchet- 
faced dames chattering under im- 
probable hats, and the Golden Girl 

j usherettes swirling through the crowd. 
And finally, the speeches and a 
good many of the proceedings (the 
presentation of the Gideon Bible, the 
presentation of the South Dakota 
gavel, etc.) were so incredibly dull 
and repetitious that I didn't even 
mind looking at the rather conven- 
tional bathing girl commercials which 
Bown and Williamson dished up for 
Belair cigarettes. 

Of the sponsors whose work I 
caught, there seemed to be an almost 
even division between the "let's use 
our regular spots" school, I Mutual of 



18 JULY 1960 



Omaha. 20th Century Fox, Goodrich, 
Bristol-Myers. Brown and William- 
son) and the "let's do special ones" 
advocates (Lipton, Look, Avco. West- 
inghouse I . Westinghouse, of course, 
which went in 100% for originals far 
outstripped all the rest in number of 
commercials. 

Lipton Tea had Eddie Albert doing 
live, and largely ad-libbed spots from 
a Convention setting. His technique 
was to interview delegates, wives and 
visitors, and to weave in easy, re- 
laxed plugs for "The pitcher of plea- 
sure, Lipton's Iced Tea." 

I thought he did an extremely 
friendly selling job, and one that was 
helped by his up-to-the-minute com- 
ments, "Well that was quite a speech 
that Senator Church just gave.'' 

Avco. which put on a nine-day sweat 
to produce six special commercials on 
tape I see box I concentrated on in- 
stitutional copy for some of it more 



abstruse projects (I saw a neatly done 
plug on its missile nosecone research) 
and used part of its time for a re- 
cruiting pitch. 

I'm not quite sure of the thinking 
behind this I "World Book Encyclope- 
dias" were also recruiting like craz\ i . 
but then why shouldn't you sell jobs 
as well as Bufferin and Look maga- 
zine against a political backdrop? 

The big commercial question, of 
course, was whether the big Westing- 
house blanketing of CBS really paid 
off. Westinghouse was using 60 dif- 
ferent commercials for the two Con- 
ventions, with roughly 509? going to 
consumer products like transistors, 
refrigerators, etc. 25% to electric 
homes, and 259; to corporate and 
institutional. 

Betty Furness. whose voice has 
some harsh strident overtones that 
make me think it must have been 
especially effective before micro- 



TV SPONSORS AT CONVENTION 



!fi Westinghouse Corp. 

™J (KM&G; McC-E; Grey) 



Corporate, Consumer 
& Electric Home 



Mutual of Omaha 

(Bozell & Jacobs) 



Tape 

Special 



u 


Twentieth Century-Fox 

(Chas. Schlaifer & Co.) 


Tape/film 


The Lost World t 
From the Terrace 


CO 

< 


Avco Manufacturing 

(B&B) 


Tape 
Special 


Institutional 




DuPont 

(BBDO) 


Regular 


#7 Car Polish 




Thomas J. Lipton Co. 

(SSC&B) 


Live 
Special 


Iced Tea 




Brown & Wmsn, Tob. 

(Bates) 


Tape 
Regular 


Kentucky Kings 
& Belair 


o 

CO 


Cowles Magazines, Inc. 

(McC-E) 


Live/cartoon 


Look Magazine 


z 


Bristol-Myers 

(Y&R) 


Tape 
Regular 


Buff erin 




Field Enterprises, Inc. 

(Keyes, Madden & Jones) 


Film 
Regular 


World Book t 
Child Craft 




B. F. Goodrich Co. 

(BBDO) 


Film 
Regular 


Tires 



; : ■ "\\ ■ 



phones were perfected, did her usual 
professional job. Her daughter Babbie, 
an unusually pretty just-out-of-Smith 
graduate, added brightness to several 
Westinghouse presentations I Baw. 

But frankly I didn't think that the 
\\ eetinghouse commercials themselves 
were particularly distinguished for 
originality or creative selling, and a 
fen had some pretty dreadful dia- 
logue. i For instance, Betty discussing 
a Gold Medallion Home told Babbie 
that it would be "nice for casual va- 
cation living." ' 

On the whole. 1 believe that the 



Westinghouse purchase on CBS will 
have to be judged solely on the basis 
of a media buy — how many homes, 
and viewers, for how much? 

As to the Convention itself, there 
were a couple of references which 
seemed to me to have particular 
significance to the ad business. One 
was the swipe which Keynoter Church 
took at the Administration. "No 
sooner had the Eisenhower team been 
installed than Madison Avenue eager- 
ly took charge and a barrage of 
bland ballyhoo soon filled the land." 
Nobodv loves us admen, do they ^ 



RADIO CLIENTS AT THE 



Web radii 



^ Two-network buy de r 

7 nan 

signed to fill gaps in spot N 

Mei 
campaign; tv to be limited l; 

be cc 
^ Westinghouse continuing h 

Convention coverage on CBS B |, 

for corporate image and sales m \ 

L 



\Ji the four national advertiser; 
who are sponsoring Convention cover-- 
age via network radio, The Mennen E ' 
Co.'s buy is probably the most signifi- r ," 
cant. 

The men's toiletries firm, now tak-j P 1 ' 
ing a breather between the Demo-' 
cratic and Republican Conventions, is 
heavily involved in radio this year in 
the wake of a recent major switch to 
the am media. 

The Mennen purchase includes one- 
half of ABC and one-quarter of NBC 
coverage. Other advertisers are West-I 
ingtouse Electric Corp. with 100% ofj 
CBS time, the S. C. Johnson Co. with 
another quarter of NBC, and Liggett 
& Myers Tobacco Co. for Oasis Cigar 
ettes, which has 207c of Mutual's 
coverage. Network affiliates are selling 
50% of the ABC and NBC broadcasts 
and 80% of MBS time locally, and 
will retain all revenue accrued from 
their sales. 

Mennen's convention purchase is 
the second phase of a policy shift in- 
augurated 1 June when the compam 
and its agency, Warwick & Legler. 
doubled the radio budget and cut 
back on television. According to 
Joseph T. Lawrence, Mennen account 
executive at W&L, network radio 
expected to solve problems of lack of 
frequency and coverage that have 
been encountered since adoption of a 
large spot radio campaign last month. 

"We have limited our television for 
perhaps two seasons," Lawrence re- 
veals, "and have launched the spot 
radio campaign over 175 stations iri 
the 75 major markets. The Conven 
tion buv is intended to kick off • 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION 



at Los Angeles: Mermen's big switch 



iuch wider pattern and to back up 
lany of our salesmen not helped by 
pi television or spot radio." 

Mennen thoroughly merchandised 
':s participation in the Los Angeles 
Convention and salesmen throughout 
he country will be following through 
lirj (luring the G.O.P. conclave next week. 
X^&L expects to reach a very large 
tiale audience with the broadcasts, 
a | ( jnd at relatively low cost. More than 
200 NBC outlets and about 312 ABC 
tations are involved. 

Westinghouse, which will sponsor 
ill the CBS coverage on radio and tv, 
w Is sold on net radio as a means to 
achieve its major advertising goals: 
enhancing its corporate image of 
|a j public service and selling appliances. 
"With no other coverage than net- 
work radio's," a Westinghouse spokes- 
man declares, "we feel we've had an 
effective advertising program from 
Los Angeles and will have it again 

from Chicago. We think so much of 
t," he adds, "that for the first time 
jwe have a corporate spokesman for 
radio only — Melvin Douglas." 

Westinghouse has the entire CBS 
jhookup of more than 200 stations to 
go along with its CBS television spon- 
sorship, and is footing the bill for the 
third consecutive Convention year. 
It's agency. Ketchum, MacLeod & 
Grove, contends that "in the daytime 
and on summer nights there is noth- 
ing to beat network radio's coverage." 

The agency's estimate of radio's 
strength cannot yet be checked with 
the Los Angeles results, but A. C. 
Nielsen Co.'s tabulations for the 1956 
Conventions plus RAB's latest set 
count, probably went a long way in 
selling the network radio packages. 

According to Nielsen, 21 million 
American families listened in on net- 
work radio to some part of the last 
Democratic Convention and 15.6 mil- 
lion to the Republican conclave, 
which was a day shorter. Daily audi- 
ences ranged from 6.5 million to 13 
million homes, averaging 10.3 million 
a day for the Democrats and 8.2 mil- 
lion for the G.O.P. And these figures 
do not include radio's great summer 



18 JULY 1960 



plus, out-of-home and car audience. 

As a running-mate for television in 
1956, the four radio networks at- 
tracted 8,810,000 homes which never 
tuned to tv, extending network tele- 
vision more than 27', c and resulting 
in a combined coverage of 41 million 
homes, Nielsen reports. 

RAB counts almost 160 million 
working radios, with 40,400,000 auto 
radios and "millions of new port- 
ables, the vast majority ultra-compact 
transistor sets people carry with them 
as easily as a pack of cigarettes." The 
networks all expect that with the add 
tion of so many radios and the out-of- 
home audience, the 1960 radio listen- 
ership will far exceed the 1956 totals. 

Network officials contacted by SPON 



SOR also indicate that they feel Los 
Angeles gave them a terrific chance 
to prove some points about their me- 
dium. Delegations, scattered as far 
as 15 miles from the Sports Arena, 
were covered by radio newsmen car- 
rying shortwave gear. Observers noted 
that when reporters, delegates and 
demonstrators became crushed to- 
gether in the wake of a conference or 
caucus, sound was getting the story 
while tv occasionally looked like a 
documentary on sardine packing. 

"It was the roughest convention 
test the news media have ever faced," 
declares MBS president Robert F. 
Hurleigh. "For us, however, it was a 
golden opportunity, a geographic lay- 
out perfect for radio." ^ 



ROBERT TROUT, CBS's dean of political Convention reporters, acts c 
balloting. Mobile reporters covered key delegations in the hall 





'-•u 



CONSOLIDATING FORCES to go over last minute details of Coty Keyed-to-you color campaign are (l-r) Coty division product manager 
Bob Hull; Jane Gruen, fashion director, BBDO; Eugene Judd, advertising director at Coty; Ed Cauley and Bruce Sherman, a.e.'s at BBDO, 
and Wallace T. Drew, Coty v. p. and marketing director. The campaign introduces four new matching lipstick and nail polish shades 



Coty's new tv and print parlay 



^ This week Coty kicks off largest promotion ever with 
l\ spot in 50 markets, daytime net tv, color print 

^ Tv is used to highlight new fashion service, build 
store frame; color print shows Coty lipstick spectrum 



I his week Cot) will launch one of 
the biggesl color promotions ever to 
gel the green light in the tint-con- 
m ioua cosmetic industr) . 

I he No. 3 lipstick company (Rev- 
lon i- first, Max Factor second I has 
planned a late summer drive, tying in 
.1 Bpe hum of lipstick and nail polish 
shades with mj lady's fall wardrobe 
and male lied it all to her complexion 
lone. | he theor) : take the guesswork 
out of glamor anil make it eas) for 
an) woman to become a femme fatale 
l-\ showing her how to choose the 
Keyed-to-you" color that will 
harmonize with her particular com- 



plexion and with her costume as well. 

While Coty's king-size promotion 
points clearly to the use of color print 
media, the cosmetic firm, long partial 
to tv, is depending on video for a ma- 
jor role. Print is needed to illustrate 
the Coty spectrum, including four 
brand new shades, and graphically 
present the fashion service which is 
at the heart of the "Keved-to-vou" 
push. Tv is being used to give the 
campaign impetus and reach and pro- 
vide a do-it-now incentive to female 
viewers. 

Coty has bought minute announce- 
ments in approximately 50 markets 



and participations in five daytime net- 
work features on ABC and NBC ( the 
schedule on a sixth show. American 
Bandstand, doesn't start until after 27 
August, the end-date on the ''Keyed- 
to-you" promotion). This represents 
the biggest network buy for the com- 
pany that previously placed most of 
its tv monies in spot. 

"Our problem was different in the 
past," explains Bob Hull. Coty prod- 
uct manager. "Then we were introduc- 
ing one new lipstick shade at a time. 
But in this promotion we're introduc- 
ing four new shades along with a new 
service. We needed national coverage 
with high cost efficiency. Daytime net 
tv proved to be the answer." 

Studies prepared for Coty by BBDO 
point out that in a typical week day- 
time net tv penetrates into 85' < of 
I .S. tv homes, and in the summer, 
when average viewing is off bv 30' ^ . 
daytime drops by just 10 r r. A day- 
time schedule provides continuity of 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



•-sage, and hits a heavj viewing fe- 

ile audience with low cost efficiency. 
To illustrate. Coty has purchased 26- 
week schedules on Play Your Hunch 
and Young Dr. M alone l XBC I and 
on Day In Court, Love That Bob I re- 
runs I . and Who Do You Trust? 
I ABC i. All these shows have a rela- 
tively low cost-per-1.000 homes. In 
the above order, the figures are SI. 64. 
1.04, $1.23, 81.27 and S1.29. But 
the true test of cost efficiency is in 
how effectively these programs hit the 
Cot) target group. The cost-per-1.000 
for female viewers between the ages 
of 13-19 reflects the value of the 
schedule to the advertiser. These fig- 
ures, in the same order. S3. 81. SI. 67. 
S3.17. 82.28. and S2.86. In addition 
daytime network reach tends to paral- 
lel Cotv sales potential on a geograph- 
ic scale. 

The basic reason for Coty's buying 
on two networks is that one comple- 
ments the next as far as reach and 
frequency are concerned. But by buy- 
ing on two nets Coty also increases 
reach in areas where one net misht 
have a problem in clearing time. The 
network schedule also assures nation- 
al coverage in sections of the country 
where magazines are weak. 

A most important aspect of the pro- 
motion is department store participa- 
tion. Over 100 such leading stores 



are participating, devoting window 
display and counter space, and main 
of them will develop "Keyed-to-you" 
colors into a storewide theme. Stores 
have already ordered more than 6.000 
dummy lipstick containers and nail 
polish bottles, and better than 100,- 
000 consumer analysis sheets. These 
sheets will be used by Coty demon- 
strators at store cosmetic counters. 
The demonstrators will analyze a cus- 
tomer's complexion and describe what 
shades of lipstick and nail polish are 
right and which fall fashion colors 
will harmonize with them, and make 
a notation of all this information on 
the consumer analysis sheet which is 
given to the customer. The customer 
may then carry the sheet with her 
whenever she intends to shop for cos- 
metics and always know just what 
Cotv shades to choose. 

Print advertising has been most in- 
strumental in obtaining department 
store cooperation, but Wallace Drew. 
Coty v.p. and marketing director has- 
tens to point out that "it is rare that 
a main floor item will dominate an 
entire store and that few items that 
get storew ide treatment are supported 
by a national tv campaign." 

The majority of spots in this cam- 
paign are scheduled on late evening 
movies and some Paar, w ith addition- 
al slots in fringe and prime time. Hull 



explains that "we're after three audi- 
ence types. Primarily we hit house- 
wives with hour network daytime t\ 
schedule, the working girl with eve- 
ning spots, and the teenager with 
Bandstand, plus national magazines 
in all categories." 

The tv commercial produced spe- 
cially for this campaign is part live 
action film, part animation. To cre- 
ate the illusion of a range of color 
values the commercial opens on a se- 
ries of changing bars of varying 
lengths and varying degrees of in- 
tensity. The message is a fairly com- 
plex one, so that it is stated b\ the 
announcer as well as shown on one of 
the color bars. Once stated, the serv- 
ice theme of the message is illustrated 
by a model at a Coty display counter 
and is repeated at the end of the 
commercial, in a close-up of the dis- 
play itself. Original, vibrant music 
aids in creating a non-specific illu- 
sion of color. 

Coty will be continuing in spot tv 
for its other products during this 
campaign for lipstick and nail polish. 
Company officials report nearlv 709? 
of the year's ad budget is slated for 
air media. As for the future, tv will 
play a major role, in which consider- 
ation v.p. Drew has said. "We await 
with great anticipation the full blos- 
soming of color tv." ^ 



COMMERCIAL KEPT SIMPLE TO TELL COMPLEX MESSAGE 







BY COTY 




ILLUSION OF COLOR created by moving bars gives message impact. Made by MPO, BBDO producer was Chan Buck, writer Dick Hedin 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



THE HIGH COST OF 
AGENCY TV TALENT 

^ Policy of agenc) tv chiefs is to 'pay money to pro- 
tecl money' as they clamor for programing pros 

^ Despite turnover of show control to networks and 
suppliers, agencies now have costliest tv complex ever 



I his coming fall, agencies will 
reach their lowest point in direct con- 
trol of t\ programing, with nine out 
..t evei j 10 shows concentrated in the 
production hand- ol the networks and 
suppliers. Yet, at the same time, costs 
of maintaining hiuh-powered agency 
television pics and the complex tv 
program structures which they super- 
\ ise have never heen so high. 

Is it paradoxical that agencies' tv 
overhead -oars as their immediate 



control of tv programing declines? 
This is what sponsor asked advertis- 
ers as well as agency executives last 
week. And this is what they said: 

• It costs a lot of money to pro- 
tect a lot of money, and that's what's 
involved in network television pro- 
graming today. As McCann's Terence 
Clyne, chairman and general mana- 
ger of the new M-E Productions Di- 
vision, commented: "We're gambling 
with someone else's money, and a lot 



of it." It takes a real pro to know 
where to put his program bets. 

• The program vehicle has never 
been more important in the over-all 
marketing strategy of a blue-chip ad- 
vertiser. But acceptance and super- 
vision of the show is still the agency's 
responsibility, even though actual 
production maj be carried on else- 
where. 

• Competition for audience and 
for sales is at its roughest. This is 
why agencies are willing to pav their 
top tv men anywhere from $60,000 
to $100,000 ... and wh> the more 
sophisticated advertisers agree with 
agency management that the money- 
is well spent. Tv department mana- 
gers, in addition to knowing their 
immediate tv trade, these days must 
also be top-level marketing and ad- 
vertising men. Perhaps more impor- 
tantly, they must be salesmen. 

How do they sell? By backing 
what is usually a multi-million dollar 
tv recommendation with a persuasive 
presentation to the client. Client con- 
tact is increasingly important for 
these top program-production people 



CREATIVE TV PEOPLE in agencies account for biggest single ite 
r): Rollo W. Hunter, v. p. and director of tv radio; Victor Watson, , 



in departmental budget. Typical creative plans group at EWRR (I to 
, producer; Havis Medwiclc, bus. mgr.; Jack Schwartz, senior tv producer 



U 



r" -& 



McCANN HAS MOST COMPLEX AGENCY TV UNIT 



CHAIRMAN 
GENERAL-MAN ACER 




PACE-SETTER in tv programing trends is McCann-Ericltson's new M-E Productions Div. headed by 


C. T. (Tc 


rry) Clyne as chairman and general 


manager. He's assisted by some of highest paid tv/radio pros in the business, heads international 


and McCa 


nn-Marshallc tv work as well as U. S. 


in vast complex of specialists. Above organizational chart shows how responsibility sifts from hi 


n downwc 


rd in highly structured hierarchy 



because so much of a total manu- 
facturer's ad appropriation goes to 
television. 

The demands for the rounded tv 
program executive are so great, says 
Terry Clyne. that his "responsibil- 
ity, below that of actual management, 
is as great as anyone bears." There- 
fore, the high salaries paid to agency 
tv people are not disproportionate 
and — for that matter — can be argued 
as low compensation for the value of 
the work performed. 

He contends there are "no more 
than 12" proficient, high-grade televi- 
sion executives among all of the top 
advertising agencies. And he cites 
some McCann figures which indicate 
the trend which even medium and 
small agencies are following. M-E 
Productions Division of McCann- 
Erickson has been billing at the an- 
nual rate of about S100 million in tv 



and radio, of which Clyne estimates 
operating costs for the unit at SI. 2 
million. Of this last sum, some 75% 
or $900,000 goes directly to salaries. 
This represents, bv far. the bi^ 
single portion of a departmental bud 
get, and even in smaller agencies sel 
dom ranges below 60%. The i 
age is nearer 70%. 

S. J. ( Sy l Frolick, senior v. p. in 
charge of tv and radio at Fletcher 
Richards, Calkins & Holden, says 
"there are few really good, skilled 
people'" in the production and writ- 
ing area, which is why top workers 
get more than 820,000 a year. But 
vounger production assistants earn a 
respectable 87.500 to 810,000. And 
Rollo Hunter, v. p. for broadcast at 
Erwin. Wasey. Ruthrauff & Ryan, 
says the "going rate for a film pro- 
ducer today is up about 83.000 from 
onlv three vears ago." 



These men, and other executives 
queried by SPONSOR, agree that the 
past three or four years have marked 
a turning point in agency television 
operations. Here are the trends thev 
see evolving: 

• The biggest agencies and the 
most sophisticated clients realize that 
the agencv has renounced none of its 
creative responsibility as direct show 
control has moved to the networks 
and to suppliers I packagers, inde- 
pendent producers, etc. I . 

• But many medium and small 
agencies have "taken the easy way 
out" by relieving themselves of this 
creative responsibility and collecting 
their 15% commissions. 

• There's client grousing at these 
middle and lower budget levels, how- 
ever, as they rebel against the stand- 
ard 159r being applied to tv shows on 
which the advertising agencies do a 



18 JULY 1960 



relative!) little amount <>f work. 

• Biggei shops, and tin- more pro- 
gressive Bmallei agencies, contend 
thai advertisers are far more saw) 
than even foui years ago. Todaj the) 
are demanding and getting much 
mure in the wa) of Ben ice, research, 
cop) and all related functions within 
the agenc) proper. 

• Specialization is on the move 
with, for example, sour- agencies so 
segmented in their work-a-day job 
functions thai there are separate 
'"film" producers and "tape" produc- 



ers — and never the twain shall overlap. 

• This specialization meansahigh- 
er degree of skill, but a lessened 
chance for the development of the 
all-around television-marketing-adver- 
tising executive. 

• The most immediate trend. 
which i< manifest in ever) phase of 
t\ production, is the upward move in 
costs. 

A major cost continues to be sala- 
ries, and "television advertising re- 
quires high-salaried people," in the 
opinion of Frederic R. Gamble. 




MEDIUM size agency, FRC&H, maintains +v LARGE agency, McCann, has 29 tv executives 

staff of 16, headed by v. p. S. J. (Sy) Froliclt in production, reports Chm. Terry Clyne 



HOW CLIENTS AD AGENCY MEN 
DIFFER ON SHOW COMMISSIONS' 



Tv adv. mgr. opinion 



Tv agency opinion 



MORE THAN 15% 


31.19? 


6.2', 


12.8'; 


69.7% 


15% 


Mi.;; 


35.3 


29.7 


80.9 


LESS THAN 15% 


8.1 


58.5 


.6 


6.3 


(EFFECTIVE SAMPLE) 


i 520 1 


546) 


1 189 I 


1 258 i 



. 'I.ttl II \>,: 



president <>f the American Assn. of 
Advertising Agencies. The associa- 
tion's reports on its member agencies 
and their trends are kept within the 
group and secret from the industn at 
large. But in a report for the Harvard 
Business Revietv last fall he quoted 
Robert E. Lusk, president of Benton 
& Bowles, and Ernest A. Jones, presi- 
dent of MacManus, John & Adams. 

Said Lusk: "I found we employ 15 
motion picture producer-directors full 
time. Last year we produced more 
film footage for television commer- 
cials than MGM did in feature mov- 
ies. In the department that is respon- 
sible for the programing (not the 
commercials I of television programs, 
we employ 92 people." 

And Jones, commenting that tv in- 
cludes a lot of "mercurial" work, 
said: "Much of the cost of a new 
program or new advertising series is 
incurred before the client sees it. If it 
does not appeal to him. we have to 
start all over again without reim- 
bursement for the work already done. 
I This I points up a major item of cost 
to any agency advertising on tv. 

Rising costs are inevitable as union 
contracts are concluded and renewed, 
and most of the writers, actors, pro- 
ducers and technicians with whom 
agencies work on shows and commer- 
cials are affected by union pay hikes. 
The unions, in turn, have a direct ef- 
fect on soaring agency personnel 
costs, says Rollo Hunter. 

"Inevitably, the people at the agen- 
cy who have supervisory responsibil- 
ity over the well-paid union workers 
start a ground-swell for the same 
scales. There's a union rub-off! 

High costs are implicit in every 
phase of the agency's tv operation. 
Installation of technical equipment, 
alone, is expensive, as agencies have 
been forced to hire union projectors, 
construct viewing and screening 
rooms, install television sets, cameras. 
recording equipment. And another 
major item is travel expense, as tv 
people rush from coast to coast. 

These expenses, of course, are inci- 
dental to the day-to-day operating 
costs of the tv complex. Even though 
agencies buy packages or network 
programs, they still go through tor- 
tuous time, talent and facilities nego- 
tiations, screenings and conferences 
and planning stages before deciding 
l Please turn to page 50) 



sponsor • 18 JULY 196C 



v station break teams weather, 20-second spot 



v„ 



hoever said. ''Everyone talk? 
iout the weather but nobody does 
■thing about it," was sadly mis- 
ken. 
Because weather, like manv an old 




yet popular topic, turned into a highly 
profitable idea for one station with 
foresight and an advertiser who 
quick!) recognized it. 

It all started last February, when 
Al Gillen, v.p., WAPI-TV, Binning- 
ham, Ala., and Bob Gilbertson of the 
station's rep firm Harrington. Righter 
and Parsons, hit upon a new slant for 
the station: selling advertising instead 
of just availabilities. 

Toying with the possibilities of this 
idea, the two men moved from the 
general to the specific — namely, the 
problems which face beer advertisers 
in the Birmingham market, and how 
they could best be met. Gilbertson 
reasoned that the low unit price of 
beer, which depends on mass volume 
sales, required frequency of sched- 
ules. Gillen's solution to the laxity of 
consumer acceptance due to Ala- 
bama's many dry counties, was to 
identify beer with a program service 



so that viewers would feel they were 
being entertained while watching the 
commercials. 

At quick look at the tv schedules 
of the two Birmingham stations 
revealed that (luring the hour- of 
6:45 p.m. and 10:45 p.m. neither 
station aired a weather report. Taking 
it from there, Gillen and Gilbertson 
envisaged a station break combining a 
30-second commercial message and 
weather report ( 10-seconds of weath- 
er, followed by 20-second filmed spots, 
Monday to Friday, 8:30 p.m. i. as an 
ideal outlet for a beer advertiser, since 
it would provide a needed service to 
viewers and allow the advertiser satu- 
ration and impact of program spon- 
sorship. The rest of the plan fell to- 
gether easily when only a few weeks 
later an advertiser was found — Sterl- 
ing Brewers of Evansville, Indiana — 
who recognized the full potential of 
(Please turn to page 69 i 



Want speedy tv commercials? Marry film and tape 



I he portability of film and the 
I speed of video tape were married re- 
| cently in a commercial production 
1 parlay where speed was of the es- 
sence. 

The problem confronting Larson 
Boat Works, Inc., Little Falls, Minn., 
was this: The boat-selling season was 
coining to a close: if a last minute 
sale- push was to be made, it had to 
be done quickly. Larson decided that 
tv was the best solution for this "im- 
mediate impact" drive. 

The problem confronting the boat 
manufacturer's agencv. Pidgeon Sav- 
age Lewis. Inc.. Minneapolis, was 
this: How to shoot location commer- 
cials involving action shots of boats 
— from a boat — and have them on 
; the air in less than a week for a cam- 
paign involving two West Coast mar- 
■ kets, one of which called for 42 spots 
a week. 

With the help of Thomas Country- 
man Film Productions I who came up 



with the idea of using both film and 
tape), and with a big assist from the 
tape staff of WCCO-TV, Minneapolis- 
St. Paul, the job was done in five 
days. 

Here's the crux of PSL's dilemma: 
Taping from a boat I action shots 
were required I was not feasible, so 
film was the only practical medium 
for the original shooting. But nor- 
mal film developing techniques would 
have taken too long. 

Normally, the two picture rolls and 
a magnetic sound track would have 
to be sent to a Chicago or New York 
lab. The lab would have made an 
optical sound track and printed it 
with the two picture rolls to make a 
composite print. An answer print 
would have to be checked and ap- 
proved or corrected, and finished 
prints made. Total film process from 
the time the original film was edited 
to the time prints were delivered: 
(Please turn to page 69 I 




WATCHING playback of film comme 
are. (l-r) Dick Hatch of Pidgeon Sa< 
Lewis agency, Tom Countryman, prodi 
and Frank Kettler, WCCO-TV, Mpls.-St. 



18 .illy 1960 



PART II OF A TWO-PART SERIES: 



COMMERCIALS FESTIVAL: treni 



^ Analysis of winners shows 43% relied importantly 
•n humor. Ahout half used music to bolster sales pitch 

^ Live action picture stories, non-verbal approach, 
\i<l«o tape demonstration rated high among techniques 



I his is the second of a two-part 
analysis of the results of the recent 
American Tv Commercial? Festival. 
SPONSOR'S upcoming Air Media Basics 
uill carry the complete list of 83 

iward Winners tilth advertiser, 
mzency and production company 
credits. 



by WALLACE A. ROSS 

tctor, The American Tv Commercials 



Analysis of the winners and the 
Top 250 Commercials of 1959-60. as 
chosen by the 50 advertising execu- 
tives who judged the recent first 



American Tv Commercials FestiA 
shows a distinct preference for t 
"softer" sell. 

In the new attempt to bi 
through television's plethora of sai 
messages — often characterized by t 
public as "too much" and in part 
the FTC as "too bad." the trend 
toward more entertainment, le 
pitch, more effective product demo 
stration. and increased audience r 
volvement. 

One primary purpose of the fesi 
val was to upgrade commercials r.1 
focusing recognition on the outstan 
ing work. 

Criteria employed by the 34 agenc 



TECHNIQUES USED BY 83 AWARD WINNERS & TOP 250 



TECHNIQUE 


39 WINNERS & 
CITATIONS 


44 RUNNERS-UP & 
HON. MENTIONS 


TOP 250 


25 CLASSICS 


Live Action 


26 


29 




150 (60% 1 


« 


Animation 


8 


10 




66 I 26 r , i 


13 


Combined 


2 


2 




7 (3% 1 


X 


Stop Motion 


1 


1 




9 (4% l 


1 


Puppets 


X 


1 




5 (2% ) 


1 


Squeeze Motion 


2 


1 




6(2 r r 1 


X 


Special Effects 


X 


X 




44(18', ) 


4 


I idea Tape 


9* 


6* 




31 (12%) 


X 


Color 


5 


1 




22(9%) 


1 


Humor 


19 


17 




92(37 f f ) 


8 


Demonstration 


22 


15 




99 (40 f r ) 


10 


Strong Copy Sell 


26 


29 




86(34 r , ) 


8 


Choral or Jingle 


11 


3 




28 ill', i 


7 


Orchestral Scoring 


8 


9 




56(22 r ; ) 


5 


Sound Effects 


3 


3 




8(3S I 


2 


Son-Verbal 


4 


4 




8 (3% l 


X 




n.| Honorable Mention Citation 


- fo: Video Tape Production. 










I!|ftl!llll ' 'llillllllilllllllllllllll 




iniiiiiin !'iiii ; i . .. . 


I'll 1 lliiflll,: ":il|i| 1 CIIIHIIIUIUfli 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 196*' 



to the softer tv sell 



in. 13 advertising and marketing 
Mors, one station president and 
1 3 trade publication critics who 
i ide up the Tv Commercials Coun- 
, were — (1) helievahilitx. (2) taste- 
'ness. (3) copy line. (4) demon- 
.ation. (5) identification, (6l en- 
tair.ment. (7) impact, as well as 
i technical excellence. 
[! Of 83 product category and special 
ation winners. 36 (43%) relied 
iportantlv upon a humorous or en- 
.rtaining approach. Of the Top 250 
osen by the Council for screening 
'iring the 18-20 May festival, 92 
!7'< i relied on humor as a basic 
•ncept in selling. Although the 
dges created a Special Citation for 
ntertainment Values lit went to the 
rnie Kovacs campaign for Dutch 
laster Cigars I in order to reduce 
amor as an overly-influential factor 
» the general appraisal, the enter- 
lining approach was not to be de- 
ied. 

| From a technique standpoint, even 
jiore obvious was the preponderance 
mong the winners of the "live ae- 
on" situation and demonstration ap- 
roach as opposed to pure animation. 
)f the Top 250. no less than 15(1 
60' i i employed real people, or pets. 
nd actual demonstrations of the 
>roduet in use. The percentage rose 
lightlv to 06' < among the winners. 
vhere 55 of the 83 relied on cinema- 
ography and a direct presentation. 

Generally, animation has run off 
vith whatever competitions there 
vere in the past t New York & Chi- 
ago Art Director Clubs, Hollywood 
\d Club, etc. i because of general 
Drientation toward technique. How- 
ever, with the judges of this adver- 
tising-oriented festival looking for 
''selling ads."" over and above tech- 
nique, the incidence of pure anima- 
tion among the Top 250 I 66 account- 
ing for 26 r r l and the Award Win- 
ners il8 accounting for 22 r r i was 
surprisingh lower. 

To be sure, animation wa~ em- 
ployed outstandingly in many in- 
stances — particularly in the Pet Food. 
Consumer Service. Public Service, 8- 
10 Second I.D.. Billboard, and Meal 



1 SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



Product categories. Certainly, the 
"Bert \ Harr\" school of animated 
character identification held forth im- 
portantly in the Beers & Wines area 
— what with "Burgie" Burgermeister, 
Utica Club's "Dooley and Schultz"' 
animated mugs, and Hamm's Bears 
among the favorites. 

And yet of the 14 finalists for this 
category in the Top 250. 12 util- 
ized "live action"" and not animation. 
The Budweiser, Schaefer and Schlitz 
campaigns, which employed real peo- 
ple in situation playlets wherein the\ 
used the product, were greatly liked. 
Of course the winner of this cate- 
gory. Martini & Rossi's 20-second 
commercial for its imported ver- 
mouth, was a little gem. which com- 
bined cinematography, humor, voice 
track and scoring, to overcome the 
powerful bids of no less than 108 
competitors. 

Last year's "hot" technique — 
"squeeze motion," or animated still 
photos to a lively musical or voice 
tempo — had little charm for the 
judges. They felt the device had been 
overworked. Onl\ five examples were 
selected for the Top 250. Still and 
all. they gave several top awards to 
commercials employing the technique 
and one Special Citation for Visual 
Effects — to Johnson & Johnson's 
Band-Aid "Patches"' entr\ . 

Stop Motion, involving painstaking 
frame-bv-frame photography to ani- 
mate objects, was appreciated for 
craftsmanship, but not as much as in 
the past. Xabisco's "Eggs. Eggs. 
Eggs"' commercial, which won a 
Runner-up Award in the Baked Goods 
category, was a refreshing adaptation 
of one of the European commercials 
that Harry Wa\ ne McMahan brought 
back from last \ear"s International 
Ad Film Festival. 

Puppets, always in a greatly ad- 
mired minority, had five representa- 
tives in the Top 250, including the 
offbeat Wilkins Coffee I.D.'s. which 
won the Runner-up Award in that 
category. 

Color— not a factor in the judging, 
which was by product category rather 
than technique, was employed by six 




NORTHWEST Orient Airline spots * 

ter Keaton topped Travel category. 43% of 

winners relied on humor, 37% of Top 250. 




THIS Stan Freberg-Playhouse spot for Kai 
Foil won Paper & Wraps category. Of winn 
only 22% were animated, 66% live act 



NON-VERBAL commercials, relying on pic- 
ture and track, won eight awards. This Chev- 
rolet spot was Best in Automobile category. 




of ili< Ward \\ inner-, bul <>iil\ bj 
20 of the Top 250. Twelve of that 
number were found in the lush auto- 
mobile model introduction commer- 
cials. 

In. reasingl) important in the esti- 
mation of tin- judges »a- the effec- 
tive use of illicit an<l Bound tracks to 

i if. iii- the desired \ iewer n <l. 

I bej gave three Special Citations to 
undent ore ilii- respect one t" Mer- 



cury's "Ballad," whose track runs the 
gamut of big choral and orchestra 
effects; one to General Foods' 
"Clown" spot for Tang, which relies 
strictlj on pantomime and musical 
scoring; one to Ipana's "Little GirL" 
which utilizes the ''Hexa . . . Hexa 
. . . Hexachloraphine" jingle. 

Ml in all. 449? of the winners em- 
ploj ed cither choral or jingle I 17*/£ ), 
or orchestral scoring i20 r r I. or sig- 



nificant sounds {7% I to reg 
their message. Of the Top 250. s 
84 commercials 1 33 % ) used tl 
sound and music tracks to effect. 
One side note is pointed up by 
fact that all eight of the Top 
which employed "non-verbal c 
munication" won Best of Categ«: 
Runner-Lp or Honorable Ment 
honors as well. The effect of re< 
screenings of European commert 



1 

TECHNIQUES USED IN TOP 250 COMMERCIALS BROK 

Category Live Action Animation Combined Stop Motion* Squeeze Special I 





II TOMOBILES 


11 


3 


2 




1 






AUTO ACCESSORIES 


5 


1 










APPAREL 


9 


1 




1 




3 


APPLIANCES 


5 


1 






1 


2 


B IKED (OODS 


2 


2 


1 


3 




2 


BEERS & WISES 


10 


3 






1 


4 


BREAKFAST CEREALS 


4 


3 




2 




1 


CIGARETTES-CIGARS 


7 


3 








2 1 


COFFEES & TEAS 


4 




1 


2 


1 


1 


CONSUMER SERVICE 


7 


4 








3 


COSMETICS, TOILETRIES 


21 




1 






6 i 


DAIRY PRODUCTS 


4 


1 


1 






1 


BILLBOARDS. OP, CLOSINGS 


2 


3 








4 


GASOLINES & OILS 


2 


4 








1 


HOI SEIIOLD CLEANSERS 


5 


3 








" 


HOME FURNISHINGS 


8 


2 




1 




1 


l\STITUTIONALS 


10 


3 






1 


1 


n BLIC SERVICE 


1 


3 




1 






JEWELRY, SPORTS, TOYS 


5 




1 






1 


ML M PRODUCTS 


1 


5 




1 


1 


1 




/' iPER & WR \VS 


4 


2 








1 


1 


I'LL FOODS 


2 


5 




1 








I'll ARM UFA LICALS 


3 


1 








2 1 




PREP IRED FOODS 


12 


3 








3 1 




SOFT DRI\KS 


3 


3 








2 I 




IK 11 // 


3 










1 1 


B-IO SL( . I.D.'s 




7 




2 




1 




150 

(60%) 


66 

(26%) 


7 
(3%) 


14 

(6%) 


6 

(2%) 


44 ] 

(18%| 


( 1 iSSICS 


8 


13 




2 




4 ] 




■ 






s Non-verbal: 1 in Au 


tomoblles, l .n Be 


rs, 1 in Cereals, 2 


in Cigarel a 



ich rely more on the picture than 
■ copy for universality is readily ap- 
rent in Chevrolet's "Family Shop- 
lg Tour," Kellogg's "Sounds of 
■ting," Budweiser's "Surprise 
rt\."" the Dreyfus Fund's "Lion In 
ie Street." the Ernie Kovacs video 
)ed spots for Dutch Master, Stand- 
d Oil of California's "Kid In Car," 
d Texize Cleanser's "Shoe Shine 
>y" — all of which won awards. 



Perhaps the most unexpectedly 
strong showing, from a technique 
standpoint, was that achieved by the 
video tape industry. There were 83 
original entries on video tape, sub- 
mitted by 10 production companies 
or their clients. Of this number, no 
less than 31 were picked for the Top 
250 and 12 won product category* 
Awards or Special Citations in addi- 
tion to the three Citations made ex- 



OWN 

Tape 


BY 

Color 


PRODUCT 

Humor Demo 


CATEGORIES 

Trackt Soundst 


1 


12 


7 


12 


6 


1 


| 1 


2 


2 


6 


2 




i 2 


] 


1 


8 


3 




S 2 


1 


3 


3 


2 


1 


. 1 




3 


3 


4 




1 1 




4 


7 


7 




i 1 




5 


1 


1 


1 


2 




3 


3 


4 




1 




1 


3 


5 


1 


3 ' 


2 


4 


2 


2 




2 


1 


4 


9 


5 




3 




3 


3 


3 






2 


1 


1 


3 








4 


2 


2 








3 


4 


3 


1 


! i 




4 


4 


4 




3 


1 


1 


3 


2 








2 


2 


4 




1 




4 


3 


1 


1 






4 


1 


5 




2 




1 


5 


1 








5 


2 


2 








1 


2 


2 


1 


4 




6 


6 


3 


1 






6 


3 


4 








3 


2 


2 


.. 






7 


1 


2 




31 

(12%) 


22 

(9%) 


92 

(37%) 


99 

(40% 


84 

) (33%) 


8 

(3%) 




1 


8 


10 


12 


2 


5»rs. 1 in Consume 




i Gasolines. 1 in Home Furnishings & Maintenance. 





pressly for Video Tape Production. 

The tape technique seemed partic- 
ularly effective in the area of live 
demonstrations. The "Jam Coffee 
Braid" commercial for Fleischmann's 
Yeast I by Elliot, Unger & Elliot for 
J. Walter Thompson I won not onlj 
Best of Category for Baked Goods, 
but also a Special Citation for Prod- 
uct Demonstration. Delco's "Five 
Car Salute" I by NBC for Campbell- 
Ewald) won Best of the Auto Ac- 
cessory category as well as the top 
Video Tape Production Citation. CBS 
TV Production Sales had the top and 
the honorable mention commercials 
I both for G.E. through BBDO I in 
the Institutional category, while the 
Westclox "Grand Central" commer- 
cial produced by NTA Telestudios for 
BBDO, won two Runner-up Awards 
— one in the Jewelry category and 
one for Video Tape Production. 

The video tape entries and award? 
were not restricted to top New York 
producers either. The Runner-up 
Award Winner in the Local Market 
judging went to KGGM-TV's institu- 
tional commercial for the Albuquer- 
que National Bank through the Ward 
Hicks agency, also of Albuquerque. 
In the top 250 was a Cains Coffee 
spot produced by WKY-TV for the 
Lowe Runkle agency, both of Okla- 
homa City. Roger Price's witty com- 
mercial for the Metropolitan Dairv 
Institute of New York, produced ]>\ 
Tex McCrary's organization, also was 
a member of the select 150. 

Any analysis of trends in technique 
would not be complete with an ap- 
praisal of the 25 Commercial Classics 
that were selected from 135 entries 
on the basis of memorabilitv. longevity 
of use, and influence upon later tech- 
niques. The 25 selected at this first 
festival will form the nucleus that will 
be augmented annually to form a 
Commercials Hall of Fame. 

Several things can be noted for the 
record: Ranging from 1948 to 1959 
in age, the oldest selections were 
Lucky Strike's "Square Dance" and 
the Ajax "Pixies." They brought 
theatrical stop motion and animation 
techniques, respectively, to television. 

As a group the Classics leaned to- 
ward animation as a technique (13 of 
the 25 I . with live action photographv 
accounting for eight, and stop motion 
for one, puppets for another, and a 
(Please turn to page 69) 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



RADIO BASICs/jULY 

Facts & figures about radio today 

1. CURRENT RADIO DIMENSIONS 



Radio homes index 



Radio station index 



1960 1959 

M 









End of June 


1960 












Stations CPs not 


New station 
requests 


New station 
bids in hearing* 


Am 
Fm 




1 


3.483 1 98 
741 | 171 

End of June 


I ^4 

1959 


1 


197 
44 


Am 
Fm 




1 


3.377 1 123 
622 1 147 


516 
49 


1 


155 
21 


Sou re- 




mihh 


report., commercial station 


. 'May. each yea 







Radio set index 


Set 

location 


1960 1959 


Home 
Auto 


106,007,095 98,300,000 
40,387,449 37,900,000 


Public 
places 


10,000,000* lO.OOO.OOO* 


Total 


156,394,544 146,200,000 


Source: B 


AB. 1 Jin. 1960. 1 Jan. 1959. 



Radio set sales index 



Home 
Auto 



548.322 
463.165 



400.882 

476.222 



2.480.684 
2.262.390 



5,901.691 4.743.076 

Source: Electronic Industries Assn. Home figures are ettimated retail aales, auto 
figures are factory production. These figures are of U.S. production only. Radios in 
phonographs add another 15-2056 to the home sales figures. 



2. CURRENT SET PATTERNS 



Figures, which refer to 
pe i < 'Hi age <>f radio 
homes, point up trend of 
Bet location away from 
lis in;: room. The) BhoM 
that practical!] all I .S. 

lailici homes now have 

->-t- iii the bedroom with 
kitchens in Becond place 



DISTRIBUTION OF HOME RADIO SETS 

LOCATION PERCENT 


| Bedrooms with radio 






84 


Kitchens 






71 


Living rooms 






36 


Homes with portables 






16 


Homes with outside (includes 


autos) 




53 








j 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 




Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 
sponsor • 18 JULY 1960 



2,216,600 consumers populate 
the 75-mile radius around 
Charlotte ... a population 
larger than the comparable 
area served by Indianapolis. 



Represented Nationally by CBS Radio Spot Sales 

45 




single station 

market 

in 

America! 



WTHI-TV is a single 
station market of 
217,400 TV homes. 



An advertising dollar 

on WTHI-TV delivers 

more TV homes than 

many dollars in a 

multiple station 

market. 





WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL lO 

TERRE HAUTE, 

INDIANA 






National and regional bj 
in work now or recently compter. \\i 



POT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

General Foods Corp., Maxwell House Div.. Hoboken: Camp 

for Instant .Maxwell House coffee starts this month in about 75 : 

kets. Fringe night minutes are being scheduled through Septen 

Buyer: Grace Porterfield. Agency: Benton & Bowles. 

Formfit Co., Chicago: A number of top markets will get schec 

for its Sleex girdle promotion in the fall. Day and night minutes 

gin early September for 13 wed _ lacFarland. Aveyard 1 

Co.. Chicago. 

Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati: Activity continues on L -i 

Hines cake mixes with selected markets being bought Day m 

schedules on the angel food cake start third week of this montl 

run through the P&G contract year. B. '.lien. Agencvl 

Compton Adv.. New York. 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Hanson. Ma-:;.- Planning a 13J 

week fall campaign for its cranberry products, to create a morj 

favorable market after last year's bad publicity. Schedules of <kjj 

minutes and prime 20"s start late September and early October! IP 

Buver: Hope Martinez. Agency: BBDO. New York. 

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis: Campaign for Red Band floe 

begins 17 July in southern markets. Schedules are for five weeks 

day and night minutes. Buyer: Bob Fitzgerald. Agency: Dancer 

Fitzgerald-Sample. New York. 

Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati: Going into the top markets for] 

Lilt Home Permanent starting 25 July. Night minutes are being sti 

through the PikG contract year. Buyer: Dorothy Houghey. Agenct 1 

Grey Advertising Agency. New "l ork. 

Quaker City Chocolate & Confectionery Co., Philadelphia: Kid] 

show schedules for the fall will be bought for its Good & Plenty 

licorice candy. Thirteen-week placements starting in September will 

be in Boston. Baltimore. Chicago. Cincinnati. Cleveland, Columbus. 

Milwaukee. Philadelphia. Pittsburgh. Detroit. Los .Angeles. New York, 

Syracuse and New Haven. Bu\er: Elmer Jaspen. Agency: Bauer k 

Tripp. Inc.. Philadelphia. 



RADIO BUYS 

Fels & Co., Philadelphia: Schedules on Instant Fels-Naptha. Gen 
Fels and Fels-Naptha All Purpose Cleaner begin this month for 
alternate weeks or 20 consecutive weeks, depending on market. T 
-tations per market are being used. 10-40 day minute sp 
per week per station, in 105 markets. Additional schedules start 
August and run through 25 November. Buyer: Alan B 
Aitkin-Kvnett Co.. Philadelphia. 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co 

ules are being lined up in tbe top markets for LAM Filters. Trai 
minutes will start this month. 20-25 spots per week per market. Bi 
er: Fred Hawkins. Agency: Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. New \ 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY I960 



SEE FOR YOURSELF WHY ONE 
STATION DOES AROUND 80 OF THE 
LOCAL BUSINESS IN DES MOINES 



Most Watched Station . . . KRNT-TV! 

Most Believable Personalities . . . KRNT-TV! 

Most Believable Station . . . KRNT-TV! 

Most People Would Prefer KRNT-TV Personalities As Neighbors! 

Most People Vote KRNT-TV 

The Station Doing the Most to Promote Worthwhile 

Public Service Projects! 

Wonderful Ratings on KRNT-TV! 

The Points Where Your Distribution is Concentrated 

Wonderful Ratings on KRNT-TV! 

The Points Where the Points Count the Most for You. 

See for yOlirSelf the list of local accounts whose 
strategy is to use this station almost exclusively. It reads 
like who's who in many classifications — Foods and Financial 
Institutions, to name a couple. 



Central 


urveys 


Study 


(Feb. 


1960) 


Ask 


Katz 


for the 




facts 


N 


ielsen 


(Feb. 


1960) 


Ask 


Katz 




ARB 


(Mar. 


1960) 


Ask 


Katz 


Ask 


Katz 




about 


Central 


Iowa 


Advertisers 



>ee tOr yOUrSelf the new, tried and proved power concept of these companies of con- 
:entrating on one station. See for yourself how they use this station to get distribution and pro- 
luce sales. The bold concept used by these companies discards the old strategy of a little here, a 
ittle there, a little some place else. Old strategy oftentimes results in a dissipation of efforts. 

See fOr yOUrSelf why KRNT-TV regularly carries around 80% of the local business. 
Jee for yourself that this station is a big enough sales tool to win your sales battle if it's used in a 
oig enough way. 



KRNT-TV 

DES MOINES 

A COWLES STATION 



18 .illy 1960 



47 



With the stress on public affairs, SPONSOR ASKS: 

What public service programs 

evoke strong audience e s 



Paul Friel 

W - ftl \\ 1!/ art- of the opinion that 
two t\prs of public >< 

- and saturation 

\ e in attaining 

• pro- 

s. it is 

. - receive 

- - and stud\ as 
_ for product 
•r to determine the 
- 
graming. there are three basic rule? 
\ in <>ur analysis: 1 I Deter- 
mine the need : 2 1 decide on the 
frame the BM SE _ 

W HZ recentfj sched- 
uled a saturation public service an- 
■mpaign on behalf of 
the Big Brother \ssociation of Boston 
v*hi» was recruiting new members. 
The appeal was aimed specifically at 
ale audience, and announce- 
ments were scheduled even hour to 
stimulate the maximum number of 
male listeners to respond. T: - 
not an appeal for funds, but an appeal 
for time. Members who were accepted 
into the Big Brother Association 
would ha\e to de\ ote four or five 
hours each week to advise, guide, and 
Id the characters of fatherless 
- f fi\e and 17 



:> 



Programs based 
i need 

> show- 
manship and 



The 

ation, which 

A ' - tod that 

public 



9eof oni strong qual- 
ified air personalities who have ac- 
quired listeners. Also radio has an 
advantage o\er television in that the 
medium reaches out-of-home !.-: 
In the New England area alone there 

• r three million car radios. 
In planning our documents: 

paigns. we do not program in hit-or- 
miss fashion. Through the coordina- 
tion of both promotion and publicitv 
and a flair for showmanship, we stim- 
ulate public response prior to the 
broadcast. In the case of our hour- 
long documentary. Pom i 

. .'. a frank and factual 
news report, written by WBZ radio 
news director ferry Landay. on por- 
nography, indecent literature, photo- 
graphs, the corrupters who produce 
and sell it. and the people it corrupts, 
we scheduled a preview in Boston for 
civil and government leaders, mem- 
bers of women's clubs, and the press. 
Through their enthusiasm and influ- 
ence we realized incalcuable reaction 
from other groups. Our listeners were 
aware that we were scheduling this 
informative report, and WBZ 
credited bv the office of the Middlesex 
Count v District Attornev for bringing 
to light several distribution outlets for 

• literature and photographs. 
The public was alerted bv this broad- 
cast, and through WBZ"s appeal they 
telephoned information which led to 
police investigations. We can judge 
from telephone calls from listeners 
and hundreds of letters the effective- 
ness of our public service program- 
ing, and such response has been 
gratifx ing. 

In order to achieve the greatest 
public response for public service pro- 
graming, the ingredients of proper 
planning and staging, showmanship. 
and creativity are essential and this 
working formula will guarantee im- 
pact and reaction. 

Doug Holcomb 

'I TV. Scrmntvn- 

- the dav of its founding. 



WDAl-TY has. in its niam-fac 

■:formanL pal . 
entertainer, held first and fona 
the co: 

strume: I - e to tbe i 

munit\ . 

- :rsponsibilil\ to 
one and a half million people in 
tral and northeastern I 
^DAl-T\ endr. 

addition to thousands of announce- 
ments b. • - _ nations, ia- 






station support. 
me slots 

end - ■.■'■.'sure 



stitutions and worthy cans • • 

f cultural, informational 
and public value. 

What type of public service pro- 
graming to present and i 
accepted b\ the public is an < 
difficult and doubtful q a 

9sen the obligation we 

s 

the highest regard for service to tbe 
community. 

To us. public service has always 
been more of a challenge than an 
obligation. 

On 30 Max. 1 
— WDAl" programed ii 
ning time. " a } ublic serv- 

ice program in cooperation with tar 
State of Pennsylvania Departments of 
Health. Public Instruct i 
Defense. 

The program opened ■ 
pearance of a child wb - 
been saved just two dax - 
by "insufflation."' A 13-n 

:'-:e program ooverc 
tion and - : insufflation 

' mouth-to-mouth respiration). 4 
panel d^ .-- ed featuring 

comments bv Pennsyrrar i 
cials. 

The presentation, und"- 
_ - 



• 18 JULY I960 j 



• 



esponse 



senthal. has received the plaudits 
tv editors and columnists through- 

the area. 

Since the program was aired, re- 
ests for insufflation cards have been 
uring in from all parts of the East, 
part of the over-all promotion of 
; show these same cards were 
tiled to all account executives and 
;dia directors in principal markets 
the country. Regional service or- 
nizations have requested a repeat 
the program and the wallet-size 
rds to distribute to their member- 
ips. 

This project was a station — call it 
promotion or a program — activity 
ilored to the current needs of the 
immunity in behalf of a timelv and 
forthy cause. And from public re- 
lonse similar programs would be 
,[uallv acceptable. 

Harry Nevik, president and general 

manager, WL1B, New York 
Our public service news program- 
g as a whole and one program in 
irticular. The one program that 
ands out in over-all acceptance and 
mularih with WLIETs Xegro audi- 
lce in metropolitan New York is a 
ogram which also happens to be 
le of the oldest on our air. 
' It is the Editors Speak, which has 
the air for more than seven 





jears. The program is a panel-type 
jiscussion featuring each week sev- 
/ral guest editors from various pub- 
cations who air their views on cur- 
Jentnews events of interest toWLIB's 
< uge Xegro audience. 
i This program has become the bell- 
wether of community feeling in our 
rea and our audiences have indi- 
i Please turn to fxige 51) 



KNOE-LAND' 



I 40,355,000 
$ 299,539,000 

$ 148,789,000 
$1,286,255,000 



(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1,520,100 Drug Sales 

Households 423,600 Automotive Sales 

Consumer Spendable Income General Merchandise 

$1,761,169,000 Total Retail Sales 
Food Sales $ 300,486,000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 79.1% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to March 1960 ARB we average 79.1% share of audience from 
9 a.m. to midnight, 7 days a week. 

CBS • ABC 
A James A. Noe Station 
Channel 8 Represented by 

Monroe, Louisiana H -R Television, Inc. 

Photo: "Greenv^ille Mill, Division of Mohasco Industries, Inc.", Greenville, Mississippi, Mann- 



KNOE-TV 



factw 



of the fi,u 







• PONSOR 



18 july 1960 



TV TALENT 

i Continued Irani , 

on .i program. \nd after the decision 
i- made, there are constant script 
checks, storj conferences, supervision 
of film Bhooting or on-stage rehear- 
sals and performance, integration and 
coordination <>f the commercials and 
the uncountable details of a finished 
tele> i-i..n perfoi mance. 

I lie < o-t ol maintaining a t\ de- 
partment i- exhorbitant, and the prof- 
it- low in consideration of the output 
and service involved. This is what 
most admen «a\ . \nd here's what 
Fred Gamble, \\ president, has to 
-a\ on tlie subject: 

"'I once heard a man who might 
yarded as an advertising expert 
b) outsider- explain to a friend that 
t\ i- a l grav) train" for agencies be- 
cause it produces "fat" commissions 
while requiring less work than other 
media. This i> an idea that has gained 
some currency. Yet one ad executive 
recently described tv as an 'ogre." ex- 
plaining if he could convert tv bill- 
ings to other media annual earnings 
for the agenc) would skvrocket. An- 
other agencx executive estimated that 
t\ required fixe man-hours of work 
for even man-hour put into a similar 
budget in other media. 'The charge 
that tv provides a quick route to 
riches for advertising agencies is 
transparent!) false."" 

One agenc\ man. in discussing so- 
called "package" shows, charges that 
the word package "implies that the 
program comes in a neat bundle and 
the agencv simplj wishes it well and 
sends it on it- way." But. he adds. 
I :< \ contributes enormousK to 
such a buy. and the first contribution 
is a large background of knowledge 
about all kinds of t\ programing as 
well as advertising to the package 
produ< ers. 

More specifically, the agencv does 
the following after buying a "pack- 
work with the packager to 
develop the concept of the program. 
sometimes even starting with the pro- 
file: reserve the right to ap- 
prove all major casting and script ma- 
>• ad all scripts and make sug. 
e> isions when thev are 
I foi dramatic purposes or in 
ill stu- 
tnd make suggestions 
-nt. cover re- 
sh contact with 
ith all participants of 
ducer, actors. 



writers, director and technicians! to 
make 3ure that the client gets the 
best possible results for his great 
expenditure." 

S) I'rolick. FRC&H. recalls the co- 
operative work which accompanied 
production of Navy Log (for I . S. 
Rubber) bj an independent producer. 
"Our agencyman, the show produc- 
er, a representative of the Navy, an- 
other from ABC TV network and two 
other people met regularlv to discuss 
subject matter far in advance of the 
script being written. We followed 
each step all the way through, and. as 
a result, we never had to make anv 
major changes because we were in 
agreement throughout."' 

He and his agency follow the same 
creative participation patterns of the 
agency giants, although his staff is 
structured differently and is smaller. 
He heads two groups of people — pro- 
gramers and writer-producer staffers 
— who work laterally in both areas so 
that all 16 persons are conversant 
with each area of activity. 

This contrasts with McCann. with 
29 men at the executive level, one of 
whom is executive v. p. and two. sen- 
ior v.p.'s. The major agencies have be- 
stowed vice presidential ribbons on 
their key tv people, adding to their 
prestige in dealing with clients as well 
as with suppliers. One adman com- 
mented, wryly, "the networks and 
program suppliers are reluctant to 
deal with anyone who doesn't have 
his v. p. stripes and who perhaps 
can"t. therefore, make a decision or 
a recommendation." 

The djsmand for the "stars"' of ad- 
vertising, reports Raymond F. Sulli- 
van, chairman. SSC&B to the 4A's 
Fred Gamble, is bound to grow as 
advertising volume increases. He 
agrees with his colleagues that the 
competition for well-qualified people 
will intensify, and that many of these 
people specialize in the broadcast 
field. 

The heavy-up in tv people, so 
marked in some shops, is notable for 
it- absence in still others. One 
medium-sized agency, with an esti- 
mated $6 million in broadcast bill- 
ing-, sen ices these accounts with onl\ 
four people. That's why the depart- 
ment director recently joined another 
agency, because his management 
"skimmed off that 15 r r gravv and 
refused to give me more people."" In 
contrast Madison Ave. reports that 
OgHvy, Benson ^ Mather, which bags 



the Shell account next December, t 
hire another 100 people, many 
whom will work in broadcast. 

More than a few big agencies h 
fallen into what one v.p. calls 
"appalling trap" of hiring inept p 
pie at very high salaries to head 
units. He sees "too many agi 
officers falling for the 'show busim 
experience line and hiring somen 
who knows nothing about televisi 
as an advertising medium." 

He and his admen colleagues str< 
the urgent need for the rounded 
pro. Frolicks definition is "some© 
who knows that the show itself is n 
the thing, but that show business w: 
a purpose is!" Terrv Clvne savs tl 
magic combination calls for "e 
ence. judgment and ability." 
an ANA survev two years age 
Frey report I indicates that ad 
ing managers of client companies ai 
interested in two characteristics c 
people and of agencies: the know 
edge of markets, products and advei 
tising and the abilitv to create. i'Thi 
same report summarizes views o 
agency compensation for agencx 
originated and agencv-bought show; 
See chart, page 38.) 

This experience, judgment am 
abilitv come into plav even when thi 
client doesn't buy programing. Botfi 
Frolick and Hunter pointed out ti 
sponsor that tv executives need b 
keep on top of all developments, 
whether clients buv shows or not 
"Almost even client is interested ii 
tv programing and a prospect for it.' 
says Hunter. "There's no lessened ef 
fort in keeping up with what's new, 
screening all pilots and in keeping 
clients briefed." 

There are. of course, advertiser 
who resent paying 15' '< commission] 
on programs which are not agency 
originated. But most of them, sav 
admen, realize that the so-called tv 
commissions are plowed back into al 
areas of agencv activity: research 
marketing, planning, copy. Clyne sug 
gests that McCann's revenue breaks 
down this way: Between \ r > and 2"^ 
of the 15' 'i commission becomes 
agencv profit, some $2 million on a 
broadcast gross of S100 million. An- 
other \' '< generally — $1.2 million — 
goes to operating expenses of the tele- 
vision productions division. This 
therefore leaves between Sll and $12 
million which is diverted into other 
agency functions and which, agency- 
men believe, make for a better return 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



the client's investment. 

V significant number of advertis- 

and agencies have worked out a 

tually satisfactory commission- 

1 s fee arrangement for the tv de- 

•tment. The Frey report I again. 

> \ears old but relative to today's 

terns I shows that 38.9 r ^ of the ad 

; nagers of client companies re- 

rted compensation for agency-pro- 

"Iced shows on this basis and 26.3 r r 

T" packaged programs. 

■ The preferred technique, however, 

| the flat 15 r r commission, with 

>A r '( paying this for packaged 

rows and 32.0 r r for agency-pro- 

ced programs. 

The trend, admen told sponsor, is 
r the bigger-budget clients — who 
e more sophisticated in advertising 
■eds and techniques — to be the most 
tiling to pay premium fees or fees 
us the fixed 15% commission to 
b rencies on their tv activities. 

But medium and smaller advertis- 
es are beginning to climb on this 
'ime bandwagon. One reason: it's 
unusual these days for a fast- 
lrnover, slim-markup item to be ad- 
tertised on a per-unit basis with tele- 
vision at a higher cost than the actual 
manufacture. A drug item which 
bsts the producer 20 cents per unit 
hay cost him an equal amount in 
Revision advertising. 

This is why the good judgment of 
he men in charge of these television 
udgets is a much sought after com- 
noditv. bearing a high price tag. 
Jut progressive agency men realize 
he field is fast being tapped and that 
.nost of the newcomers to high-eche- 
on tv department ranks will have to 
develop from within the agency's own 
raining program. 

The monevbags agencies have car- 
"ied on this kind of training program 
for three or four years, and their 
I'juniors" are now being moved up- 
ward toward the "senior" classifica- 
tion. Money is only one of the lures, 
however. Trainees with interest in 
and aptitude for television program- 
ing and production are interested 
also in associating with a manage- 
ment which offers them creative lee- 
way and room to expand their men- 
tal horizons as well as their financial 
ones. 

Those agencies across the country 
which are offering both the tangible 
and intangible pluses are the ones 
attracting the best talent with the 
most potential. f^ 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 49 I 
cated time and again that they feel 
the program is fulfilling an excep- 
tionally fine public service need. 

The program is moderated by our 
news director George W. Goodman 
and the guests are invited from such 
newspapers and magazines as Ebony, 
the Amsterdam News, let, Pittsburgh 
Courier, New York Post and other 
important periodicals. 

The program offers over a period 
of time, complete discussion on am 
and all phases of community life, wel- 
fare, health and civic aims as they 
pertain to New York's Negro popula- 
tion. 

The programs are free-wheeling, 
no-holds-barred discussions with the 
principle objective being to present 
all sides of the subject matter to the 
audience. The editors specifically 
bring to light points that may have 
been overlooked in some stories, and. 
even with the most controversial sub- 
jects, use their editorial experience to 
spotlight all angles of a given news 
story and its importance to the Negro 
community. The variety of editorial 



viewpoints presented at these dis< US- 
sions almost guarantees interesting 
and factual news reporting. Because 
of this the program has become in- 
creasingly more important to the 
Negro audience. WLIB serves and it 
has enjoyed a stead ih increasing 
audience over the years. At present, 
it is one of our best-known and most 
discussed public service offerings. 

One of the main reasons for this 
interest is the liberal use of important 
guests on the program. Guests who 
have participated in many of the 
newsworthy and frequently history 
making events that have been part of 
the Negro heritage and who can offer 
their own experience as editorial dis- 
cussion matter for the Editors Speak 
panel. These guests have included 
leading politicians and diplomats 
from Africa, student participants in 
the Southern sit-in strikes, leading 
Congressmen from both sides of the 
recent civil rights debates and man\ 
others with important news stories to 
offer for discussion. 

An example of this radio-journal- 
ism occurred during the last national 
I Please turn to page 59 i 



In Joplin, Missouri E 




S *C\ YOUR 
i \ I PRODUCT'S 
V \ 7 BEST 



WSTV-TV ! 

CHANNEL 9 | 

Steubenville -Wheeling 




WRGP-TV C 

CHANNEL. 3 

'Chattanooga, Tennessee 



j WRDW-TV 

CHANNEL 12 

Augusta, Georgia 



WBOY-TV 

CHANNEL. 12 

Clarksburg, West Virginia 



28% taller and 29% 
powerful- tells and sells 152,000 TV 
homes who spend 750 million annually. 
For Rates and Avails 

• IN JOPLIN: D. T. Knight, MA 3-7260 

• IN NEW YORK: lee Gaynor, OX 7-0306 

Exclusive Shopper Topper Merchandising 



K0DE-TV 

CHANNEL 12 
Joplin, Missouri 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



TELEPULSE ■ 


1 RATINGS: 


TOP SP J 


Top 10 shows in 10 or more 
markets. Period: 19 March- 


National 


7- STATION- 
MARKETS 


5-STA. 
MARKET 


4-STATION MARKETS 




15 April, 1960 

TITLE. SYNDICATE, TYPE 


NY. L.A. 


Biattli 


Chicago Detroit Mint) Is. St. Louis San Fran. Wash. 


Atlanta Bait. Boston Bui 


Sea Hunt 

zivua (Adventure) 


19.7 


23.3 14.7 


25.3 


19.0 30.9 24.4 18.4 26.5 

9:30pm 10:30pm 9:30pm 10:00pn 


12.5 


14.8 


10.0 17.4 16 I 

wbal-tv whdh-tv wkv, x 
10:30pm 10:30pm 10:0"t: 1 


Huckleberry Hound 

SCREEN OEMS 1 ( iartOOIl ' 


18.7 


11.3 17.7 

wplx-tv kttv 
8 30pm : :00pm 


21.3 


12.3 16.9 18.9 10.0 19.3 

wgn-tv cklw-tv wrco-tv kplr-tv ktvu-tv 
6:30pm 7:00pm 6:30pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 


18.5 


13.3 

6:00pm 


15.7 


Mike Hammer 
"» (Mystery) 


17.8 


3.2 13.2 

10:00pm 10:30pm 


17.0 

10:30pra 


14.3 17.2 

Hgn-tv ksd-tv 
9:30pm 10:00pm 


5.8 

in :30pm 


16.7 14* 

7:00pm 10 :; : 


Whirlybirds 

c"« (Adventure) 


17.2 


4.2 4.7 

7 :00pm 7 :30pm 


25.8 


9.8 7.4 11.7 14.4 

9:00pm 11:00pm 6:00pm 10:00pm 


14.9 


22.8 


21.0 24.: ' 

7:00pm 7 :00:J P 


Manhunt 

screen oems (Mystery) 


17.1 


4.1 14.1 

wnew-tv krea-tv 
6 :00pm 7 :00pm 


24.3 

7:00pm 


10.5 13.9 14.0 19.8 

wgn-tv Hjhk-tv kstp-tv kron-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 6:30pm 


10.2 

10:30pm 


16.8 

7 :00pm 


13.5 17.2 


Quick Draw McCraw 

screen gems (Cartoon) 


16.9 


10.8 11.9 

wpbt-tv kttr 
•i 30pm 7 00pm 


17.0 

6:00pm 


22.5 17.2 9.5 24.3 

6:00pm 6:30pm 3:00pm 6:30pm 


16.9 


10.0 


13.5 

6:30pm 


Lock-Up 

I'v (Drama) 


16.7 


6.6 15.2 

7:00pm 7:00pm 


15.8 

10:00pm 


10.8 10.2 19.5 20.4 19.0 

wnbq-tv wjbk-tT kstp-tv ksd-tv kron-tv 
10:0Opm 7:30pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 


19.0 

10:30pm 


9.5 17.2 14.5 

vbal-tv whdh-tv wrr ti 
7:00pm 10:30pm 10 :30p0 


Grand Jury 

nt a (Drama) 


16.9 


9.9 14.2 

7 :30pm 6 :30pm 




9.3 20.5 11.7 

wnbq-tv weeo-tv fcsd-ti 
9:30pm 7:00pm 10:00pm 


16.0 

wlw-a 
10:30pm 


27.91 

10:3M 


Border Patrol 

cos (Adventure) 


16.4 


4.3 


5.8 


12.2 19.5 11.4 9.8 

Hwj-tv kstp-tv ksd-tv kron-tv 
7:00pm 9:30pm 10:00pm 10:00pm 


8.4 


17.0 

10:30pm 


24.3 24.5 23.4 

wjz-tv wbz-tT wkbw t 
5:30pm 7:00pm 10:30i>« 


U. S. Marshal 


16.3 


5.7 5.9 

0:0flpm 9:00pm 


3.3 

• : :3<>imi 


11.0 13.9 6.9 15.0 10.3 

wgn-tv wwj-tv wtcn-tv ksd-tv kgo-tv 
9:00pm 10:30pm 9:30pm 10:00pm 7:00pm 


13.7 


21.8 

10 :30pm 


26.2 


Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 ma 


kets 












Woody Woodpecker 


16.4 






15.0 

6 :30pm 


14.5 


14.8 

6:00pm 


Badge 714 

cnp (MysteryJ 


14.0 


4.8 2.9 

7:30pm 7:30pm 


5.3 


24.8 

10:30pm 


16.0 


12.3 

6:30pm 


Vikings 

u*a (Adventure) 


13.3 


5.8 4.6 


20.5 


13.8 18.9 


19.5 

wrr-tv 
7 MM 


Honeymooners 
c« (Comedy) 


13.2 


4.3 3.8 
8:00pm 10:30pm 




12.5 8.5 15.8 

6:30pm 9:00pm 6:00pm 


15.0 

7:00pm 


24.9 


Bold Ventures 

ziv-ua (Adventure) 


12.9 


15.8 8.4 


29.3 

8 30pm 


5.4 7.9 

7:00pm 9:30pm 


14.4 




Pony Express 
cnp ( \dventure) 


12.7 


9.4 




14.8 


10.2 

7 :30pm 


12.3 

6:30pm 


15.9 

10:30pn 


Decoy 

• (Mystery) 


12.5 


4.3 7.7 

«l>i\ -tv kttv 
i Ipm 9:80pm 




6.0 


16.8 12.4 

7:30pm 10:30pm 


State Trooper 
"" ' Adventure) 


12.4 


8.1 4.4 




10.3 17.4 

wgn-tv kstp-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 


8.2 


10.8 


22.0 17.0 

7:00pm 6:00p» 


Rendezvous 

CM (|), 


12.3 


4.9 

kabc-tT 


18.8 

7 "I l 


8.6 6.8 

7:00pm 


18.4 23.5 


Little Rascals 

iNTERST»Tt i Corned) > 


12.0 


5.6 13.8 

tvabc tv khj-tv 
6:00pm 7:00pm 




4.5 

■■ 30pm 

















'rol was used for Whirlybirds. 
' ' - and hr. length, telecast li 
5 April. 
Tl.ii should bo borne In mind when analyzing rating trends 



markets. Tho average rating is an unweighted averag 
e month to another I 



if individual market ratings listed abor< 

markets in which they are shown, tins is 
hit chart. Classification as to number of I 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 19'»( 



»PLM SHOWS 



TATION MARKETS 


2-STATION MARKETS 


* : A. Milw. 


New Or. 


Phlla. 


Birm. 


D**™ 


Pr»v. 


..8 24.8 

Ipm 9:30pm 


24.5 

9:30pm 


21.7 

i;:nopni 


27.3 


18.3 

10 :30pm 


18.5 

7:00pm 


'..3 




17.9 

7 :30pm 


29.3 


1 * > ,°, 


22.0 

9:30pm 


31.4 

l(l:3H|.m 


31.8 

whlo-tv 

8 :30pm 


» (J.3 22.3 


25.0 

9:30pm 


13.5 


30.0 

7:50pm 


18.8 


21.3 


11 1.8 24.5 

t ( 0pm 9:30pm 


29.0 

iv.lsu-tv 




25.0 

9 :30pm 


28.3 

wlw-d 




5.8 




10.5 

r. :00pm 


33.3 

«api-tv 


II 5.3 12.8 




19.2 

7:00pm 


30.3 

9:30]im 


25.8 

10:30pm 


16.8 

wjar-tv 


r S.8 16.3 

30pm 7:00iim 


23.2 


22.0 


20.5 

vvhio-tv 


: ).3 


34.8 


19.2 

wfll-ty 


24.8 

7:00pm 


'3.8 16.3 

:30pm 6:00pm 


18.0 

10:00pm 




31.8 

7:30pm 


21.8 


24.0 

10:30pm 






18.8 




19.2 

wwl-tv 

10:00pm 




26.5 


2.3 10.8 

un-tv wisn-tv 
1 :00pm fi :30pm 




16.3 17.3 

:30pm 10:l"ipnl 










13.9 




8.3 




13.4 

10;0llp„l 








26.0 


13-8 




4.9 






24.0 


i ■ 

















SPO T 

AND 

SPONSOR 

HAVE 

A LOT 

IN COMMON 

AND 

SIX 

OUT OF 

TEN 

COPIES OF 

SPONSOR 

GO TO 

AGENCIES 

AND 

ADVERTISERS 



jse"« own. Pulse determines number by measurin» which I 
|»lly received by homes In the metropolitan area of a given m 
lion itself may be outside Metropolitan area of the mark 



PONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 




NOW.. .real power for your Baton Rouge lineup 



Famous old "28" (UHF) retires August 1st after winning 
every laurel in his league (including 25 out of 26 national 
merchandising campaigns in which he competed). His 
replacement is a husky young slugger wearing a big red 
"9" (VHF). This "9" reaches all of "28's" loya! fans, 
PLUS a huge new bonus market. Now "9" serves 268,400 
homes in the Central Gulf Area. ..and gives first adequate 
TV coverage to more than 30,000 additional homes. 




TV Q BATON ROUGE 

CHANNEL 9 LOUISIANA® 

goes farther — se//s more — in one of 
the nation's fastest growing markets 

Channel 9 . . . first in TV in Baton Rouge ... is a 9-inning hustler that draws an all-time-record 
attendance of loyal fans. And what fans! Annual retail sales ($270,882,000) 77% above the 
Louisiana average and 45% above the U. S. average! Food sales ($53,187,000) 61% above 
the state, 19% above the national! Furniture/appliance/household sales ($17,851,000) 107% 
above Louisiana, 80% above the U. S.! 

Why not have "9" in your lineup right from the start! Call Blair TV Associates for a 
quick rundown. 



18 jlly 196( 



J 




Whafs happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



18 JULY I960 

Copyright IMO 
8P0N80R 

UBLICATIONS INC 



The new Complaints and Compliance Division was in the beefing-up process as 
$150,000 of new money became available to the FCC for hiring personnel. 

Although Sen. Warren Magnuson had originally stated that his own appropriations sub- 
committee hadn't voted a cent for the new division, the FCC money bill definitely provided for 
the watchdog group as it finally cleared Congress. 

Language in the bill as it cleared the Magnuson subcommittee warning the FCC against 
censorship, on the other hand, was amply borne out by "legislative history." Which simply 
means that all legislators agreed in debate that the money was not intended for, and 
couldn't be used for, censorship. 

This was small comfort to the industry, since censorship is apt to mean different things to 
different people. The FCC had contended from the beginning that it had no intention of get- 
ting anywhere near censorship. 

Consequently, the Commission goes quietly ahead with the new division, and plans for 
it have not been changed by admonitions from Magnuson or anybody else. 



The Commission, meanwhile, is wrestling with a declaration that it has legal 
power to insist that stations program somewhere near along lines of their promises 
when they secured their original licenses. 

There is little dispute among Commissioners about this over-all declaration. Complica- 
tions rise from the fact that a staff report urges an even stronger stand on programing. On 
the other hand, some commissioners want to hedge at least a little bit on the central theme, 
itself. 

Commissioners had promised the final word on programing before now. It appears with 
respect to this dispute, however, that the FCC might not even beat its August recess with the 
decision. 

Nor does the dispute about the dimensions of FCC control over programing account for 
all of the prospective delay. 

Implicit in any announced change of FCC policy will be a change in license and re- 
newal application forms. This is a technical matter, and a thorny one. Final decisions will 
wait the over-all policy decisions. 

There appears to have been no change in the essential lineup of the Commis- 
sioners in favor of requiring applicants to tell in narrative style what their com- 
munities need. And then to outline plans for meeting those needs with their programing. 

Thereafter the FCC would check up on how well the stations performed on the program- 
ing promises they had made on their own hooks. 

Much of the delay is due to the fact that the Commissioners have wished to present to 
the critical world as united a front as possible. 

In dealing with the results of the over-all network investigation and the programing hear- 
ings which followed, the FCC has dealt first with matters on which there has been substan- 
tial agreement. 

The effort now that the Commission is getting down to the heart of the problem is to 
give and take so that as nearly a unanimous vote as possible is secured for the final decision. 

The matters now under consideration will shake the broadcasting and advertising 
industries from stem to stern. Therefore, FCC chairman Frederick Ford is hoping for as 
nearly a solid front as he can get to face expected storms of criticism. 

It is possible that the dam could break on any Wednesday this month, but more likely 
that further water will have to flow under the bridge. 



• 18 july 1960 



55 




Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



18 JULY I960 

Copyright 1900 



PUBLICATIONS INC. 



FILM-SCOPE 



A totally unexpected source of regional syndication spending may be General 
Mills' Gold Medal (D-F-S), which is now looking around for half -hours in which 
to slot alternate weeks of Ziv-UA's Case of the Dangerous Robin. 

Gold Medal is still the No. 1 brand in its field, but what it's doing here is to bolster its 
position in the weaker markets. 

Gold Medal as a brand is not a major tv spender, but one of its arch-competitors, Pills- 
bury, used another syndicated show, Ziv's Dial 999 in 30 markets a few seasons ago. 

Note that both shows are of the mystery-adventure type. 



Keep your eye on Silents Please, ABC TV's summer replacement for Ernie 
Kovacs. 

It's a show of silent classics, packaged by Sterling Films, and if it does well, you can ex- 
pect increased interest in these shows for syndication and station programing. 

A large number of silent films have long been available and it's been known that they have 
a special appeal to mature audiences, but the problem has been how to program them 
effectively. 

The syndicator's caution about going into too much new production at this time 
has had one salutary effect: it has served to clear the shelves of inventory ac- 
quired in past seasons. 

ITC's Best of the Post is the latest of the series to go into distribution after a consider- I 
able delay. 

But note that there's no unfavorable connotation for shows that were made ready 
for past seasons. 

Other shows with delayed-action sales, such as NTA's Third Man, made a national-size 
deal to Budweiser, while Screen Gems' Ivanhoe, previously produced abroad, has made impor- 
tant station sales, and CBS Films' Robert Herridge Theater, already sold in Canada and Aus- 
tralia, is moving along in domestic station syndication. 



Second year renewals on Ziv-UA's Lock-Up have been made in 133 markets. 

Among these are 53 American Tobacco markets, 42 of which have already found an al- 
ternate week buyer for the cigarette regional schedule. 

Lock-Up's ratings have been one factor in renewals in many markets. 
Here, for example, are recent Nielsen ratings and shares in 10 cities. 



CITY 


STATION 


RATINGS 


SHARE 


Philadelphia 


WRCV-TV 


19.9 


50.0% 


Syracuse 


WSYR-TV 


31.3 


65.5 % 


New Orleans 


WWL-TV 


26.4 


38.0% 


Birmingham 


WBRC-TV 


29.9 


71.5% 


Boston 


WHDH-TV 


22.4 


48.5% 


Cincinnati 


WLW-T 


22.2 


28.0% 


Kansas City 


WDAF-TV 


25.5 


49.5% 


Knoxville 


WATE-TV 


33.7 


52.0% 


Los Angeles 


KABC-TV 


16.3 


32.5% 


Memphis 


WREC-TV 


21.1 


33.0% 






SPONSOR 


» 18 JULY 



I 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Screen Gems has racked up sales in 115 markets on its new show, Two Faces 
West, and has a renewal from Quaker Oats on Award Theatre re-runs. 

Four advertisers made multi-market deals for Two Faces West, three of them 
breweries: Standard Oil of Texas signed for six southwestern markets; Labatt's Beer took 
Rochester, Buffalo, Watertown, and Erie; Coors Beer bought Denver, Colorado Springs, Yuma, 
El Paso, Amarillo, and Midland-Odessa, and Drewrys in Grand Rapids, Flint, and Cedar Rap- 
ids. (Also, Miles took San Francisco.) 

Quaker Oats (J. Walter Thompson) signed for Award Theatre in 21 Western 
markets for a second year; these include San Francisco, San Diego, Spokane, Seattle, Salt 
Lake City, and Portland. (See WRAP-UP, P. 63, for details.) 

A southwest agency has made a highly unusual move to put itself into regional 
syndication distribution. 

Pitluk Advertising of San Antonio has taken over distribution rights to Campy's Corner 
for the states of Texas, Louisiana, and New Mexico from its producer, Heritage Productions. 

The distribution move was made through the agency's subsidiary, Alamo TV. 

Jack N. Pitluk, Alamo president, says it's the first time an agency has acquired such dis- 
tribution rights and that it intends to sell to its own clients, to other clients, and to sta- 
tions direct. 

Rod Erickson has obtained distribution rights to the Sam Goldwyn feature film 
package and is understood to be negotiating for a large o&o deal. 

The Goldwyn group contains the last of the large pre-1948 holdouts which, in the view 
of trade observers, waited too long and must now face tv sales competition from more recent 
pictures. 

Speaking of the post-1948's, they haven't made the commotion they were supposed to. 

Creative Telefilm and Artists Ltd. of Canada just acquired 110 post-'49 Warner Brothers 
pictures for $11 million plus 50% profit participation; this includes U. S. as well as Canadian 
distribution rights. 

There are already some 1,000 other post-1948's in distribution. UAA alone has over 400 
from RKO, UA and other studios. 

There's talk that Screen Gems is getting set to release 40 post-1949 Columbias, 
and that Twentieth Century-Fox is also mulling a post-1949 tv release. 

Returning to the pre-1948's, last week a federal anti-trust and price fixing suit against 
Screen Gems was lost by the Government. 

Screen Gems is now free to distribute 600 pre-1948 Universal pictures, accord- 
ing to its 1957 agreement whereby it got exclusive distribution rights for 14 years, paying a 
minimum of $20 million annually during the first seven years. 

Ampex has come up with a list (albeit incomplete) of national advertisers who 
are using tv tape in program and spot commercials or in program production. 

Here it is, alphabetically: 

AT&T, Aero-Wax, Alcoa, Allstate, Armstrong, American Motors, Beech-Nut, Bell & Howell, 
Birdseye, Breck, Buick, Brown & Williamson, Campbell, Chevrolet, Chase & Sanborn. Chrys- 
ler, Crackerjack, Crest, Coca-Cola, Colgate, Drackett, DuPont, Eastman Kodak, Fleischmann's. 
Florida Citrus, Ford, Gas Assn., G.E., General Foods, General Mills, Goodrich. 

Also, Hit Parade, Howard Johnson, Hotpoint, Ivory, Johnson & Johnson, Johnson's Wax. 
Joy, Kellogg, Kent, Libby's, Liggett & Myers, Lux, Manhattan, Maxwell House, Mennen, Mer- 
cury, Mayflower margarine, Mogen David, Nabisco. Newport, Nelson's beer, Oasis, Oster, Par- 
liament, Pream, Philco, Pittsburgh Glass, Remington Rand, Revlon, Rexall, Renault. 

Plus Sealtest, Sergeant's, Shaeffer pens, Schick, Simoniz, Standard Oil, Tenderleaf, U. S. 
Steel, Vick, Westclox, Westinghouse, and Zest. 

• 18 JULY 1960 57 



t\: 




A round-up of trade tall: i 
trends and tips for adme 



SPONSOR HEARS 



18 JULY i960 A candy bar account, which not so long ago changed agencies, is again on thi 

Copyright I960 prowl. 

sponsor The new agency's apparent tactical mistake: it recommended that the client abai 

publications inc. don its years of affinity for tv and convert to magazines. 

The marketing director who induced his management to take the account out of the ol 
agency has in the meantime vamosed to other pastures. 






An intensive ''executive suite" situation can be expected at an organization veri 
high up in air media spending which recently installed a new top officer. 

The ad manager is a member of the No. 2's longtime team and it's figured that thi 
No. 1 will be bypassed in the making of media decisions. It happens that the ad di 
rector has always been all out for air media. 

^ ' 

Another firecracker relating to "control" which has been tossed into the CBS 
TV camp: the revolt among tv film producers against the network's insistence 
being granted the merchandising rights when it latches onto a series. 

Wrote the lawyer for one of the producers to Frank Stanton : tell us what your positioi 
on the matter is before we take it up with the proper authorities in Washington. 

A couple notes for those who get a twinge out of nostalgia: 

1) Ma Perkins, whose returns from a seed offer gave P&G its first coveragi 
pattern, celebrates its 27th consecutive year in radio, making it the oldest daytime seria 
after the recent demise of Helen Trent. 

2) With Goodrich now linked only with specials, General Mills can lay claim to hd 
ing the lone surviving customer from NBC's start in 1926. 

Starting with today (18) TvB can't be kidded any longer about being housed 
under the roof of a competitive media ally. 

It's moved from the Newsweek building to the General Dynamics Building in Rocke 
feller Plaza. TvBites seem to be tickled with that "dynamics" association. 

The rep burn-up of the week: a drug account house agency placed orders foi 
seven tv spots a week over 26 weeks and then sought to reneg on all but the moe 
preferable spots on the schedule. 

A couple of the reps retorted that only a two-week cancellation would be acceptei 
so that the stations and themselves would get something of the bother and expense in- 
curred in processing the business. 

The agency's explanation: there'd been a change in plans. The reps are now 
waiting to see whether the business is placed through drug chains. 

Discount the idea that even at this stage of the medium tv pros in agencies! 
have easy sailing in dealing with clients. 

Most of them you talk to still marvel at the lack of knowledge among client top man-; 
agemenl of the advertising business, not alone highly complicated tv. 

Ad managers, they say, still make faulty decisions because of a disinclination to be- 
come thoroughly familiar with the medium and insistence they're program authori- 
ties — particularly their wives. 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 



thori- 

1960 1 



PONSOR ASKS 

Continued from page 51) 

lection. It is an example of radio 
ews reporting we hope to repeat 
uring the current Conventions and 
pcoming election. Mr. Goodman, 
ur moderator, learned that Congress- 
man Adam Clayton Powell was re- 
aming from a meeting with Presi- 
ent Eisenhower with news of great 
mportance to the New York Negro 
ommunity. The Editors Speak pro- 
ram would be on the air at the time 

^ ! i his arrival. A WLIB newsman 
aught Mr. Powell as he deplaned, 
nvited him to join the discussion on 
he air at the time, and, from a tele- 
ihone booth at the airport Mr. Powell 

n . jtecame the guest of the program with 
. five-way phone hook-up with the 
•ditors on the panel in an open dis- 
cission on what Mr. Powell had to 
eport concerning his talk with the 
'resident. The program was a le- 
ritimate news scoop and everyone in 
Ihe New York Negro community was 
iware of the results of the talk even 
iefore Mr. Powell had reached his 
;iome. 

This is the type of public service 
Programing on which our audience 
hrives. It is public service with a 
ioint and a punch and we hope, with 
pur Negro audience having a major 
interest in the 1960 elections, that we 
.vill be able to serve their needs even 
letter than we did in prior years. Not 
iust in news areas, but in all areas 
}f public service which will best serve 
our audience's interests. 

Fred Fletcher, vice president, general 

manager, WRALTV, Raleigh, N. C. 

Our experience in public service 

programing has indicated reaction to 

several types: Religion, sports and 



A on-sectarian 
religious pres- 
entations, teen- 
age sports cov- 
erage, opera 



(Cultural. In the case of our religous 
'program it is non-sectarian, is video 
'taped in advance for the convenience 
jof ministers and musicians, and is one 
(half hour in length each Sunday 
jafternoon. In all audience surveys 
jthis type programing has pulled con- 
sistently high ratings. It is conducted 




by an ordained minister who is well 
experienced in production. In 1955 
he presented over 1,500 musicians in 
choir and solo appearances. Ministers 
of all Protestant faiths participate. 

A series of youth baseball telecasts 
drew many comments. One was from 
a viewer in our outer coverage area, 
who. in tuning in at random, was 
surprised to hear baseball at this 
particular time. Not realizing, at 
first, a Little League game was in 
progress, he spent the first few min- 
utes adjusting the set to get the 
players full size. 

One sports telecast that poured in 
the wires, letters and calls, occurred 
during a severe ice storm that pro- 
hibited some 12,000 basketball fans 
from attending a top-grade tourna- 
ment in Raleigh. Arrangements were 
quickly made with tournament offi- 
cials to telecast the opening day's 
game on a public service basis with 
the proviso that other stations could 
pick up the origination. This de- 
lighted not only the ticket holders 
stranded at home and in motels, but 
thousands of fans who were unable 
to obtain tickets due to the sell-out. 

Another program that has created 
favorable response is our program of 
opera scheduled in prime time. We 
recently presented the second pro- 
duction that ran for 90 minutes. Two 
additional opera telecasts are planned 
for 1960, due to the tremendous re- 
sponse we received from the last. The 
performances are by a professional 
touring troupe, the National Opera 
Company, which is jointly adminis- 
tered by WRAL-TV. All perform- 
ances are in English and considerable 
ground work is done through schools, 
music clubs and other organizations 
prior to each performance. The letters 
and comments have been most grati- 
fying. 

A public service award of which 
we are proud was presented by the 
United States Weather Bureau for 
"making" a major contribution to 
public safety during the threat of 
Hurricane "Gracie." Hourly telecasts 
were made from a remote at the local 
weather station on the progress of the 
storm. The programs were made 
available to other stations. From our 
standpoint the aforementioned ex- 
amples have the most public appeal. 
Of course, these are just a few of the 
public service shows presented, but in 
the main religious, sports and cultural 
received the best response. ^ 



when 

your 

clients 

demand 




SAN ANTONIO'S 




ABC Television in San Antonio . . . 

the Greatest Unduplicated Live 

Coverage in South Texas! 

Represented by 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



• 18 july 1960 




L 



NEWS & IDEA 

^ WRAP-UP 



SUMMERTIME SUNDRIES for WOWO, Ft. Wayne, promotion kicked off with "Miss WOWO 
Summer Sizzle" contest. Below, some of contestants surround winner Kari Aldrich, who'll appear 
throughout the summer in such audience participation events as 'beach ball' and 'family picnic" 




ADVERTISERS 



Daytime network tv has beconi 
another battleground for the m 
tional cakemixes. 

P&G's Duncan Hines i Compton 
will have three quarter-hours of it 
own weekh on NBC TV. while Gen 
eral Mills '< BBDO > is on the vM 
of allocating SI million in behalf ( 
its Betty Crocker line on the sani 
network. 



Pittsburgh Plate Glass (BBDO; 
will use 20 spots on CBS Radio'* 
Garry Moore show in August tc 
continue the sponsor's identitj 
with that star a while longer. 

PPG sponsored Moore on CBS T\t 
this past season and it also happei 
that August is the month in which 
auto owners do most of their glass 
replacement. 

The FTC crackdown on the merg- 
er of the Clorox Co. with P&G 
might be interpreted as some-' 
what of a setback to the soapi 
giant's expansion range. 



50-STAR FLAG goes to Sister Mary Berna- 
dine of Schlarman Children's Home from 
WMBD's (Peoria) Walter Thurman for ce- 
rect answers to station's history questions 




SPECIAL DELIVERY of KSET's (El Pasc) 
new 24-hour broadcasting schedule is pro- 
vided by coeds Ann Spinks (I), Kay Young I 




fejj The examiner in the case upheld 
jjBie thesis which was used in the com- 

laint citing the proposed merger 

£ illegal, namely: 

1) The acquistion of Clorox. 
hich already had ±9' < of the liquid 
leach market, would lessen competi- 
on and tend toward monopoly. 

2) P&G's financial and economic 
rength, its tremendous advertising 
nd promotion power and ability to 
uy media at maximum discounts, 
ave it advantages which prevented 
xisting competitors from expanding 
)y normal methods of competition. 

* a( " ) Interesting citation in the prelimin- 
ry decision: Joint purchase of ad- 
vertising with P&G for a 12-month 
ieriod ending 30 June resulted in a 
laving of $138,500 for Clorox. 

Jamm's Beer took the number 
►ne spot in ARB's May Best- 
Jked Commercial tally, for the 
m erond consecutive month. 

J Post cereals jumped to second place 
ind Piel's Beer moved back to num- 
>er three. Two newcomers to the 
urvey: Nabisco and Procter & Gam- 



ble. Three commercials, after a long 
absence returned: Texaco, Winston, 
and Chevrolet. 

Here is how the survey lines up: 



% COMMERCIAL 


RANK BRAND 


MENTION 


1) Hamms Beer 


7.1 


2) Post Cereals 


4.4 


3) PielsBeer 


4.1 


4) Johnson Baby Powder 


3.8 


5) Burgermeister Beer 


3.0 


61 Ford 


2.9 


7) Dodge 


2.8 


8) Mr. Clean 


2.5 


9) Seven-Up 


2.2 


10) Doublemint Gum 


2.0 


Kraft Foods 


2.0 


L&M Cigarettes 


2.0 


13) Dial Soap 


1.9 


Ivory Soap 


1.9 


Winston Cigarettes 


1.9 


16) Kelloggs 


1.8 


Snowdrift 


1.8 


18) Brylcreem 


1.4 


19) Maxwell House Coffee 


1.3 


20 i Nabisco 


1.1 


Procter & Gamble 


1.1 


Texaco 


1.1 


23) Chevrolet 


1.0 



General Foods and P&G appears 
to have elected to buck ABC TV's 

the U ntoucliables this fall with a new- 
comer standup comedian, Bob New- 
hart. 

It'll be known as the Bob Newhart 
Show, with CBS reportedly making 
a substantial talent contribution. 



Campaigns: 

• Dow Corning Corp. ( Church 
& Guisewite, Midland, Mich.) has 
scheduled its biggest campaign for 
two silicone products. Shoe Saver and 
Suede Saver. The theme "silicone pro- 
tectors" for footwear will be launched 
on network tv this fall. Commercials 
which demonstrate the product's water 
and spot repellency. will be aired on 
ABC TV afternoon shows from 13 
September to 18 November. The one- 
minute commercials will run on Beat 
The Clock, Who Do You Trust, and 
Love That Bob. 

• Shulton (Wesley Associates) is 
running its most intensive national 
campaign for the Bridgeport line of 
insecticides (Bug Bomb. Slug-A-Bug 
and Flower Guard) . The high spot of 



tROSIT! Toasting recently consummated contract between Anheuser-Busch and WNBC, N.Y. 
I Newark Rathskeller restaurant are (l-r) Ralph Rapisardi, A-B's N.Y. State div. mgr.; NBC's 
B Herman Maxwell, Johnny Andrews; Andrew McClellan, A-B east. reg. administrator 



RICIN' TO THE OCCASION, d.j. Ro< 
Roddy (I), KQV, Pitts., takes chopstick le< 
sons from Dan Yee, newest member of his sho< 




WATER SHOW, staged by WGY-WRGB, Schenectady, drew estimated 30,000 to city's Central Park. Featuring the Tommy Bartlett 
|Water Ski troupe, the hour-long show was presented free of charge by General Electric stations as a thank you to listeners 



3rd. AIVIVOAL 

WGV - WROe 

WAT BR THmtU. 9H0W 




FIRST 

OVERALL SIGN-ON TO SIGN-OFF 

FIRST 

IN FIVE OF SIX 3-HOUR 

CATEGORIES 

6 AM TO MIDNIGHT 



DETROIT 

II YEARS OF LEADERSHIP IN THE NATION'S 5th MARKET 

WJBK-TV 



the STORE R station 

years of responsible 
oALL KATZ 



the program is the multi-weekly spots 
on the Jack Paar Show lasting 11 
weeks and reaching 100 markets. 

• Carlsberg Beer (Wexton Co.) 
is using spots on radio stations in 
\r\\ ^ ork, New Jersey and Connecti- 
cut for a consumer "one word" con- 
test to push distribution. All an- 
nouncements maintain the lofty liter- 
ate tone in keeping with the Quaff- 
manship campaign of 1959. 

• General Electric will launch, 
in the fall, a $1 million light bulb 
sales push. It will center around a 
nationwide tv campaign, featuring 
Mr. Magoo, with a political campaign 
theme and tie-ins with the presidential 
election. Tv plans include 100 spot 
commercials in each of 125 key lamp 
markets for a four-week period be- 
ginning 19 September and the use of 
269 stations reaching 95% of the pop- 
ulation. Agency: BBDO, Cleveland. 

• A. C. Gilbert will begin a 
campaign on behalf of American 
Flyer trains and stock cars on ABC 
TV. Sponsorship will start on 15 
November and continue through 
Christmas on these shows: Rin Tin 
Tin, Rocky and His Friends, My 
Friend Flicka. 



AGENCIES 



Compton continues on its hot 
account-snagging trend. 

The past week it brought in three: 
Alberto-Culver, $12 million, Toyota 
Motors, $750,000, and Calvert, $1.5 
million. Brings the billing to the $90- 
million-plus range, the highest it's 
ever been, and giving it a diversity of 
products as wide as any of second 
sized agencies. 

(See 11 July sponsor, page 8, for 
more on recent Compton billings 
zoom.) 

Compton has gone international 
with its acquisition of Garland 
Advertising Service Ltd., London. 

Compton, billing $90 million, and 
Carland, in operation since 1922, feel 
that the new affiliation will enable 
both agencies to enlarge its scope. 
Garland-ComptomLtd. will be headed 
l'\ its present management. 

Agency appointments: American 
Oil ( Amoco) from Joseph Katz, N.Y., 
to D'Arcy, Chicago, billing $6 mil- 
lion . . . Lever's Hum laundry liquid 



to JWT and Rinso Blue and Rinso 
Soap from JWT to SSCB . . . Kemper 
Insurance Group, billing $1 million, 
to Clinton E. Frank from John W. 
Shaw . . . General Acceptance Corp. 
from Brown & Butcher to Wesley 
Associates . . . Oakite, marketed by B. 
T. Babbitt, to Geyer, Morey, Mad- 
den & Ballard . . . Lever Brothers. 
Ltd., to Cockfield, Brown & Co.. 
Montreal, for French language tv pro- 
grams . . . Gayloard Products to R. 
Jack Scott, Chicago . . . Pearl Brew- 
ing Co. to Tracy-Locke Co., Dallas, 
billing $1.5 million. 

New agency: Evan D. Neuhoff. 
formerly of WBZ-TV, Boston, and 
Joseph H. Perkins have opened Com- 
munications Consultants, Inc., a 

new agency specializing in broadcast 
media services. The offices are located 
in Brookline, Mass. 

Merger: Grant Advertising and 
Robinson, Fenwick & Haynes. 

Los Angeles, have merged. The move 
will add over $4 million to Grant'? 
annual billings of $90 million. 

New offices : Irving J. Rosenbloom 
and Associates, billing $4 million, 
opened a Beverly Hills branch to be 
headed bv Sydney M. Cohen . . . 
Robert C. Durham Associate* 
opened offices in Ft. Lauderdale and 
Miami. Fla. . . . Mid American Ad- 
vertising, Parkersburg, W. Va.. has 
oDened an Eastern Marketing; Divi- 
sion in Philadelphia. Tvson L. Jan- 
ney will head the new office. 

Moved: ARB's Los Angeles office 
has moved to 6615 Whittier Blvd. 

Admen on the move: Elected v.p.s 
this week: Edward J. Going at 
SSCB. Harold Graham, Jr. and 
Thomas F. Greenhow at M-E Pro- 
ductions (radio/tv affiliate of Mc- 
Cann-EricVson). Melvin G. Grover 
at Camobell-Mithun. Betty Thomas 
and Robert L. Nourse at Adams & 
Keves. David G Watrous at Earle 
Ludgin . . . Thomas J. Ellis t- 
AUston. Smith & Sorrmle as directoi 
of media planning; and purchasing . . • 
Major General Harlan C. Parks, to 
General corporate executive at Mc- 
Cann-Erickson . . . Named account 
supervisors at Burnett: John C. 
Ianiri, Charles Jones, and Wil- 
liam S. Robinson . . . Vernon Lut- 



i:!( 



18 july 1960 



rell, to marketing executive at Lam- 
»ert & Feasley . . . Marge Flotron, 
o Earle Ludgin as media director . . . 
Charles A. Pooler, to executive 
•ommittee of ARF. 



•The influenee of UA's production 
philosophies is beginning to make 
*tself felt at the Ziv-UA organiza- 

ion - *■ 

Hitherto Ziv always created and 
jroduced programs from "within the 
shop." 

UA's idea has been to deal with 
individual producers on individual 
-hows. 

Since the Ziv-UA merger, shows 
such as Home Run Derby and Case 
of the Dangerous Robin were reflec- 
tions of Ziv-originated attitudes to- 
ward production. 

| Now Ziv-UA has signed its first pro- 
duction deal with an independent: 
John Robinson will deliver a con- 
temporary action show through his 
Libra Limited company. 

It is the first Ziv-UA production 
deal to show evidence of UA-styled 
thinking. ^ 

Sales : Screen Gems' Two Faces West 
to Labatt's Beer in Rochester. Buffalo. 
^Watertown. and Erie; to Coors Beer 
in Denver, Colorado Springs. Yuma, 
El Paso, Amarillo. and Midland- 
Odessa: to Drewrys in Cedar Rapids. 
[Flint, and Grand Rapids; to Miles of 
California in San Francisco: and to 
[stations including KTTV. Los An- 
geles; WGN-TV, Chicago; WWJ-TV, 
Detroit; WDSU-TV. New Orleans: 
WLW-A. Atlanta: WTVJ. Miami: 
WSM-TV, Nashville: WBNS-TV, Co- 
lumbus: WTCN-TV, Minneapolis: 
KFMB-TV. San Diego: WJXT. Jack- 
sonville: WBTV. Charlotte, and 
WAVY-TV, Norfolk . . . Ziv-UA's 
Lock-l p renewed or purchased for 
I second year by Old Kent Bank and 
Trust CAves Shaw & Bing) alternat- 
ing with Standard Oil of Indiana on 
WOOD-TV. Grand Rapids: Safeway 
Stores on KXLF-TV. Butte: Doiri- 
inques Chevrolet on KLFY-TV. La- 
fayette: Towne Services on KCEN- 
TV . \\ aco-Temple, and Hansen Dairv 
Products in Great Falls. Mont., which 
station to be selected, plus Shell Ad- 
vertising on KNOE-TV, Monroe. La., 
with client still unnamed; second 



year station sales include WTMJ-TN , 
Milwaukee; WBAL-TV, Baltimore; 
WWJ-TV, Detroit; KFSA-TV, Ft. 
Smith; WMAZ-TV, Macon; W J AR- 
TY, Providence; WSTV, Steubenville, 
and WRVC-TV, Philadelphia; new 
stations to carry Lock Up are KFYR- 
TV, Bismarck; KMOT-TV, Minot; 
KUMV-TV, Williston; KDIX-TV, 
Dickinson; WTVM, Columbus; 
WCTV, Tallahassee; KLAS-TV, Las 
Vegas, and KOOK-TV, Billings. 

Tape commercials : San Francisco's 
first "silent" tv spot was a soft sell 
commercial produced on tape by 
KGO-TV for Morris automobiles; 
the commercial featured an actor 
performing like a mechanical man 
and turning flip cards . . . S & H 
Green Stamps (SSC&B) used the 
mobile Amplex recorders of Mobile 
Video Tapes of Hollywood to turn 
out 28 commercials in seven days 
featuring home interviews with Cali- 
fornia housewives, including some at 
widely scattered California locations. 

Feature film sales: MCA's Para- 
mount pictures package to \^ DEF- 
TV, Chattanooga; WDBJ-TV, Roa- 
noke; WRVA-TV, Richmond; WKTV, 
Utica, and WFMH-TV, Youngstown. 

Promotion: CNP's Blue Angels has 
been praised in Congress by Rep. 
James E. Van Zandt of Pennsylvania, 
a Navy veteran. 

Tape installations: Ampex's latest 
tape installations are at KARK-TV, 
Little Rock: WTVJ, Miami: KIMA- 
TV, Yakima; Fuji Photo Film Co.. 
Tokvo; Purdue University, West La- 
fayette: University of Georgia, Ath- 
ens, and I mobile unit) at WTCN-TV, 
Minneapolis. 

Strictly personnel: Marion Doh- 
erty named casting director of 
Screen Gems' Naked City . . . Ste- 
phen I. Simon is director of client 
services for NTA's Television Audi- 
ence Research (TAR) . . . Gerald F. 
(Jerry) Rester is eastern sales man- 
ager Ampex video products . . . 
Larry Woolf joins Graphic Pictures, 
Chicago, as a producer/account ex- 
ecutive . . . Drummond Drury 
elected v. p. of photography for Film- 



Commercials : Tracy-Locke Com- 
pany of Dallas captured facial ex- 



pressions of a descending parachutist 
in a commercial produced for Cham- 
plin Oil & Refining Co. 

Unions : SAG has reached an agree- 
ment with AMPP and ATYP provid- 
ing pension, health and welfare bene- 
fits, and increases in minimum rates, 
one retroactively to 1 June 1960 and 
another to take place in 1962. 

More on feature films: M & A 

Alexander of Hollywood has a V.I.P. 
package of 35 post-1950 feature films 
which has already been sold to, 
WAGA-TV, Atlanta; WJBK-TV, De- 
troit: WISH-TV, Indianapolis; 
KRON-TV, San Francisco; WAVE- 
TV, Louisville; WCAU-TV, Philadel- 
phia; WREC-TV, Memphis; KFSD- 
TV, San Diego; WWL-TV, New Or- 
leans; KHQ-TV, Spokane; WKBW- 
TV, Buffalo; KRLJ-TV. Las Vegas, 
and KGNS-TV, Laredo. 



NETWORKS 



Looks like ABC TV will become 
the beneficiary of a SI -million 
expenditure from Brillo (JWT) 
for the coming season. 

It'll be a mixture of night and day- 
time participations. 
The loser: NBC TV. 

NBC Radio had joined the cur- 
rent promotional hoopla about 
what age groups dominate the 
audience. 

Come 1 August the network will 
unveil a study jointly developed by 
NBC Research and Nielsen which will 
admit : 

Network radio reaches mostly the 
middle-aged 35-49-year-old housewife 
group. 

But. the promotion piece, will be 
quick to point out that it is this age 
group — whence network radio de- 
rives its hardiest loyalty — that ac- 
counts for the highest disposable in- 
come and spends the most money by- 
products. 

Network tv sales: Schick Electric 
Shaver i B&B i will co-sponsor The 
Witness with Esquire Shoe Care 

Products i Mogul. Williams \ Sa\- 
lor i on CBS TV on alternate Thurs- 
day . . . Jantzen i Hockaday ) has 
signed as a sponsor for the ABC T\ 's 
American Bandstand . . . Firestone 



NSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



63 




RADIO 

MIAMI 




the STORE R station 

backed by 33 years 
of responsible, broadcasting 

CALL KATZ 



Tire & Rubber (Campbell-Ewald) 
will sponsor the weekly half-hour 
Eyewitness to History on CBS TV 
next fall . . . General Electric Theater 
will present a special one-hour pro- 
gram on education on CBS TV in 
November. 

Thisa 'n' data: Robert Sarnoff 
pledged that NBC Radio and TV 

will present the Republican and Dem- 
ocratic presidential and vice-presiden- 
tial candidates in a series The Great 
Debate, if Congress passes the re- 
quired legislation . . . Mutual will 
again air the full schedule of the 
Baltimore Colts . . . AB-PT and Dis- 
ney have settled their squabble: ABC 
sold its Disneyland stock, at a sub- 
stantial profit, back to Disney and 
Disney won't sue the network any 
longer regarding their tv contract. 

Network personnel notes: How- 
ard Barnes, to CBS TV as director 
of programs, administration, Hollv- 
wood . . . Alfred Greenberg named 
manager, stations promotions serv- 
ices, for CBS o&o radio stations. 



RADIO STATIONS 



Japan Airlines is buying across- 
the-board nightly spots in sev- 
eral markets to drum up summer 
travel trade. 

Apparently the airline figures that 
by the time the two-months' campaign 
starts. 1 August, things will have 
quieted down in Nippon. The spots 
will be next news. 

Agency: Botsford, Constantine & 
Gardner. 

CBS's seven radio o&o's taking ad- 
vantage of the political conventions to 
put together coverage maps based on 
mail counts. 

The stations will offer to give away 
SO many transistor sets daily for the 
"lucky" listeners who send in their 
names and the counties in which they 



Ideas at work: 

• Safety in St. Louis: KMOX, 

5t. Louis, in a two-week on air "Child 
Safet) Campaign," is running record- 
ed announcements, during local orig- 
in programs, with athlete"? wives urg- 
ing motorists to drive with caution. 
Grade schoolers are competing in a 
"Safetj Slogan Contest," the winner 



receiving a transistor radio, four I 
tickets to a Cardinal game, and din- I 
ner for four at a local bistro. 

• Breaker's pies: WNAX. I 
\ankton, S. D., asked its listeners to I 
supply their favorite pie recipes to I 
the station. The idea: station staffer- | 
sifted through the assortment and se- I 
lected the recipe which would best 
demonstrate their prowess in pastry 
preparation. Listeners, whose con- 
tributions were chosen, received cash 
prizes. 

• What's the percentage: 
KFWB, Los Angeles, asked members 
of the advertising world to "Think | 
Mink." The idea: contestants were 
to guess the average rating share for 
the months of March- April. Thej 
prize: a mink stole, of course. 

• Wanna win a kangaroo?: 
KXLR, Little Rock, is helping thei 
city complete its zoo via a marathon | 
broadcast. Each of the station's per-i 
sonalities broadcast, round the clock, 
from a lion's cage (the occupant hav- 
ing been relocated), in an attempt toj 
raise money to buy three kangaroos.! 
Listeners are also requested to sub-j 
mit names for the animals. W inner- 
of the contest will win the kangaroos 
... to be given in their behalf to the. 



Thisa V data: WHK, Cleveland, 
in an effort to curb the highway deatlvj 
toll in Ohio, made a safety campaign! 
kit available to over 100 stations iiw 
the state . . . Every record played on 
W.IL, St. Louis, is being given awav 
to its listeners during the "RecorJ 
Rampage" . . . W^N'AR, Norristowid 
Pa., held its third monthly KoffeJ 
Klatch at Vallev Forge Countrv Clu :| 
Inn . . . WCBS. N. Y.. d.j". Jars 
Sterling is distributing novelty weatl I 
er forecasters to the trade . . . WKA J 
Oklahoma City, helped apprehend tw 1 
women jewel thieves via a new J 
broadcast . . . KQV, Pittsburgh, rarl 
a contest in conjunction with thj 
Community Chest and United Fundi 
and awarded two one-week vacation! 
at camp . . . The annual Iowa Tall 
Corn Network Convention was helJ 
21-23 June and elected to office were! 
Ben Sanders, KICD. Spencer, presi.. 
dent: George Bolger. KWPC, Musi 
ratine, vice president: Glen Stanley! 
KBOE. Oskaloosa. secretary: Jim 
Bowden. Minneapolis rep. treasurei I 

Kudos: WISN, Milwaukee, recipil 
ent of Union Carbide's 7th annual 



:: 

1'S|; 



rard for Excellence in Programing 
. KFI, Los Angeles, program Turn 

ick the Clock given the Armed 

•rces Radio Award. 



ation staffers: John J. Heet- 

j nd, named general manager. KIXZ, 

marillo . . . Richard G. Salerno, 

general manager, KCKY, Coolidge. 
riz. . . . Al Racco, to general man- 

f> jer, KLAC, Los Angeles . . . Charles 
. Gunn, to general sales man- 
ner, CKLW, Detroit . . . John R. 
- anty, appointed station manager, 
CCM and WGHJ-FM, Lawrence, 
lass. . . . William Venell, to na- 
onal sales manager, WPBC. Min- 
Jteapolis-St. Paul ... At WGAR, 
ileveland: Dale F. Palmer, to na- 
tional sales manager and James K. 
S ard, to sales promotion manager 
. . Alfred N. Greenberg, named 
nanager of station promotion serv- 
ces. CBS Radio o&o stations . . . 
ienneth L. Ross, to account execu- 
ive. KFMB. San Diego . . . Dick 
West man resigned as v. p. of KLAC, 
Los Vngeles . . . Tom Hanserd, to 
•perations manager. WSM, Nashville 
... To account executives: Kenneth 
L. Miller, KABC. Los Angeles. How- 



ard Zacks and Edwin Charles, 
WKAT, Miami Beach, Jerrv 
O'Brien, WICE. Providence. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Western FM Sales may have start- 
ed something by announcing 
there'd be a 20% discount for 
agencies buying through West- 
ern. 

Their explanation for departing 
from the traditional 15%: 

"FM rates are relatively low in re- 
lation to other broadcast media and 
agencies, in some instances, cannot 
afford on present commissions to de- 
velop the specialized copy or cam- 
paigns that are required to take ad- 
vantage of the specialized fm audi- 
ence." 

Western also announced its mer- 
ger with Modern Media FM Sales so 
that they may provide expanded rep- 
resentation for their fm stations. 
They'll now have coverage in Hollv- 
wood and San Diego, in addition to 
their present 16 markets. 

The John E. Pearson Co. has 



put out for station and general 
trade consumption a nifty precis 
dealing with its dimensions, phil- 
osophy, and people. 

The presentation starts off with 
posing the query, "What Is JEPCO " 
and then proceeds to answer it in 
terms of opus operandi, branches 
and executive biography. 

CBS TV Spot Sales is distributing 
issue #1 of its new house organ 
called Saleslants. 

The first copy dramatically illus- 
trates the importance which the huge 
shopping centers play in the market- 
ing of almost every product. 

The growth of suburbia buying is 
pointed up graphically: 

YEAR CITY SUBURBS 

1950 S4.3 $0.9 

1958 3.6 f— 15%) 1.9(+107%) 

Rep appointments — stations: 

WOKY. Milwaukee, and KCBQ. San 
Diego, to John Blair & Co. . . . 
WEEP. Pittsburgh, to Gill-Perna . . . 
WPBC. Minneapolis -St. Paul, to 
Broadcast Time Sales . . . WIA Y 
Lynn. Mass.. to Kettell-Carter Sta- 
tion Reps, Boston. 



Wte&eaace'. . .m greenville-spartanburg-asheville 



A GIANT Market ranking with Birmingham, 
Nashville, New Orleans and Richmond* 



SPARTANBURG 
GREENVILLE 




■Here's- the comparison, from TELEVISION Magazil 
Data Book. March 1960 (Note: Add (000) to all figun 





TELEVISION 


TOTAL 




RETAIL 


MARKET 


HOMES 


HOMES 


POPULATION 


SALES 


WFBC-TV 


394.5 


502.4 


1,971.6 


$1,517,766 


Birmingham 


427.3 


549.1 


2,096.6 


1,724,231 


Nashville 


345.2 


463.4 


1,731.4 


1,426,693 


New Orleans 


383.4 


468.8 


1,710.7 


1,556,221 1 


Richmond 


272.5 


329.2 


1,315.5 


1,266,846 



DOMINANCE IN THE RATINGS! 

Beginning in 1953. WFBC-TV was 
first to serve all three metro areas of 
Greenville. Spartanburg and Asheville. 
From sign-on to sign-off, WFBC-TV 
has dominated every major survey 
covering these three areas. 



WFBC-TV 



Represented Nationally by 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



Ask the Station or our 

Representatives for complete 
information, rates, and avail- 
abilities in the "Giant Market" 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 




Rep appointments — personnel: 
FYter Allen, appointed sale? execu- 
tive. John Blair i, Co.. Detroit . 
Allen Long, to t\ sales. Avery- 
Knodel . . . Richard Junker?. 
named account executive, NBC Radio 
Spot Sales. 



Y^gjW 

CLEVELAND 



the STORER station 

backed by 33 years 

of responsible broadcasting 

CALL KATZ 



TV STATIONS 



The upcoming 1 14-10 November I 
Broadcasters' Promotion Associ- 
ation Convention Mill concentrate 
on "how-to" sessions rather than 
formal presentations. 

The decision on the new- format 
was made after surveying BPA mem- 
bers, the majority of whom favored 
the "shirt sleeve" discussion groups. 

On the agenda: color tv. budgets, 
merchandising, the FCC and Harris 
committee, image building, etc. 

Ideas at work: 

• Fourth's festivities Personali- 
ties and executives of KDKA-TV. 
Pittsburgh, were kept hopping on 4 
July weekend as participants in the 

station's summer promotion cam- 
paign. Four affairs, staged around 
the Independence Day celebrations, 
were scheduled by the station with 
the thought of keeping as many peo- 
ple off the road as possible. Featured 
events included: an "Old Homeweek" 
parade with KDKA stars, a five-hour 
water show. "Dennis the Menace" 
contest, and an evening of entertain- 
ment and fireworks. 

• Breakfast in hed: A recent 
contestant on the One O'Cloch Show, 
h BAL-TV, Baltimore, revealed that 
a life-long desire of hers was to be 
served breakfast in bed. Emcee. Bob 
Jones, picked up the remark and of- 
fered his services as "garcon" for the 
occasion. The little lady got her re- 
past amid envious sighs' from friends 
and neighbors. 

• Gone fishing: KROC-TV. 
Rochester. N. Y.. and its client. Koer- 
ner Motors, ran a promotion to sell 
cars via the "Fishing Festival." The 
promotion: 1.000 gold fish were 
tagged and placed in a 5.700 gallon 
swimming pool, which the auto deal- 
er installed in their showroom. Cus- 
tomers surrendered their car regis- 
tration and were entitled to fish for 
10 minutes. Tags were numbered to 
indicate the prize won or a chance 
for the grand prize drawing. 



Thi«a V data : \\ SJS- \M-FM-T" 
^ inston-Salem. recently published 
brochure listing the features it jr 
duced in the public in: 
showing the organizations and caua 
served by the stations . . . Casead 
Broadcasting Co. previewed CB 
T\ 's "Creepy Peepy" in covering \ 
Yakima Diamond jubilee . . . A sji 
vey conducted by Social Resear I 
Inc.. for TY Guide, points out tha 
the •"highbrows." who are highly cri 
ical of television, make up less tha 
five per cent of the nation's tv audi 
ence . . . Bozo the Clown I Bill Al| 
son i star of WKJG-TY. Fort Wayi 
was guest star with Ringling BrJ 
thers Barnum and Bailey Circus wh 4 
it came to town . . . KPHO-T"4 
Phoenix, completed its 300-foot to*J 
and is now operating on 100.0 
watts KEYC-TV, Mankat* 

Minn., joined the Forward GrouA 
of radio and tv stations . . . OtM 
cago first place winners in thfl 
Crown Stations Treasure Hunt are 
Dale Arvidson. Grubb Advertising 
Larry ClaypooL JWT: Francine Gold 
fine. Arthur Meyerhoff; Lino Bumba 
Burnett: and Elliot Johnson. McCai 
Erickson. 

New quarters: KSTP-AM-TY, j 
Minneapolis-St. Paul, has announce* 
plans for a $9 million office and ho 
tel center in which its own quarter) 
will be incorporated. 

Kudos: WWL-TY. New Orleans, n 
cipient of a "special citation*' froi.— 
the city "for continuous cooperation 
with the Citv Council and Chamber 
of Commerce, and for constant serr-l 
ice to the community" . . . "VTNEM- 
T\ . Bay City-Flint-Saginaw. Mich..! 
awarded the 1960 School Bell Award J 
for distinguished state and local re-l 
porting, and its interpretation of edu- 1 
cation during the 1959-60 school vear. J 



On the personnel front: Norman 

Hawkins, to general sales manager. 
CKLW-TV, Detroit . . . H. George 
Carroll, to operations manager. 
KFRE-AM-FM-TY. Fresno. Calif.... 
Frank Merklein. joined TvB as di- 
rector of member sales presentations 
Arinin N. Bender, to as-istant 
sales manager. WROC-TY. Rochester. 
N. Y. . . . MacDonald Dunbar, to 
TvB as account executive . . . Johnny 
Wright, to account executive-. WSPA- 
T\ . Spartanburg. S. C. ^ 



SPONSOB • 18 .ILLY 19( 




1 positi. 



Tv radio 

NEWSMAKEI 



Elmer 0. Wayne assumes his new position 
as general manager of ABC radio station 
KGO, San Francisco, today. Before entering 
broadcasting, he was in advertising and 
sales with Curtis Publishing. In 1951, 
Wayne joined WJR, Detroit, as general 
sales manager, and in 1957 he became vice 
president of that station. Two years later 
he moved to KFI, Los Angeles, assuming 
general sales manager. Wayne is a graduate of West- 
liversitv. He and his wife Kathryn have two children. 



k 



ajor General Harlan C. Parks (U.S.- 

F., Ret.) has joined McCann-Erickson 
i a general corporate executive. General 
rks has spent a total of 31 years in the 
rvice: 14 with the Air Force and 17 with 
S Army. For the past three years, he had 
len Chief of the Army and Air Force Ex- 
|ange Service, and was responsible for the 
irld-wide administration of PX's. Gen- 
ial Parks will assume many of the duties currently discharged by 
ilbert Stilson, executive v.p. and general manager of the agency. 

Cecil K. Carmichael has been named a 
vice president of Benton & Bowles. He 
became associated with the agenc) in 1947 
in its publicity department, and in 1956 
he moved into an account executive posi- 
tion. Two years later, Carmichael was ap- 
pointed account supervisor at B&B. Before 
joining the agency, be was with NBC, first 
in the promotion department and later as 
sistant general manager of the network's o&o stations. He's been 
th Crosby Broadcasting; WBT, Charlotte, WKRC, Cincinnati. 

Racco was named general manager of 
JLAC, Los Angeles, AM and FM opera- 

>ns. He joined KLAC and KLAC-TV 

iow KCOP) in 1952 as sales service rep- 

sentative and was subsequently promoted 

the position of account executive. He 

|]en achieved the status of local sales man- 

;er with the station. Before his association 

ith the Los Angeles station, Racco held 

|e positions of sales manager of KRUX. Phoenix, and account 
Ij.ecutive with KNX, L. A. He assumed his new post on 7 July. 

ll'ONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 






A TELEVISION 

ADVERTISING 

DOLLAR WELL SPENT 

Sell Western Montana 
At $1 per 1,000 TV Homes 

• 9 OUT OF EVERY 10 TV HOMES view only 
KMS0-TV in Far-Western Montana. Cap- 
tive Audience in 90% of the area. 

• 7 CITIES ENJOY KMSO-TVs Best Lineup 
of CBS, NBC, & ABC programs in Montana. 



Missoula, Butte, 
ton Deer Lodge, 


Anaconda, Helena, 
and Kalispcll. 


Hamil- 


"Preferred City" (M 
hit 20° o , highest o 
18 V.H.F. Boosters ' 
KMSO-TV to 


ssoula) Bank Debits 

all Montana cities. 

extend" coverage of 


58,475 


TV 


HOMES 







INTR0DUCING THE NEW 

IIYHI-USr 

HOTEL 

39th St., East of Lexington Ave. 

NEW YORK 

Salon-size rooms • Terraces • New 
appointments, newly decorated • 
New 21" color TV • FM radio • New 
controlled air conditioning • New 
extension phones in bathroom • New 
private cocktail bar • Choice East 
Side, midtown area • A new concept 
of service. Prompt, pleasant, un- 
obtrusive. 

Single $15 to $22 Suites to $60 
Special rates by the month or lease 

Robert Sarason, General Manager 
ORegon 9-3900 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



* 



The seller's viewpoint 



The down-to-earth selling qualities of television are not exploited as much 
as they should be in the opinion of Robert E. Miller, sales manager for 
WFBG Radio and WFBG-TV, Altoona. He cites a real down-to-earth case 
to illustrate his point — that of a maker of earth-moving equipment in his 
area who is successfully advertising on video. What makes the example 
particularly significant is the fact that the client was not producing a con- 
sumer-type product but machinery of interest to a limited group of people. 

PROSPECTING VIA TELEVISION 



gam 






T.I 



I elevision is defined, explained, attacked, defended, de- 
bunked, and extolled by many devices. And sometimes the 
fundamental values of television as medium of comunica- 
tion — getting attention, arousing interest, creating desire 
and asking for orders — are degraded by quantitative meas- 
urements only. Yet it is irrefutably true that tv, properly 
used, is peerless in its appeal to all kinds of people. 

It is also true that television is unmatchable as a sales 
tool in finding prospects, presenting the product, motivat- 
ing people, and producing the desired response — the profit- 
able completion of business transactions. 

For example, P. M. Burns of Clearfield, Pennsylvania, is 
a consistent television advertiser. He deals in heavy earth- 
moving equipment — tractors, graders, trucks, etc. He re- 
tails one type of dump truck for about $46,000. 

\\ hen he was approached by WFBG-TV salesman Dave 
Pretz, he recited his problem: finding a very small number 
of qualified prospects in a tremendous area. 

After discussing the nature of his business — and his 
problem — at some length. Burns agreed to try television 
on a limited basis. He bought two Class B. I.D.'s, weekly 
(ROSl, after 11 p.m. His announcement was a simple 
voice over slide production, showing a picture of a piece 
of equipment, listing several brand names (makes) and 
inviting the viewer to see the selection personally. 

He had no other advertising outside his immediate area. 

Patiently Mr. Burns watched this campaign roll along. 

Then it happened. A prospect from Chambersburg, 
Pennsylvania, \ isited Burns three months after his tele- 
vision schedule began. The prospect explained that he had 
"seen the advertisement on tv and thought it might be 
worthwhile to come up." Besides mentioning that the 120- 
mile drive was pleasant, he said he really did not know of 
an) nearei place that offered the equipment he wanted. 

A sale was made. 



68 



This experience illustrates certain fundamentals well 
enough to make reviewing them of consequence. First 
there was a definition of the problem; namely, how should 
one find prospects in an area marked by Harrisburg (13Q 
miles east), by Pittsburgh (110 miles west), by St. Marys,j 
Pennsylvania, on the north and by Cumberland, Maryland, 
100 miles south? Obviously, "trade" advertising wouM 
have meant overlapping into the territories of other dealers.; 
And use of other media of local advertising would require) 
a complex of costly advertisements beyond the scope ofl 
Burns' budget. 

Second, any suggested solution to the problem had to 
include consideration of new entrants in the contracting 
field, as well as that prospect who needed equipment for 
expansion of his activities or for replacement of worn out 
equipment. Of course, Burns' list of his own customers 
and of contractor-prospects in the area revealed those who 
could be reached personally or perhaps by mail. However, 
distance and dispersement of potential customers made 
these methods seem impracticable. 

It made sense, then, to choose television, because of its 
extensive geographic coverage, because the great number 
of people reached by television increased the probabilities 
of success in getting his message consistently to the group 
he wanted (in a two-station market the audience is less 
fractionalized I . and because WFBG-TV simplified his ad- 
vertising operation. 

That Burns is delighted by the results is evidenced by his 
twice renewing his 52-week contract. And he insists thai 
the copy remain unchanged. 

A gratifying sequel to this success storv is that a loca 
heavv equipment repair shop is now imitating the p.n 
Burns technique and is already satisfied with results. 

We urge our advertisers to remember these values anc 
to use television completely. 






SPONSOR • 18 JULY 196( 



OMMERCIALS 

Continued from page 43) 
I jmbination of live action special ef- 
Ixts for four. Humor was employed 
|y eight and color by only one. 
[ tusical and sound track was relied 
Ipon bv 13, and product demonstra- 
I on bv only one. (See chart pages 
t 2-43.) 

I One particular trend emerges as 
I eing of primary significance from a 
I erusal of the entries and winners in 
lais first American TV Commercials 
festival. It is the growing apprecia- 
- ion of the ability of the public to 
like and understand a more sophisti- 
I ated commercial than they have been 
I xposed to in the past. From the 
tandpoint of less copy needed, more 
[mdience involvement achieved, better 
Hse of picture values, entertaining 
inimation backstopped by selling 
lopy, the commercials chosen by the 
WV Council for this festival are 
vorthy of employment as guide posts. 
I It is hoped that agencies, their cli- 
ents, and advertising clubs and pro- 
duction associations will take advan- 
tage of the opportunity offered by the 
Festival Director to screen and ap- 
braise this outstanding work. ^ 



WAPI-TV 

{Continued from page 39) 
the program-commercial in the Bir- 
mingham market. 

Today, less than four months since 
the start of the campaign, Sterling 
advertising manager Walter Gottfred 
reports the Sterling Weathervane 
station break has "provided the most 
powerful advertising vehicle the com- 
pany has ever used in tv." 

Plans are now underway for Sterl- 
ing's expansion of the Weathervane 
idea to additional tv markets. ^ 



FILM-VIDEO TAPE 

{Continued from page 39) 
anywhere from 10 days to three 
weeks. 

That's where film and tape came 
together. "Why not,'" mused Coun- 
tryman, "run "A" and "B" rolls and 
the magnetic sound track in synchro- 
nization and put the whole thing to- 
gether on video tape?" 

The idea was hatched, and here's 
how the schedule worked out: 

Saturday and Sunday: Shot film on 
nearby Lake Minnetonka. 



Monday: Film was processed and 
projected for producer and agencj to 
select takes to be used. 

Tuesday: Agency provided revised 
scripts, edited film into "A" and "B" 
rolls. Voice over sound track and mo- 
tor and water sound effects were re- 
corded. 

Wednesday, a.m.: Sound effects 
dubbed and sound track was edited. 

Wednesday early p.m.: Countryman 
and PSL people moved into the 
WCCO-TV tape control room. "A" 
and "B" rolls were threaded in two 
synchronous projectors in the film 
room, while the magnetic film sound 
track was set up on a recorder in the 
control room. 

Projectors and tape player were 
started in perfect sync. Cuts, dissolves, 
and wipes from scene to scene were 
executed on the special effects board. 
Video tape playback provided im- 
mediate "answer prints." 

Wednesday, 3:30 p.m. After three 
takes, one-minute and two 20-second 
commercials had been completed and 
duplicated. The spots were ready for 
a Fridav air date. ^ 



The date: Tuesday, July 26 

The place: Pelham Country Club 

The occasion: The Broadcast Industry's 2nd Annual 



fun iUw 



SPONSORED BY 



RTES %_^F 



Reservations are pouring in .... if you haven't made yours. 
call RTES Headquarters (PL 8-2450) or send coupon NOW: 
Claude Barrere /RTES /515 Madison Avenue /New York City 

Yes, I'll be there 

Reserve places for dinner and dancing 

Golf AM PM 

Enclosed is ($10.00 per person for dinner & dance) 



Join the festivities for this full day of fun . . . golf, tennis, 
swimming, softball and many other daytimeactivities, topped 
off by a night of dancing and entertainment. 

• Scores of prizes for competition in various sports events. 

• Special contests for the ladies. 

• Golf will include prizes for low net, high gross (Duffer 
prize), driving contest and others for hole-in-one, pitching, 
putting and chipping. 

Plan to spend the entire day with us or come out for the 
dinner and entertainment. 
Get your reservations in early. 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1960 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 






The program challenge off the '60's 

Ordinarily SPONSOR, as a weekly n>e book for radio/tv 
advertisers and their agencies. doe> not greatly concern itself 
with programing in the air media. 

Our primary role i- to present dollars-and-cents facts and 

new- about radio/tv buying, marketing, and selling methods 
which will enable the industry's customers to use the broad- 
cast media more fully and more efficiently. 

Details of programing we generally leave to the consumer 
press and to the journal- that are concerned with talent and 
show business problem?. 

But we believe the time has come to speak out frankly 
about the programing crisis and the programing challenge 
which radio and tv will be facing in the *60"s. 

We are convinced that, in recent years, broadcast manage- 
ments have tended to neglect the all-important subject of 
program creativity and program development. 

Far too much of their time and attention have been devoted 
to selling, to research, to financial and executive problems. 
Far too little to finding new. fresh, original program uses for 
the radio and tv media. 

We believe this situation is becoming serious. 

No industry can hope to grow and prosper if it neglects it- 
product. And programing is the product on which the whole 
-tincture of broadcasting is built. Every dollar of advertis- 
ing that comes to radio/tv comes solely because of their 
program-product acceptance. 

In the decade ahead the air media will face tougher compe- 
tition lor customer attention than we have ever known. Com- 
petition not merely from print, but from every sort of other 
activity — -ports, travel, community activities, adult educa- 
tion — which a richer, better educated, more sophisticated 
American people will find increasingly attractive. 

There is only one way in which radio and tv can meet such 

competition — by better, more interesting, more creative pro- 

- Bui so far, with a few outstanding exceptions, we 

have -<en little evidence that network and station manage- 

-■ em to understand this challenge. 

We believe that it is imperative for industry leader- to 
face the current programing plateau — and to begin devising 
ways and mean- to give back to radio and tv the creative 
vitality they have had in year- past ^ 



l 



10-SECOND SPOTS 

The great moment: Lead of a pre 
release from Seymour. Krawitz Pu 
licit>. N.Y.C — ••Silly Putty, 
worlds only solid liquid toy. celebn 
ed its tenth year of existence by 
ufacturing the 25 : 000,000th toy 
roll off the assembly lines of its Be 
Haven | Conn. | plants." We're 
pressed. 

Sweet revenge: An elderly lad; 
stalled on the Merritt Parkway cah\ 
a Connecticut garageman for a to 
car. Agreeing on a price, the fron 
end of the car was raised and the tw 
vehicles proceeded on to Wiltoi 
where the lady emerged with a satis, 
fied glint in her eye. '"Fifteen dollai 
seemed a little steep." she said a 
verely. "so I decided to make yo 
work for it. I kept the brake on all 
the way." — Caskie Stinnett in "'Speak 
ing of Holiday." 

Last resort: Sign in a Cambridge^ 
Mass.. television repair shop — DO IT 
YOURSELF— THEN CALL US. 

Steady, boy: Watching a man try; 
without success to unlock the door of 
his house, a policeman asked if lie 
could handle the kev for him. 

"No thanks," the man replied. "'I 
can hold the key : you hold the house." 
—Carl deSuze. WBZ. Boston. 

Squelch: In his early in store ad- 
vertising. Howard Abrahams. no>»" 
TvB v.p. of retail sales, invented 
a stock replv to store buyers who 
came to him with the line. "I could 
have written a better ad than that. 
"Take it easy." Abrahams would 9ay . 
"and let me tell vou about an experi- 
ence my father had when he was ac- 
countant for a circus. One time the 
circus was so broke it didn't have the 
dough to move to the next town] 
Well, my father got the idea of sellii ._' 
all the animal manure for fertilize:. ] 
and how much cash do you think 1 J 
raised?" 

No matter what the buyer guessed I 
— whether 50 cents or $5,000 — Abra- I 
hams would say. "You're absolutelv I 
right! And that just goes to show j 
\ ou know more about fertilizer tha i 
advertising." 

Competitive spirit 4 : TV Guide re- I 
ports there's a Dallas grocery store 
that stocks Brand X. 

SPONSOR • IS JULY 196" 



WELLJHAT'S 

WIN, PLACE & SHOW 

BUSINESS! 





3 Network Share of 
Audience* 


ABC-TV 


38.7 








2 8 



The first report in July is in— and so is ABC ! Our 157c lead over Net Yand 
41% lead over Net Z is the biggest in a season of wins. ABC is in first 
place on five nights, in second on two, and never in third. Quite a "track 
record". Advertisers finish in the money, too, when they pick ABC -TV. 

•Source: Nielsen 24 Market TV Report, average audience, week ending July 3, 1960, 7 nights 8:00—10:30 PM. Mon. through Sun. 

ABC TELEVISION G 



Did you 



1200 ft 





.and Rockford, too 



Yes, the prudent buver knows that WISC-TV at 
Madison. Wisconsin has the tallest tower in the state, 
bringing service to 378.310 TV homes in thirtv-two 
counties in Wisconsin. Illinois and Iowa. For instance, 
in the Rockford area, WISC-TV now carries 25 out of 
38 nighttime CBS Network programs exclusively. 



WISC-T 

$ ^ CMAMME 

MAD I SON. Wl SC. 



^f S fafmertol No.ionoll, b, 

= e-t-s. Griffin, Woodword. It 



28 JULY I960 
40« ■ copy«$S m ymr 




HE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



WKBW 



JUL 2 5 196C 



'* M «. HFDR 



FIRST IN BUFFALO 




and PULSE AGREES 

WKBW is No. 1 



Xj AVERAGE SHARE 
(O OF THE AUDIENCE 



oril I960 PULSE (Buffalo) Mon-Sun 6:00 A.M.-12:00 MIDNIGHT 



NEW TV TREND: 
SPONSORED 
PUBLIC SERVICE 

Upcoming season will 
see 300% more client- 
backed shows of thi:» 
type than ever before 

Page 29 



Spot radio plugs 
get new life via 
featurettes' 

Page 34 

New interest 
in radio's 
last word' 

Page 38 

SPONSORS 
semi-annual 
story 

Page 41 



WKBW — BUFFALO — 1520 
SO, OOO WATTS • Clear Channel 



Represented by 
AVERY-KNODEL 



In these days of confusion 



concerning si 



ngle,' 



aL' 



and retail rates, and 



Hying 



charges and counter-charges of "rate-cutting" and "deals," the KSTP Gold 
Seal remains— as it has for 32 years — your pledge of honesty and integrity in 
the commercial operation of Radio and Television. 



Guarantee 

Every advertiser 

receives the same 

rate for equal 

schedule and 

facilities 



RADIO 

50,000 WATTS 



KSTP 



TELEVISION 

CHANNEL 5 



MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL 

KOB AM-TV 



Basic NBC Affiliate 

W-GTO AM 



Albuquerque, New Mexico Cypress Gardens, Florida 

Edward Petry & Company, Inc., National Representatives 



After 3 Years, 

Ratings Are Healthier 

Than Ever! 




These heavy audience favorites keep growing stronger every year. After three years, U.A.A.'s 
Popeye and Warner Bros. Cartoons tip the scales with a hefty ARB Average of 15.1 and 12.8 
respectively. And this includes every market — regardless of station, time period or competition 
-for which ratings are available. Weigh these facts carefully. And keep your ratings healthy 
for years to come with Popeye and Warner Bros. Cartoons. 



U.CI.CI. 

UNITED ARTISTS ASSOCIATED, inc. 



NEW YORK 247 Park Avenue. MU 7 7800 

CHICAGO 75 E. Wacker Dr.. DE 2-2030 

DALLAS 1511 Bryan St . RI 7 8553 

LOS ANGELES 400 S Beverly Drive. CR 6-5886 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



all these "eggs" 

in one 

SI PERMARKET 

basket; 




Industry means poyroll power, so if 
you re shopping' for a rich market 
. . . you ve found it in the Spartan- 
burg-Greenville-Anderson SUPER- 
market where sales ore directly 
influenced by the broad coverage of 
WSPA-TV. From its centrally located 
tower on Paris Mt. near Greenville, 
WSPA-TV is a potent force in the 
buying habits of over l-Vj billions of 
payroll dollars in this fastest grow- 
ing of all markets. 

AM FM — TV 

WSPA-TV 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 

CBS in the GSO Piedmont 

Channel 7 

National Representatives: 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 



j I,,'. ,'/. Va 10 • 25 JULY I960 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

New tv trend — sponsored public service 
29 Brightest spot in the 1960-61 program season will be sharp rise 
by number, of informational and cultural shows backed by client- 

Ciant-size radio for Coke of N. Y. 

32 Bottler dominates medium in region with $1.6 million annual out 
la> embracing 40 stations: all-media push launches 12-ounce size 

Spot radio gains with 'featurettes' 

34- Eleven sales by Adam Young firm of spot-and-program vignette- 
sh<ra appeal of plan: agencies and advertisers praising the am idea j 

Is your tv show reaching buyers? 

36 Ticmlrx documents industry suspicion that when women are "involved" | 
in tv show selection thev buy more of the sponsor's merchandise ] 

Tv commercial stunt takes unforeseen tack 

37 Midwestern viewers may think they're seeing parachutist's average 
jump but behind-the-scene look at commercials reveals different slorx 

New interest for radio's 'last word' 

38 New area> of prime time are emerging as surreys show increase in night- 
lime -hopping and driving to market; admen call for stiffer research 

SPONSOR'S semi-annual index 

41 A Jannary-through-June listing of all stories appearing in SPONSOI 
with a total of 16 categories listed alphabetically, stories chronologically 



FEATURES 

56 Film-Scope 

26 19th and Madison 

60 News £ Idea Wrap-l p 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

60 Picture Wrap-l" p 

52 Radio Result- 

80 Si Uer's \ iewpoint 

48 - gor Vsks 

12 Sponsor Backstage 

Member of Business Publications 



58 Sponsor Hears 

1.9 Sponsor-Scope 

82 Sponsor Speaks 

si Spot Buys 

82 Ten-Second Spots 

24 Timebuyers at Work 

78 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

55 Washington Week 



PHE1 



Editor 
, N. Y. 



it, Circulation an* 

TtUphona: Murray 

7-9863. Birminsfhi* 

Angeles Office: 6087 



Hill 8-2772 Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SU| 

Office: 3617 8th Ave. South Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 2-6528. 

Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 31 . 

Md. Subscriptions: U S. $8 a year. Canada b other Western Hemisphere Countries $» 

year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. *-" 

all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hi 

by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltirm 

©1960 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



I 8-2772. Published weakl, 



25 JULY I960 



Some allegedly overheard comments 
about television 

(ivith a very transparent device at the end) 



We've been peering over shoulders with 
f) our ear to the ground and slightly damp- 
ened finger to the wind while keeping a 
weather eye peeled on the horizon, and 
wish to report the following items. 



• A lady, seeking public alms, described 
her plight: "My baby has no bed to sleep 
in." "Teh, tch," said the case worker, 
"how do you manage?" The lady answered, 
"We have to use the box the television 



• Two well-heeled gentlemen were wait- 
ing for a train. Said one, "The television 
commercial / want to see is one where the 
forces of evil — all those ugly bacteria — 
overwhelm the medicine. Man — think of 
the bacteria they'd sell." 

• Man watching tv: "Can't stand those 
1 short commercials somebody's thought up. 

Hardly give you time to get the refrigera- 
tor door open, let alone find a bottle 
opener.'" 

• Sign in a grocery: We don't handle 
Brand X. 

• Overheard at the Katz Agency : "More 
than half of Iowa's 775,950 tv homes are 
in the WMT-TV area." 

• Overheard in three consecutive ARB's: 
"An average of more than half of the tv 



homes in the WMT-TV area are tuned to 
WMT-TV." 

• Overheard at CBS: "WMT-TV. Chan- 
nel 2, is CBS Television for Eastern Iowa." 

• Overheard at the post office: "Whv 
don't thev say mail address Cedar Rapids?" 




25 jlly 1960 




KGLO TELECASTS ALL 

OF THE TOP 15 
ONCE-A-WEEK SHOWS! 

AND 8 OF TOP 10 
MULTI-WEEKLY SHOWS!* 

* Telepulse Report 

KGLO-TV 

MASON CITY. IOWA 



Branham Co. National Reps. 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Last iceek. Edward H. Little, a legendary figure in the adver 
tising industry relinquished the helm of the Colgate-Palm 
olive Company. W ith his retirement, the leadership reins o] 
America's seventh biggest advertisers passes into the hands mj 
George H. Lesch. a man almost unknown in radio or tv. 

The newsmaker: George H. Lesch. who was named to the 

top post of chief executive officer of Colgate-Palmolive, succeeds a 
dynamic predecessor. Edward H. Little. In his new post Lesch will 
have final responsibility for an advertising budget which last year 
gave over S46 million to television. Whether or not he will exercise 
the same scrupulous supervision over air media expenditure as die 
his predecessor, was a much-debated question along Madison Ave. 
last week. Lesch himself grew up in the international end of Colgate- 
Palmolive. 

Lesch. who just last April was elected company president, began 
his career with Colgate-Palmolive in the companv's home office ac- 
counting department in Jersey 
Citv back in 1932. Four years 
later, he became a member of the 
European auditing staff. Later, in 
1939. Lesch gained much of his 
executive know-how when as of- 
fice manager of the company sub- 
sidiary in Mexico he was able to 
observe and participate in all 
phases of the company operations. 
Five years ago he was elected 
president and general manager of 
the corporation's Mexican sub- 
sidiary In 1957 Lesch became 




George H. Lesch 



president of Colgate-Palmolive International as well as a vice presi- 
dent and a director of the parent company. 

The 51-year-old chief executive officer succeeds a man whose 
keen insight into the potential of advertising earned for him the 
name "America's greatest salesman." His intense interest in tv and 
radio inspired him to study minutely every concept of the media. 

During the last 22 years, under Little's leadership, the company's 
sales totaled more than $7 billion. 

The 79-year-old retiring advertising man who remains as chairman 
of the board — expressed faith in the ability of his successor when he 
said. "Despite the fact that our business is one of the most competi- 
tive in the world. I am certain that under his leadership, the com- 
pany will continue its growth and progress, and within the next few 
years will reach the SI billion dollar mark in annual sales which we 
have set as our goal." ^ 

sponsor • 25 JULY 1960 



RESERVED FOR 



Nielsen Coverage Service 



IVC 



<*► '61 



J NCS -61-RADlO 




for complete radio 
and tv coverage facts 

NCS '61 will separately report all 
U. S. counties including some 20 city 
areas in Alaska and Hawaii. NCS '61 
will provide basic broadcast media 
data, coordinated with 1960 U. S. 
Census data and capable of being com- 
bined to meet any media or marketing 
requirement. 

Since 1952, Nielsen Coverage Service 
has had industry-wide acceptance as 
the authentic and detailed source of 
tv and radio media-market information 
. . . county-by-county. Now NCS '61 
is being readied by a permanent staff 
of coverage specialists and expert tech- 
nicians in time for tie-in with the 1960 
U. S. Census. 

NCS, produced with proven tech- 
niques for maximum usefulness, is the 
only service providing authoritative 
coverage facts in complete county-by- 
county detail on: 

SET OWNERSHIP 

Total homes . . . tv homes . . . radio homes 
(from the 1960 U. S. Census of Population) 

STATION CIRCULATION (daily, weekly, day. 
time, nighttime) 

Each tv station . . . VHF or UHF 

(including direct or wire-line service) 

Each radio station . . . AM or FM 
(including out-of-home listening) 

Total radio use, county 
by county 

FOR ALL THE FACTS 

Send for complete information on NCS 
'61 and find out how you can take advan- 
tage of substantial "multi-media" and 
"prompt purchase" discounts. 



CAL 



. OR WRITE TODAY 



Nielsen Coverage Service 

a service of A. C. Nielsen Company 
2101 Howard Street, Chicago 4-5, Illinois • HOIIycourt 5-4400 



CHICAGO 1 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



MORE THAN 




HOURS 



of 



LOCAL 



EACH 
WEEK 



programming 



nn 


RESIDENT M*WACE« _ 


(AST MOLINE / 





This is the PLUS factor that makes 

WOC-TV more exciting — more 

interesting — more effective than the 

competition. Yes, more local 

programming for homemakers, 

for sports fans, for youngsters . . . 

all this in addition to NBC, 

top ABC shows and the best of the 

syndicated shows. 

These are the people that buy 

products in the nation's 47th TV 

market. More than 2 billion dollars 

in retail sales ring on the 

retailer's cash register. Over 438,000 

TV homes are within the 42 

counties of WOC-TV's coverage area. 

And to help you get the maximum 

number of these dollars WOC-TV 

specializes in effectively co-ordinating 

and merchandising your buy at 

every level — the broker, wholesaler. 

direct salesman, key buyer as well as 

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Your PGW Colonel has all the facts, 

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New, exeitiiwr 

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SPONSOR 



Editor and Publisher 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 
News Editor 
Ben Bodec 
Managing Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 



Midwest Editor (Chicago* 

Gwen Smart 
Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 
Associate Editors 

Jack Lmdrup 
Gloria F. Pilot 
Ben Saff 
Lloyd Kaplan 
Walter F. Scanlon 



Contributing Edito 

Joe Csida 



Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 

Editorial Research 

Helene Etelson 

Barbara Parkinson 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMEN1 

Sales Manager 

Arthur E. Breider 

Eastern Office 

Willard Dougherty 



Midwest Manager 

Paul Blair 

Western Manager 

George Dietrich 
Production 

Phyllis Waldbrand 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

L. C. Windsor, Manager 
Virginia Markey 
ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Massimino, Assistant to Publisher 
Laura O. Paperman, Accounting Manager 
George Becker; Anne Marie Cooper; 
Michael Crocco; Syd Guttman; Wilke 
Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Dorothy Tinker; 
Flora Tomadelli 



25 jlly 1960 



IN CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA 

I * Clarksburg * Fairmont * Morgantown 




YOUR 

PRODUCT'S 

BEST 

FRIEND 

IS 



he FRIENDLY Group's 



SHOPPER TOPPER STATION 



^ 




IN CLARKSBURG: 

Roger Garrett-MAin 4-7573 
IN NEW YORK: 

lee Gaynor-OXford 7-0306 

Represented Nationally: Avery-Knodel, ln< 



In Television too, a station is known by the companies it keeps! 
Here at WBOY-TV our sponsor list reads like the "Who's Who" 
in local and national advertisers. Yes, Iron City Beer, Lever 
Brothers, Ford Dealers, Gulf Oil, Carlings Beer, Domino Sugar, 
Carnation Milk, Hope Natural Gas, Procter and Gamble and 
U.S. Rubber are just a few of the firms who buv BOY to tell and 
sell 150,000 TV families in the heart of Central West Yir<n'nia- 
families with almost ONE BILLION DOLLARS TO SPEND. 

Member The FRIENDLY Group i |l£g$l| jjohn J. Laux, Managing Director 



CHANNEL 9 

The lowest cost television bridge to the 
Upper Ohio Valley's Five Billion Dollar retail 
market. The best of CBS and ABC. Plus Shop- 
per Topper Merchandising. 

John J. Laux, Exec. V-P. - AT 2-6265 
Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 




CHANNEL 12 

28% taller and 29% more powerful. Tells 
and sells 152,000 TV homes who spend 750 
million annually. The best of CBS and ABC. 
Plus Shopper Topper Merchandising. 
D. T. Knight, General Manager — MA 3-7260 
Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



CHANNEL 3 

More to see on Channel 3 with NBC. Domi- 
nates the key corners of Tennessee. Georgia 
and Alabama where over a million people 
spend 800 million dollars. 
Harry Burke, General Manager — OX 8-1505 

Represented by H-R 



CHANNEL 12 

Newest member of the FRIENDLY Group serv- 
ing over a million people with 721 million 
dollars to spend. The best of CBS and ABC 
Networks. 

Robert E. Metcalfe, Managing Dir.— TA 4-5432 
Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc.. 



CHANNEL 12 

A captive audience of 150,000 TV homes with 
a spendable consumer income of almost One 
Billion Dollars. The best of NBC and CBS 
Plus Shopper Topper Merchandising. 

Roger Garrett General Manager— MAin 4-75?" 
Represented by Avery-Knodel. Inc. 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



"Action 
speaks 
loudest! 



Speaking of sales . . . nothing speaks clearer 
than high-speed television action. And CBS 
Films has three of the fastest-moving action 
shows in all syndication : 

NAVY LOG ... the U. S. Navy at war and in 
peace, in 102 half -hours of adventure on the 
high seas. A favorite on network television 
for three years, Navy Log is repeating that 
success in scores of markets coast -to -coast. 
THE GRAY GHOST . . . the daring deeds of 
Colonel John S. Mosby (of Mosby's Raiders), 
and the ideal action show to tie-in with the 
forthcoming Civil War Centennial celebra- 
tions. Stars Tod Andrews in 39 half -hours. 
U.S. BORDER PATROL ... the adventures 
of the nation's most mobile law-enforcement 
agency, battling crime on land, sea and in the 
air, along 6,000 miles of United States border. 
Richard Webb stars in 39 half-hours. 
Want to turn up sales volume? Let one of these 
action-charged series do the talking for you. 

CBS FILMS % 

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k, Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit, Boston, St. Louis, 
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BACKGROUND 

Edward R. Murrow returns— with 
a major innovation in news pro- 
grams. Every Sunday he and crack 
CBS News correspondents abroad 
examine the week's most signifi- 
cant news in a 25-minute interna- 
tional "conference call." The ob- 
jective : to impart fresh insight into 
the meaning of the news. In all 
radio , Edward R. Murrow is the 
kind of company you keep . . . 

ONLY 
ON CBS 
RADIO 




; 



by Joe Csida 

I Sponsor 

J© 

Convention: Best radio/tv coverage yet 

Since I write this on 10 July, and leave in the 
morning for Los Angeles, it is almost impossible 
for me to come up with a column on anything 
hut the television/radio coverage of the political 
conventions. All kinds of exciting and interest- 
ing news have already been trickling back from 
L.A., but to me the most fascinating rumor is 
that which says that my old fellow VIP'er and 
European traveling companion Leonard Reinsch has a better than 
even chance to become national chairman of the Democratic Party 
to succeed Paul Butler. Butler has already said he will resign right 
after the Party picks its candidate, and the talk is that the top men in 
the Party favor Leonard for the spot. Leonard certainly needs no 
buildup here. He has been one of the leaders in the broadcasting 
industry for many years, while at the same time serving the Demo- 
cratic Party in countless important ways. He has, as a matter 
fact, been working out in L.A. for the past several weeks in his ca- i 
pacity as executive director of the Democratic Convention, and from , 
all reports has done his usual excellent job in this difficult task. This j 
corner, and all of Leonard's friends are rooting for him to get the 
big job. The Party certainly could not find a better man. 

The Conventions this year promise to make for the kind of viewing 
that few Americans will be able to resist. In 1948, it's estimated that 
approximately 10 million people watched the Convention telecasts, 
but this year the conservative guess is that 10 times that many, or 
a hundred million, will tune in at one time or another. The Conven- 
tion radio and tv coverage on the three networks alone will cost 
roughly $20 million, and most of this will be picked up by such 
sponsors at Westinghouse (CBS) ; RCA, Cowles Magazines, Lipton 
Tea, Brown & Williamson, B. F. Goodrich (NO ; and DuPont and 
20th Century Fox on ABC. 

Bigger budgets and new techniques 

It's impossible to guess how many more millions of dollars will 
be spent by local tv and radio stations and, in turn, their sponsors. 
WNEW in New York, and WFIL in Philadelphia, are just two ran- 
dom, but good examples of the extra costs local operations are tak- 
ing on. The New York station is signing two former governors of 
New York State, Herbert Lehman and Averell Harriman as commen- 
tators, and additionally will have a full staff of newsmen covering the 
convention. WFIL, along with other Triangle stations, is sending a 
staff of 10 men to Los Angeles to cover the sessions. 

Including the six cameras, which will operate for the three-network 
pool, there will probably be some 60 or 70 cameras around the 
Sports Arena, the various prospective candidate's hotels, etc. Apart 

sponsor • 25 JULY 1960 



I 



Sponsor backstage 



from local station personnel, the three webs will have over 1.000 
people at the conventions, including reporters, editors, technicians. 
and others. All of the networks have spent months preparing special 
facilities and handling procedures. NBC, for example, is very proud 
of an electronic editing procedure it has developed. This setup en- 
ables a news editor to pick the picture he wants to transmit from 
four monitors, instead of the 28 from which the editor had to make 
his selection at the Conventions four years ago. NBC will have 32 
cameras on the scene, but these will be channeled to a perset control 
room where an experienced news director will pass a given four on 
to the news editor at am one time. 

NBC's technicians have also developed a little gadget which figures 
to eliminate one of the more annoying little regular occurrences at 
previous Conventions. This is a Sync Signal Phase Shifter, which 
eliminates the roll-over on your receiver at home, which generallv 
occurs, when shifts from one remote location to another are made. 
You're also likely to get vour Convention coverage this vear with far 
better audio than ever before. NBC has an audio preview device, 
which permits the editor to hear the sound from camera on location 
before he puts it on the air. And CBS has a new Transit-talkie, 
which they claim has about four times the power for delivering a 
clear, interference free signal of the Walkie Talkies used four years 
ago. CBS also has its Eyewitness camera, which is completely self- 
contained and self-powered. The camera itself only weighs four 
pounds, but you're likely to see a number of back-wearv camera- 
men toting these little boxes, because the battery and its housing, 
which the cameraman wears on his back, weigh 15 pounds. 

All in all the three networks have probably moved 75 to 100 tons 
of equipment to Los Angeles for the Democratic Convention, and 
will move much of it to Chicago when the Republicans get together 
on 25 July. 

Nets relying on veteran news analysts 

None of this, of course, would mean very much unless first class 
reporters, editors, analysts, etc. utilized all this equipment. And 
here, in what is a mark of television and radio's stability in the im- 
portant public affairs areas, we have top and experienced veterans 
on all three of the networks. ABC's team will be led, of course, by 
the very able John Daly; Walter Cronkite will be in the anchor slot, 
and Ed Murrow and Howard K. Smith will be leading analysts for 
CBS; and the recent Emmy award winners Chet Huntley and David 
• Brinkley will lead the NBC teams. There is no doubt in my mind 
that beginning tomorrow evening and running through this entire 
week, then resuming 25 July in Chicago and running through that 
week, a hundred million Americans will have a closer, more intimate, 
more detailed, more thoroughly analyzed and explained look at their 
Government's most important election than am people anvwhere on 
earth have ever had, or are likelv to have for quite some time. And 
here and there a kindly critic may condescend to utter a word or two 
in praise of one or another of the broadcaster's efforts. But on that 
same da\ . or the day after, you can count on reading at least one 
fiery piece on the horrible shortcomings of television programing in 
these United States. ^ 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 




Perkins 

Her story is the oldest, continuous 
daytime drama in radio, but Ma 
Perkins is as up-to-date, as freshly 
confident as the youngest face in 
Rushville Center. Her point of 
view, her newest adventure always 
hits home, no matter where home 
is across America. Sponsors find 
her sales message hits home too. 
In all radio , Ma Perkins is the 
kind of company you keep . . . 

Only 

OnGBg 

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SPOT 



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P ETERS, G BIFFIN, WOODWARD 



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SPONSOR-SCOPE 



Hicks & Greist has chosen a novel way of composing a market and station list 
for its Powerhouse Candy Bar account. 

The stratagem: Reps have been asked to submit a list of radio stations that have the 
strongest teen-age appeal in the respective markets. The buys will be chosen from these 
entries. 

Reps' reaction : the method may be confusing, but at least they're in there pitch- 
ing for the business from the start. 

Planters (Kemper) is lining up availabilities for a dual product campaign 
which will take off after 1 September. 

There'll be separate campaigns around kid shows for the peanut butter and minutes also 
during the daytime for Planters Peanut's cooking oil. Run: 6-8 weeks. 

Other spot tv placements and calls out of New York: Bristol-Myer's Sal Hepatica 
(Y&R), fringe minutes for three weeks, starting at once; Timex (Doner), I.D.'s prior to the 
gift buying season; Avon (Dreher), 20's and minutes in fringe time; Golden Press (Wex- 
ton), 2-3 week saturation flights, beginning toward the end of August; American Chicle 
(Bates). 

Cities Service (Ellington) will use prime 20's for 13 weeks at the rate of 5-6 a week, 
effective 5 September, in six markets. 

The three soap giants will be pouring out a lot of spot tv money during the next 
six months for market testing new products alone. 

Lever by itself has four in addition to Hum ( JWT) , liquid detergent, on the shelf for 
unveiling. P&G has four and Colgate, two. 

Look for the national campaign committees to make greater use than ever of 
the five-minute segment on nighttime network tv this fall. 

Citing how well this device worked out in 1956, the networks have been encouraging the 
committees to put the emphasis of their buying on the final five minutes carved out of a 
regularly scheduled program, instead of preempting a lot of half -hours. 

However, there's one big difference between 1956 and 1960 in terms of programing con- 
venience. Four years ago the shows had a large live contingent, whereas this fall 
they'll be paltry and far between. 

Faced with the stiff problem of editing five minutes out of a half-hour film show, the net- 
works are suggesting that the five-minute carve-out be restricted to hour film fare. 

Taped shows will pose no difficulty, provided the producers get adequate notice. 



NBC TV's sales sees the next two weeks as desperately important in disposing of 
the remaining fall inventory. 

There can't be much selling, even to the bargain-pickers, after the first week in August 
because advertisers must have the next several weeks to promote the new campaign to 
their trade and get the commercials under way. 

As far as nighttime is concerned, NBC is at least 40% unsold. The competitive 
situation: All but a minute on Aquanauts and half of Person to Person is sold on 
CBS TV, while on ABC still available are these: all of Walt Disney and Bugs Bunny, lots 
of Winston Churchill, and pieces of Hong Kong and the Roaring 20's. 



sponsor • 25 JULY 1960 



19 



I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Where to look for merchandising excitement this fall: the battle of the nev 
electric shaver models between Schick (B&B) and Norelco (LaRoche). 

Norelco's putting the bulk of its tv money into weekend spot tv blitzes in ovei 
100 markets, while Schick — which has allocated $2.5 million for the drive — is making 
CBS TV's Face the Nation the main spearhead of its promotion. 

Norelco will also be buying network tv. The spot campaign, which starts 17-18 Septem- 
ber, will run through New Years, with a four-week layoff before the elections. 

For a lot of oldtimers the retirement of E. H. Little as Colgate's chief executive 
officer last week this thought might have been evoked: here goes the last of the three 
autocrats that figured prominently in the rise of air media. 

The other two : George Washington Hill, president of American Tobacco, and Francig 
Countway, president of Lever Bros. 

To each you might ascribe this epitaph: he quickly recognized the value of a new| 
advertising tool but made sure that he himself dictated how it best could be used. 

(For details on the top level changeover at Colgate see newsmaker, page 6.) 

Credit tv with taking a sideline of the hosiery business out of obscurity and sky- 
rocketing it into an important position in the softgoods field. 

The item: the supporting nylon hose, whose leading brand is Supp-Hose (Mojud)j 
now a multi-million-dollar spender in tv. 

New angle: Supp-Hose (via Daniel & Charles) will resume its seven-week flights in 
October at the rate of 12 spots a week, using this time 40 markets. It will be back in) 
the spring for a similar splurge, continuing also with the Jack Paar show. 

The article's market has expanded from the upper-middle-aged group and new mothers to 
all types of workers who spend a great deal of the day on their feet. 

Mojud boasts of the fact that it's the only brand on the soft goods field that's 
promoting itself a la International Latex. 

P.S.: Burlington Hosiery (Donahue & Coe), which also turns out a support brand, iai 
also taking a look at spot tv for the fall. 

The 1960 graph on the average hours of viewing per day per home is maintain- 
ing its upward course: Nielsen reports that the May average was also up over last year. 
A comparison of May for the past three years : 

YEAR AVERAGE VIEWING HOME 

1958 4 hours; 14 minutes 

1959 4 hours; 27 minutes 

1960 4 hours; 28 minutes. 

Now that P&G's got its cake mix (Duncan Hines) dominating the field it's 
turning much of its merchandising weight toward making something out of the salad 
oil business. 

It's trying to find out how best to penetrate that market via copy tests being made with the 
newly introduced Crisco Oil (Compton) in four markets. 

Interesting marketing sidelights on the latest P&G product burst: 

• The drift toward salad and all purpose oils has been increasing in momentum 
the past several years, with Kraft making especially heavy strides. 

• For economic reasons the manufacturer of such a product has to be a big user of I 
oils to start off with. 

• The sell must accent the fact that the oil can also be used for cooking. 

• Brand currently dominating the market are Wesson, Snowdrift and Mazola, with thel 
olive oil brands also an important factor. 

sponsor • 25 JULY I960 1 



I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Despite a hard pitch from ABC TV, H. J. Heinz has decided to renew its daytime 
alliance with NBC TV : in fact, it's going from four to five quarter hours a week. 
The contract, placed with Maxon, will run around $3 million a year. 

To bring you up to date on what the average advertiser is spending for a nighttime 
half -hour on the tv networks : 

ABC TV, $57,000, 130 stations; CBS TV, $68,000, 175 stations, NBC TV, $69,000, 
175 stations. 

Outside of ABC TV, there's no way of arriving at an average daytime expenditure 
per quarter-hour. The discount and other variables are too great. For instance, on NBC TV 
the span can be anywhere from $23,000 to $7,500 per quarter-hour. 

Because of the way ABC TV's discounts and program prices are geared, the average cost 
per-quarter hour can be calculated at $8,400, time and talent. 

Average daytime hookups: ABC TV, 100 stations; CBS TV and NBC TV, 150 sta- 
tions. 

It looks as though CBS TV will fall far short of its goal of $3 million in sponsor- 
ship billings from the Summer Olympics. 

With ll-16ths sold up to this week the tally is around $1.5 million. In its drive to clear 
off the Olympics shelf CBS TV has introduced something new for that network: it's offering 
the balance in a package of four commercial minutes. The price depends on where the 
minutes are placed. 

The current sponsors: Lorillard, a quarter; Wheaties, an eighth; Sandura, a sixteenth 
and Atlantic Refining, a quarter on 35 eastern stations. 

The Olympics start in Italy 25 August. 

Come the end of December and both ABC TV and NBC TV will be locked in 
stiffer sales competition than ever to replace a lot of dropouts from their spot 
carriers. 

These spot carriers are loaded with strictly seasonal accounts, many of them advertisers 
who in previous years put the major part of their chips on selective spot. 

Say some agency people : this situation portends a marked buyers' market for the 
spring seasonals. 

What nudged Brillo (JWT) into making that night and day dispersion deal with 
ABC TV: SOS' heavy use of nighttime in network and spot. 

In addition to a daytime quarter-hour (that is, three minutes a week), Brillo will par- 
ticipate in spot carriers. It had been spending $1 million a year for daytime only on 
NBC TV. The billing at ABC TV will run about $1.25 million. 

Interesting for the record is the fact that as the tv networks have expanded their 
night-time competition these two things have taken place: 

1) The spread between the top-rated and bottom-rated shows has become narrower. 

2) The number of shows in the middle range (15-30% of the audience) have relatively 
become greater. 

Using the Nielsen second March reports for each of the years, you get this rating trend 

picture for evening program : 

rating levels 1957 1958 1959 1960 

Over 30 22% 9% 7% 7% 

15-20 57% 71% 73% 69% 

Under 15 21% 20% 20% 24% 

No. Programs 130 128 123 130 

Note: Tending to throw the trend off in 1960 is the fact that all the networks were filling in 

the marginal time: meaning, unusually low-rated shows. 

• 25 july 1960 21 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Latest sharp tilt in tv network prestige and standing: NBC TV": capture of topi 
audience place in the coverage of the Democratic convention. 

The margin of difference over CBS TV, former kingpin in such sweepstakes, was sc 
where around 40%. That is, according to Arbitron. 

What the smash success of the Huntley-Brinkley team is expected to lead to al 
CBS TV News : a measure of change in style among the network's big news guns. Less 
treating of everything as highly portentous and serious and more salting of events and 
the people in them with human and puckish perspective. 

A tipoff as to how much CBS is concerned by this popularity switch : it's asking in many 
quarters just what was it that went wrong and gave NBC the edge. 



Talk about marathon presentations, McCann-Erickson International appears to 
have set a new record. 

The entire story of its world-wide operation, as now being pitched to prospects, rati 
four and a half hours. 



Judging from the say-so of accountmen in New York agencies, the beer industry hai 
been enjoying a record first six months. 

The increase in barrelage is expected to show at least 3% over the initial six monthi 
of 1959, which was also a record half. 



: 



Spot tv was on the receiving end of a couple sharp cutbacks last week, both out 
of the Bates shop. 

The dimensions of the retreat: Colgate Dental Cream to virtually a rateholding 
position; Carter's Pills in a clean sweep. Arrid was affected on those schedules where it 
alternated with the pills. 

The dentifrice schedules are due back in the f all, but there's an impression the Carter, 
pullbacks may have this motivation: remodeling the commercials as a result of the FTC 
critiques. 

This is a sort of telling week between Nielsen on one side and CBS TV and 
NBC TV on the other: they're meeting to try to iron out their differences over a ne* 
contract. 

Commitments run out at the end of this month, but the two networks are still 
entitled to the first July reports, due next month, which will show the new 50-mark^ 
ratings and the audience count based on total U. S. homes. 

Should the negotiations fall through, the duo will have to do their fingerpoinl 
from Arbitron solelv. 

A rep thinks he has evolved a way for taking his radio stations off the spol 
when they're offered a schedule at local cardrate by the distributor of a nationa 
product. 

By arrangement with his stations, the rep is immediately advised by phone that sucb 
an offer has been made. 

The rep then contacts the agency on the product. He points out that the agency will It 
adding its commission — usually 1714% — to the local rate, making the total billing ju^l 
about what it costs to buy the time at the national rate. 

If the agency reacts negatively, the rep quickly gives the station the signal to g 
ahead and pick up the business at the local rate. 






For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6a 
Spot Buys, page 51: News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 60: Washington Week, page 55: sponsoi 
Hears, page 58: Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78: and Film-Scope, page 56. 



sponsor • 25 JULY 196 J 



i 


If 


UIXlI 


1 1 



t4 * AT 



IMPACT! 

La the [find of Profituatty I , 



On June 3, this station, as a public service, televised 
a controversial, two and one-half-hour public hearing 
before the Hillsborough County Commissioners — the 
first time live cameras had been permitted in such a 
meeting. 

The people spoke out — some dramatically, others 
with stumbling voices, unskilled in oratory. The pros 
were heard, and the cons. Experts were called and 
presented their crisp testimony. The commissioners 
listened and asked and made their decisions. 

Public reaction was immediate! Calls flooded our 
switchboard. Letters of appreciation poured in. Clubs 
and civic organizations acknowledged this telecast to 
be an unprecedented performance of public service. 
City and County officials thanked us. 

This is typical of the dynamic programing of 
WFLA-TV — and its impact in the land of Profitunity! 
So, if you want sales impact in this big, busy market — 
if you want results as well as ratings — spot your product 
on the sales powerhouse of Florida's west coast — 
WFLA-TV! 

"Informed citiiens 
are the guardians 
and spirit of Democ- 
racy" 

President 



The busy 28-counfy 
including Tampa-St. Petersburg 
Metropolitan Market — blank- 
eted by WFLA-TV. 






Dwight D. Eisenhower 



TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 




'ONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



mt$% 




HALF A BILLION $ 
FOOD MARKET? 

POPULATION 3,179,000 
FOOD SALES $541,043,000. Ex- 
ceeds the twelfth metro market. 

DISTRIBUTION Most food sold in 
the WPTF market is distributed from 
Raleigh warehouses (A & P, Colonial 
Stores, Winn Dixie and Piggly Wiggly 
serve 215 supermarkets from Raleigh). 
Twelve major wholesalers and jobbers, 
17 food brokers, representatives of 
most major food manufacturers, plus 
offices and warehouses or processing 
plants for Swift & Co., Armour, Wil- 
son Co., Kraft Foods, Jesse Jones, 
Continental Baking, Ward Baking, 
American Bakeries, and many others 
are in Raleigh. 

AD COVERAGE WPTF Radio is 
the only single mass medium that 
reaches all of this major food market. 
Over 50% of the homes in the area 
listening to WPTF (NCS#2). 




50,000 WATTS 680 KC 

NBC Ainiioie lor Role.ghDvrham 

and Eoiiem North Carolina 

R. H. Mason, General Manager 

Guj Youngsteadt, Sales Manager 

PETfftS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 

Notionol Reprtitntotivet 



24 





Time buyers 
at work 



Lou Kennedy, media supervisor at Kenyon & Eckhardt. Ne* Yoik 
maintains that the modern agency need is for a balance of talent: 
"We are not playing numbers, numbers, who's got the numbers? Th^ 
most important thing about the placement of a selling messagi 
merely the fact that so many people will be watching or listening) 
To do the total job, every broad- 
cast buyer should be completely 
familiar with the material he is 
placing plus the other facets in- 
volved in the over-all advertising 
campaign. Regular sessions must 
be held where the total creative 
marketing objective is exposed and 
discussed. In such planned broad- 
cast buying, the biggest buys and 
even the smaller ones are all based 
on complete knowledge of the prod- 
uct. You can tell the difference." 

says Kennedy, "when each and every timebuyer is as familiar 
the over-all objectives as he is with rating reports, rate cards, ani 
this week's lead story in sponsor. Timebuying then becomes in aiv 
of itself a creative adjunct to the total marketing concept necessai 
to the performance of an outstanding analytical media operation. 

Harvey Schulman, Monroe Greenthal Co., New York, finds thi 
there's a fair amount of talk these days about the "local rate" situ; 
tion. "It's something I contend with almost every day. The agency 
work for has many motion picture clients and purchases spot rad 
schedules for them. When our clients request spot radio campaigi 
for upcoming releases we go o 
and ask for availabilities from tl 
station reps. At this point the re] 
are asked if their stations ha 
local rates. The answer, usual 
mumbled. '959? of our static 
are one rate, or if they do ha 
local rates they cannot be pu 
chased from New York.' Next, 
client compares the national 
with the local prices. In a majc 
of cases the campaigns can be pu 
chased at a considerable saving T 
the local rate, and as a result most usually are. However, we a J 
constantly approached by reps who urge us to buy saturation caoj 
paigns on a national level. The solution lies with the reps. Tl J 
ought to work it out so short-term campaigns can be bought nation a 
l\. but at rates that compare favorably with the client's local one J 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY Ki 





cum laude!" 

WNEM-TV 
for outstanding 
excellence 
in AMERICA! 





Penobscot Bldg. 
DETROIT 




W NE M -TV 

. . . the only Television Station to win the distinguished 
SCHOOL BELL AWARD in Michigan . . . now joins 5 community- 
minded colleagues in receiving the National Education Asso- 
ciation's coveted SCHOOL BELL AWARD for America! 

Conferred upon WNEM-TV, Channel 5, in recognition of out- 
standing excellence in Education reporting and programming. 



Another outstanding FIRST for WNEM-TV . 
gan's award-winning FIRST VHF Station! 



Eastern Michi- 



WNEM-TV 

serving FLINT • SAGINAW • BAY CITY • MIDLAND 



'ONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 




WHIR&THeVUHe 

SEEK! 



we 



NORFOLK 

PORTSMOUTH 
NEWPORT NEWS 
HAMPTON M»Jtet 

1" 



VIRGINIA'S 
No. I 



TV 
MARKET 



THIS MEANS 

WYECeTY 

Look at these random % of audience 

77 SUNSET STRIP G 59.4% 

STATION "A" 28.0% STATION "B" 12.6% 

SHOCK THEATRE <">ca L ,50.5% 

STATION "A" 23.7% STATION "B" 25.8% 

MAVERICK G 50.2% 

STATION "A" 30.9% STATION "B" 18.9% 

3 STOOGES (local) 49.6% 

STATION "A" 21.9% STATION "B" 28.5% 

HAWAIIAN EYE Q 41.2% 

STATION "A" 26.0% STATION "B"-32.8% 

BOURBON ST. BEAT Q 53.0% 

STATION "A" 17.7% STATION "B" 29.1% 

CHEYENNE e 37.9% 

STATION "A" 32.2% STATION "B" 29.8% 

WYATT EARP e 37.1% 

STATION "A" 34.7% STATION "B" 28.4% 

BLACK SADDLE a 51.6% 

STATION "A" 28.2% STATION "B" 20.0% 



Adjacencies d o open up occasionally 

lii.'".i.'.|.».iim.iMi..ii M 



49th and 
Madison 



So wrong, it's funny 

Your cover ad of July 18 was indeed 
an eye opener. It called to my atten- 
tion (for the first time) that KONO 
had been "clobbered" in the last 
Hooper rating. According to the 
claim of the McLendon Organiza- 
tions we are no longer in business. 

If the picture painted by Mr. Mc- 
Lendon were true, I wonder why I'm 
so happy? KONO Radio has been 
first in all of the following categories 
for three years: Ratings (Hooper and 
Pulse), business (local and national), 
respect and admiration of the com- 
munity in every phase of our opera- 
tion. 

To get down to the basics of this 
question, the following are the 
Hooper ratings for McLendon and 
KONO: 

May-June, 1960: KONO— morning. 
31.6: afternoon, 33.1. McLendon — 
morning, 27.9: afternoon 30.4. June- 
July. 1960: KONO— morning, 35.6; 
afternoon, 32.3. McLendon — morn- 
ing. 28.0: afternoon, 34.7. 

As you might well imagine, I'm 
thinking of canceling my subscrip- 
tion to Playboy and depending en- 
tirely for the humor in sponsor mag- 
azine. 

Jack Ross 

pres.-gen. mgr. 

KONO 

San Antonio 

Branching out 

On 18 July one of the nation's largest 
newspapers, the Miami Herald (sec- 
ond largest in advertising carried, 
second largest in news print carried) 
begins sponsorship of a most unique 
radio program: Miami at Night. With 
this, the Miami Herald will also spon- 
sor WCKR's All Night News Service. 
The gross price of this contract is 
close to $60,000. 

This program has a unique ap- 
proach for a newspaper to advertise 
itself on radio. The commercial con- 
tents, and the way the program will 



be handled, both musically and by th< 
personality, makes this program wor 
thy of recognition in the industry 
is most unusual, you will agree, that 
a newspaper will spend this kind 
money on a radio budget, so you cam 
well imagine how effective the pro- 
gram must have been to convince the 
management of the Miami Herald tc 
go ahead with WCKR's Miami 
Night. 

Pardon us if we feel that we might 
well have started a trend for other 
newspapers to follow. 

Alan Henry 
station mana^t 
WCKR 
Miami 



Quote you? 
We would like your permission to re 
produce pages 33 and 34 ("Commer 
cials: admen pitch the year's best 
from the 28 May I960 issue of SPO: 
sor magazine. 

Our affiliates in Canada. Hen 
Burlev & McDonald, won one of th 
tv awards at the first annual Tv Corn 
mercials Festival Luncheon on M; 
20, and we would like to incorporate 
the pages in a four-page promoti< 
piece. 

Florence K. Watt 

Henri, Hurst & McDonald. // 

Chicago 

• SPONSOR is happy to grant reprint p 
be requested in writing and proper credit 



Congrats! 

The article on the Steel Hour, as 
appeared in the June 27th issue 
sponsor, was most gratefully receiv 
by all concerned in our organizatic 
and we're quite appreciative of the ; 
tention given to the story. Yo 
writer did a thorough, probing a 
thoughtful job on a subject that sui 
lv had mam complications. 
James E. Hagen 
United States Steel Co 

N.y.c. 



They loved us in 

Atlanta 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Dallas-Ft.Worth 

Des Moines -Ames 

Detroit 

Houston 

Indianapolis 

Kansas City 

Memphis 

Miami 

Minneapolis -St. Paul 

Nashville 

New York 

Omaha 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

St. Louis 

San Antonio 

Washington, D. C. 





Average Share of 
Audience * 


ABC-TV 


37.1 











ABC Television e 



•Basis: Nielsen 24 Market TV Report, 3 network share of 24 market audience, 2 weeks ending July 10, 1960, 8-10:30 P. M., Monday through Sunday 

'Onsor • 25 july 1960 27 





£**rf 



(Just a matter of Relativity) 

► WBTY-CHARLOTTE IS FIRST TV MARKET IN ENTIRE SOUTHEAST WITH 596,600 TV HO 

i WBTY DELIVERS 43% MORE TELEVISION HOMES THAN CHARLOTTE STATION "B"** 

*Teh vision Magaziru - May 1960 
**NCS = 



JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 

UIBTV 

CHANNEL 3 ® CHARLOTTE 

Represented nationally by CBS Television Spot Sales 



.ET'S COMPARE MA 


RKETS 


WBTY — CHARLOTTK 


596.60( 


ATLANTA 


576.30C 


MIAMI 


510,8« 


MEMPHIS 


• 


LOUISVILLE 


459.4M 


BIRMINGHAM 


429,4<X 


NEW ORLEANS 




NASHVILLE 


34S.CKK 


NORFOLK-PORTSMOUTH 


341.5W 


RICHMOND 


273.90C 



^ SPONSOR 

2 5 JULY 1960 



NEW $25 MILLION TV TREND 

-Sponsored public service programs up 300% 



Tv networks report exciting rise 
n sales of sponsor-backed informa- 
ion and public service programing 
with 14 advertisers already signed 

This week, as fall tv schedules at ABC, 
£BS, and NBC assumed final shakedown 
Status, sponsor editors spotted and 
olotted a healthy and exciting new trend 
n tv programing that seems bound to 
lave a profound influence on the me- 
lium's future. 

Beginning in October, the three tv net- 
works will have over 300% more adver- 
iser-paid-for programs of an informa- 
ional, educational, and public service 
lature than ever before in tv history. 

sponsor estimates of advertiser invest- 
ments in this type of network programing 
for the coming season range from $23 to 
$25 million, and according to John 



8,362,000 SAW 'EXPLOSION' 




THAT CREATIVE public service programing can 

reach substantial audiences is shown by record of Popu- 
lation Explosion on CBS TV. Program ivas seen in 
7,031,000 homes on original showing, 8.362.000 homes 
on expanded repeat. Four CBS Reports reached a 
"selective audience'' of 19 million unduplicated homes. 



karol. v.|i. for special projects sales 
at CBS TV the possibilities for ex- 
panding this sponsored public service 
market are "still untapped." 

\\ ith the spate of specials declin- 
ing from the 1959-60 flood level, and 
with some critics complaining that 
the fall fare of regular entertainment 
shows looks like the "same old tired 
western, action and adventure formu- 
la" the emergence of serious spon- 
sored programing looms as easily the 
brightest spot on the new tv spectrum. 

Reasons for the upswing of adver- 



tiser interest in informational, edu- 
cational documentary, and other pub- 
lic service shows seem threefold: 

• More creative programing by 
network packagers 

• More creative selling by network 
sales departments 

• More creative buying, especially 
by top level executives in advertiser 
and agency organizations. 

Last fall's quiz scandals and wide- 
spread criticism of television's pro- 
gram imbalance undoubtedly stirred 
feverish activity in serious program 



KEY FIGURES IN NEW TV TREND 




Typical of high level corporate management 
okaying tv public service sponsorship is 
Charles H. Percy, pres. Bell & Howell Co. 



Specialized selling of public service time 
and program packages for CBS-TV is headed 
by John Karol, v. p. for special projects. 




PRODUCER 



Veteran producer-specialist in the field, Irving 
Gitlin, left CBS this past spring to head 
the public service development at NBC TV 






Expanding public service programing de- 
mands new talent, even famed Sir Winston, 
III be on ABC TV 



building at all three of the networks, 

The so-called "Doerfer agreement" 
last winter, under which the three 
nets agreed with the ex-FCC chair- 
man's request to schedule at least an 
hour a week of public service pro- 
graming in prime evening time, fo 
cused executive attention on th« 
problem. 

But the rise of documentaries and 
other types of informational shows as 
a major factor in sponsored tv, owes 
as much to new creative selling meth' 
ods and high-level policy buying by 
agencies and advertisers as to any 
other pressures. 

This fall 14 major corporations 
will have substantial investments 
public service network tv, and the list 
seems likely to grow. 

At ABC, Bell & Howell which last 
year co-sponsored CBS Reports with 
Goodrich, has purchased a $950,000 
public service package which calls for 
five one-hour, and 10 half-hour in- 
formational programs and co-spon 
sorship of a half-hour Sunday night 
series based on the memoirs of Sir 
Winston Churchill. 

Also at ABC the "Doerfer agree 
ment" structure will see a weekly half 
hour documentary titled Expedition 
which will be sponsored two out of 
each three weeks by Ralston Purina. 
Each third week the program will be 
produced (and undoubtedly spon- 
sored) locally. Advertiser investment 
in this show may top $1,750,000. 

CBS TV, which leads all three nets 
with more than $15 million in spon- 
sored public service billing (time and 
talent), has seven separate projects on 
the books. 

CBS Reports which last year scored 
with Biography of a Missile and Pop- 
ulation Explosion, has been expanded 
to 26 full hours for the season (com- 
pared with nine in 1959-60). The 
network has a commitment from Olin 
Mathieson for a substantial number 
of these documentaries, and may ha\e 
the whole series sold before this i 
sue of sponsor is published. 

Last year, the first four broadcas 
of CBS Reports reached an avera< 
audience of 8,315,000 homes and 
total unduplicated audience of IS 
580,000 homes. CBS points proud 
to the fact that this "selective aud 
ence" tops the circulation of Li 
magazine on a per homes per broai 



25 JULY 196)1 



ast basis, and the combined circula- 
ion of quality magazines — Time, 
Vewsweek, Fortune, National Geo- 
graphic, Atlantic, Harpers, U. S. 
Veivs and World Report. 

At the network, production of CBS 
Reports is under a department of CBS 
Vews headed by Fred Friendly. Pro- 
gram costs per episode are $100,000 
. vith time costs ranging from $110.- 
l)00 to $120,000. 

i Eyewitness to History becomes a 
weekly half hour. Sponsor is Fire- 
stone which is showing as much en- 
:husiasm for this "News Story of the 
Week" show as it ever did for its 
much lamented Voice of Firestone 
program. The tire company's invest- 
ment in Eyeivitness is estimated at 
$5,000,000. 

Face the Nation, another weekly 
half hour has been sold to Schick for 
la special Christmas drive following 
the Elections, at an estimated $750,- 
000. Another "Doerfer agreement" 
program, Face the Nation will be 
(locally produced (and available for 
(local sponsorship) one week out of 
every four. 

| Tomorrow, an eye popping new sci- 
ence series, produced with the help 
I of Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology (MIT will be celebrating its 
100th anniversary in 1961) will pre- 
sent four hour-long programs built 
: around such subjects as "machines 
that think" and "life on other plan- 
ets." American Machine and Foun- 
dry has purchased two of the four 
'shows, plus a repeat of one, at an 
estimated $800,000. 

Twentieth Century which has be- 
come as much a Prudential landmark 
as Gibraltar, will be back as a weekly 
half hour under the same sponsor- 
i ship. The package represents a $1, 
200,000 expenditure, with the insur- 
ance company getting substantial by- 
product benefits. This past year, 
Prudential men arranged 40,000 out- 
side showings of Twentieth Century 
I programs. 

Completing the CBS TV roster are 
two Leonard Bernstein-N. Y. Phil- 
harmonic series, a group of four chil- 
dren's concerts sponsored by Shell, 
and three or four regular concerts 
I under the Ford imprimatur. The Shell 
| deal figures at $650,000 while the 
Ford sponsorship will probably top 
I $1,500,000. 



1960-61 PUBLIC SERVICE SHOWS 

Program Description Sponsor 




m 

< 


Churchill 
Memoirs 


26 half hours 


Bell & Howell C) 


Expedition 


Weekly half 
hours 


Ralston & local 


Public Service 
Specials 


Five one hours, 
ten half hours 


Bell & Howell 


in 
ID 
O 


CBS Reports 


26 full hours 


Olin Mathieson (*) 


Face the Nation 


Weekly half 
hour 


Schick (*] & Local 


Eyewitness to 
History 


Weekly half 
hour 


Firestone 


Tomorrow 


Four full hours 


American Machine 
& Foundry (*) 


Children's 
Concerts 


Four full hours 


Shell 


Bernstein 
Concerts 


3 or 4, 90 min. 


Ford 


Twentieth 
Century 


Weekly half 
hour 


Prudential 


O 

n 

z 

( 


Project 20 


Two full hours 


Purex (*) 


American 
Heritage 


Seven one hours 


Equitable 


Omnibus 


Six one hours 


Aluminium (*) 


NBC Opera 


Four programs 


Florist Telegraph 


Bell Science 


Four full hours 


Bell Telephone 


•) Partial or additional sponsorshli 


available. 





Activity at NBC TV centers around 
the return of Omnibus as a regular 
feature with Aluminium Ltd. of Can- 
ada already signed for six programs 
at $200,000, and the scheduling of 
seven full hour American Heritage 
shows under the sponsorship of Equi- 
table Life for a $1,800,000 tab. 

Another NBC sponsor, Purex, will 
back two Project 20 nighttime pub- 
lic service specials and seven day- 
time specials, supervised by Irving 
Gitlin, who joined NBC this spring as 
executive producer, creative proj- 
ects, NBC News and Public Affairs, 
after 14 years at CBS. The Purex ap- 
propriation for these 12 programs 
will top $450,000. 

Also on NBC TV will be an esti- 



mated four new programs in the Bell 
Science series (cost $1,200,000) and 
four full length operas sponsored by 
Florist Telegraph Delivery service 
($450,000). 

Not included in these listings are a 
number of other program series at 
each of the three networks which 
might be considered as "sponsored 
public service" under a looser defi- 
nition of the term. For example, the 
Hallmark Hall of Fame. 

However, for a clearer picture of 
the new trend, we have limited our 
listings to those given above. 

One other large segment of spon- 
sored public service deserves mention 
nevertheless. This is the Convention- 
campaign-Election coverage which has 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



alread) attracted I I advertisers, and 
baa been topped b\ the Westinghouse 
expenditure of $6,000,000 for the CBS 
TV package. 

Ml in all. the surge toward more 
sponsored public service programing 
seems well established on the net- 
works and reports from tv stations 
indicate a pickup on the local level 
too. 

Behind these increases lie some 
significant new developments in t\ 
sales techniques. John Karol, who 
this past winter was transferred from 
his long-time post at CBS Radio to 
the newly created job of v.p. special 
projects at CBS TV, explained the 
new strategy to sponsor. 

"First, this type of informational 
programing is attracting new adver- 
tisers to tv. Our prospect list is not 
the Top 100 tv advertisers but the 
Top 100, or 500 American corpora- 
tions, in terms of sales and assets. 
And mam have never been in tv 
before. 

"Second, we realize that in selling 
these programs, we have a different 
kind of sale. We must get through to 
top-level policv making executives at 
both client and agency organizations. 
Men who are concerned with over-all 
public relations and corporate image 
building, not merely with responsi- 
bility for low-cost-per- 1,000 tv buy- 
ing. 

"Third, we stress the selective audi- 
ence for these shows, not merely box 
car numbers. We estimate that the 
potential audience for public service 
programing is at least 40% of all tv 
homes — and it is the upper 40' ( 
— the decision makers — that they 
reach." 

Typical of the comments of adver- 
tisers who agree with this type of tv 
thinking are those of Peter G. Peter- 
son, exec. v.p. Bell & Howell: "Such 
programing is unusually selective in 
reaching our best prospects . . . and 
we feel that the scope of our ABC spe- 
( ial public service programs offers us 
a combination of in-depth and pres- 
tige documentary programing unlike 
anything ever done on television." 

W ith such enthusiastic support 
from leading advertisers and with 
network ami stations geared to more 
energetic sale efforts, sponsor looks 
for the sponsored public service field 
to expand with almost the same mush- 
rooming speed as has tv sports. ^ 

:\2 




TV BEEFS UP bottler's high-powered introduction of 1 2-ounce bottle to the New York 
Itet. As in year-round radio campaign, N.Y. Coke aims appeal primarily at youth markel 



GIANT-SIZE RADIO 
FOR COKE OF N.Y. 

^ Bottler dominates medium with $1,600,000 spread 
' over 42 area stations in '59; notches record sales year, 

^ Current $100,000-a-week campaign, launching 12-1 
ounce bottle, brings in tv, print to show new package 



I he Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of 
New York doesn't leave much spot 
radio time for competitors in the cur- 
rent >l00.()()0-a-week campaign intro- 
ducing the 12-ounce bottle to its 
region. 

Though radio accounts for only a 
third of the outlay in this drive, 
launched 27 June and expected to 
run well over six weeks, the world's 

» biggest bottler is still dominating the 
medium. Radio expenditures con- 
tinue at about the same rate as last 
year when New York Coke poured in 
31.600,000 or 80% of that ad budget. 
Radio dominance is a strategy 
mainstav for this supplier of over 

! 18,000,000 people via 17 plants in a 
three-state area where it ranks first in 
total sales. It maintains year-round 
barrage- over a 10-station lineup in 

j the city and neighboring New Jersey, 
Long Island, upstate New York, and 
Connecticut communities. Tv and 
print were added for the present all- 



out campaign to lend visual dimen- 
sion to introduction of the new pack- 
age size, and it is not unlikely the 
when this phase ends, they will dro 
back to minority status. 

In 1959, with 80% of its ad budg. 
in radio, New York Coke had a bai 
ner year. Sales were at a record higl 
with $32 million gross, §3.5 millio 
after taxes. Other success trapping' 
a stock split; a 4% stock dividend i 
addition to regular dividends, and fo 
ward strides toward admission to th 
New York Stock Exchange. 

New York Coke's spot radio inves 
ment, though limited to the New Yor 
region, is equal to that of the 16t 
place advertiser in RAB's list of 1C 
top spenders in the medium last yea 
most of which are national account 
The bottler's heavy use of radio got 
back to 1952, so over the years it h; 
built seniority and therefore greatt 
assurance of choice time-slots. '"Thei 
are only a certain number of prirr 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY 196 



lours, and the combination of New 
fork Coke's radio buys and related 
rand protection allowances leaves 
'epsi with little to choose," points out 
tuart D. Watson, board chairman of 
few York Coke's agency, McCann- 
larschalk. 
Coke's radio spots, mostly 60's and 
i's, range from nearly 100 exposures 
week via some New York City sta- 
ions to a minimum of 30 in the 
mallest outlying sections, with the 
verage at about CO. They are aimed 
rimarily at teenagers, but the en- 
ire family is of significance in the 
uying strategy. Early morning and 
p.m. slots are utilized during the 
•veek, with exposure extending later 
1 nto the night over weekends. 

The bottler is on nine major sta- 
ions in New York City. In addition 
here is a strong pitch to certain eth- 
lic groups there over WWRL (Negro 
ind Spanish I; WHOM (Spanish); 
WEVD I Spanish and Jewish) ; WLIB 
i Negro I: and WNJR, Newark (Ne- 
?ro). Coke looks toward improved 



sales among the many who show a 
preference for the 12-ounce bottle now 
that it's entering the field. A Spanish- 
language version of the jingle has 
been created to aid this cause. 

Outlying communities, in addition 
to receiving signals of New York sta- 
tions, are exposed to the Coke mes- 
sage over the local outlets. In 
Long Island, stations in Riverhead, 
Patchogue. Huntington, Freeport, and 
Hempstead carry the commercials. 
The New Jersey lineup includes As- 
bury Park, New Brunswick. Trenton, 
and Paterson. 

With so lengthy a station lineup 
and so formidable a spot schedule, 
New York Coke falls heir to a rich 
and varied fortune in merchandising 
assistance from the stations. There 
are billboards, mailings to the chains, 
and provisions are made for extensive 
in-store display. And in some of the 
smaller communities Coke is publi- 
cized on highway posters, at teenager 
dances, on the backs of benches at 
bus stops, and on Top 40 record 



sheets. McCann-Marschalk officials 
visit all of the stations in order to 
make the most of available merchan- 
dising. 

For the tv portion of its "king-size" 
bottle campaign, New York Coke is 
on six stations in the city which de- 
liver a total of 65 spots a week. In 
prime time the bottler utilizes 20- 
second spots, while 60's are used in 
conjunction with the local youth mar- 
ket programs. The prime time spots 
are at their heaviest frequency 
Wednesday through Friday, in keep- 
ing with the shopping pattern. The 
youth market program spots are 
spread over the entire week. 

New York Coke and its account 
people at McCann-Marschalk are firm 
believers in use of the jingle on radio 
and tv. Estimates are that last year's 
radio jingle hit the air over 90,000 
times. A new jingle has been de- 
veloped for the king-size Coke cam- 
paign which occupies the major por- 
tion of the e.t.'s and provides voice 
(Please turn to page 46) 



LAUNCHED in New York is Coke's 12-ounce bottle, held by Stuart D. Watson, bd. chmn., McCann-Marschalk. Seated (I to r) at kick-off dinr 
tleSales Harrison, bd. chmn.. Coca-Cola Bottling Co. (Thomas Div.J; James T. Murray, bd. chmn., N. Y. Coke; Lee Talley, pres. Coca-Cola I 




Spot radio gains with 'featurettes' 



^ 11 sales by Adam Young firm of spot-and-program 
vignettes show appeal and plus value of the device 

^ Under-two-minute combination of message and pro- 
gram featurette praised by spot agencies, advertisers 




PRESENTATION by Adam Young of latest radio spot-vignettes (interrupted briefly for pho- 
tography) at Wesley Assoc. Participating in session (I to r): Steve Machinski, exec v. p., Young; 
Joe Knap, media dir., and Jay Perine, a.e., both of Wesley; and Don Chapman from Young 



^Concentrating on an idea that is 
not entirely new in radio spot, but 
giving it a specialized drive by its 
new creative services division, the 
Adam Young firm, station representa- 
tive, has come up with a sales record 
for "spot featurettes" that seems to 
prove the appeal of spot-and-program 
combinations. 

Eleven radio advertisers so far are 
using the Young vignettes, and more 
are under consideration by national 
agencies and advertisers. 

A SPONSOR check revealed consid- 
erable enthusiasm by timebuyers and 
ad managers for the plus values they 
are deriving from having their an- 



nouncements placed within a "pro- 
gram frame." 

The Young vignettes, which run 
two minutes or less, employ standard 
program elements, available at nearly 
all stations. They are designed to 
establish "instant" favorable environ- 
ment for the spot — an answer to the 
often thorny problem of how to in- 
tegrate spots with the short-duration 
music and news programing preva- 
lent today. The programing portion 
of each vignette is geared to attract 
the audience segment appropriate for 
the advertiser, thus "setting them up" 
for the spot. 

Shulton, finding this added dimen- 



sion to spot quite attractive, has 
purchased schedules of featurettes for 
its Old Spice line of men's toiletries: 
Bronzetan (both Wesley Associates) 
and Ice-O-Derm (Ralph Allum). 

'"\\ itfa the Old Spice jingle a popu- 
lar and easily recognized signature 
for Shulton's men's line, we were 
looking for a way to get increased 
impact on the consumer's ear," says 
Jay Perine, Shulton a.e. at Wesley. 
"The featurettes offered just such an 
opportunity." 

The Old Spice promotion is cen- 
tered around human interest and lo- 
cal color, appropriately enough titled. 
"The Spice of Life." The featurettes 
are currently scheduled on 14 sta- 
tions in as many markets and Wesley 
is reportedly giving favorable consid- 
eration to expanding the series to 
many of its other markets. 

Perhaps the Shulton story best 
demonstrates the flexibility of the 
plan. During the warmer weather. 
Shulton uses it to promote its sun 
lotion, Bronzetan. For Bronzetan the 
feature part of the spot concerns it- 
self with weather and travel tips. The 
format here is more closely allied to 
a public sen ice presentation, for the 
travel tips include suggestions on in- 
viting vacation areas, describe the 
best routes to get there, offer safety 
hints and so forth. In addition to the 
regular commercial, Bronzetan gets a 
billboard at the opening and closing 
of the featurette. 

Joe Knap, media director at Wes- 
ley, feels that the extra impact and 
mileage added by the featurettes 
makes them well worth the small 
premium. He also feels that these 
"spots" could be merchandized just 
like regular programs. 

The Ice-O-Derm schedule ran 
through the spring. "We were quite 
impressed with it and so was the 
client," says Kennett McMath. a.e. 
and v.p. at Ralph Allum. "They're a 
terrific advantage to the advertiser." 

In this case, Ice-O-Derm was pri- 
marily interested in a young adult au- 
dience. The feature, tailored to suit, 
bears the title "Tops-in-Pops." The 
advertiser was billboarded as present- 



25 july 1960 



ig a top-hit tune, and also received 
•illboard credit along with running 
is commercial. McMath points out 
hat this all serves to build up and 
et off the commercial as well as get 
he product name mentioned several 
'•.dditional times. 
While Ice-O-Derm is taking a sum- 



turettes, "a real good value." The 
buyer feels it's as worthwhile as spon- 
sorship of a small program. The fea- 
ture is entitled, "Champion Spark 
Plugs Sports Flashes," thus getting 
the product name right up front. The 
content is designed to be specifically 
attractive to males, and is also pub- 



how Don Chapman, creative services 
director at Young sums up the for- 
mat. The featurettes open with a bill- 
board which tells the audience what's 
coming and who is bringing it to 
them. This alerts the targeted audi- 
ence segment that something of par- 
ticular interest to them is on its way. 



HOW ADVERTISERS ARE USING SPOT VIGNETTES 

ADVERTISER & ACENCY FEATURETTE TITLE FORMAT 


SPRING 

CIGARETTES 

(Lennen & Newell) 


Spring-time & 
Temperature 


With Spring jingle as background opening billboard 
states that time and temperature are presented by 
Spring. They are followed by Spring spot 


OLD SPICE 

(Wesley Assoc.) 


Spice of Life 


Opening billboard connects Old Spice wth "Spice 
of Life." About 20 seconds of human interest 
story material precede spot and billboard 


COUNTRY CLUB Great Moments in 
MALT BEER Negro Music 

(John Shaw, Chicago) 


Billboard is followed by music of all-time Negro 
greats designed to attract Negroes without alien- 
ating others. It's followed by spot and billboard 


ICE-O-DERM 
SKIN CREAM 

(Richard Allum) 


Tops-In-Pops 


Account is billboarded as sponsoring one of three 
top popular records, for young adult appeal. After 
record comes spot and closing billboard 


SCHILLING 
COFFEE 

(Beaumont & Holman) 


Hi Neighbor 


Spot is preceded by invitation to audience to vote 
for best neighbor, specifying reasons. Prize goes 
each week to neighbor judged best 


CHAMPION 
SPARK PLUGS 

(J. Walter Thompson) 


Sports Flashes 


Insures close attention to spot by the male audi- 
ence to which it is addressed by preceding it with 
latest news from the world of sports 



m, 



mer hiatus, all current indications 
point to picking up the "Tops-in- 
Pops" program in the fall. 

Champion spark plugs first started 
using the featurettes in the fall of 
1959 on one or two stations, and has 
been expanding since. Bob Gorby, 
timebuyer at Champion's agency, J. 
Walter Thompson, calls the fea- 



lic service in nature, thus performing 
a dual service for the advertiser. 

Other advertisers who have pur- 
chased featurettes include Country 
Club malt beer, Piels beer, Newport 
cigarettes, Spring cigarettes, Schilling 
coffee, and Kiwi shoe polish. 

"Capture their attention — slam 'em 
with the e.t. — then ease off." That's 



Then follows the program material 
itself filling anywhere from 10 sec- 
onds to a minute, depending on the 
type of material selected for the ad- 
vertiser. The transcribed commercial 
comes next, and at its completion the 
final billboard reminds listeners of 
the advertiser who brought them the 
(Please turn to page 46) 



sponsor • 25 JULY 1960 



35 



Is your tv show reaching buyers? 



^ Trendex introduces system of correlating program 
selectors and sponsor identification with purchasing 

^ Long-held suspicion that sales are better when 
women are 'involved' in tv program is documented 



^% major step designed to put '"rat- 
ings in the perspective where they be- 
long" and to depart from the num- 
bers game is being appraised by 
agency people and advertisers as thev 
examine results of a new Trendex 
survey of brand purchase. 

The above quote is from the re- 



search organization's vice president 
in charge of sales. Eugene L. Reillv. 
He contends that this new survey of 
program selectivity and sponsor iden- 
tification in relation to purchase 
points to one way in which buyers 
can do what they say they want to do 
— get away from the numbers. 



The special Trendex studv indi 
cafes the following: 

• That homes in which women were 
the primary factor in the selection of 
a tv program — ranging from west 
ems to dramas — had a 52' < bettei 
buying record for the sponsor's pim 
uct advertised on that same show than 
did homes where women were not th< 
decisive persons in program selects . 

• That sales ranged 50^ hijihe 
in homes where some member of th< 
household could identifv the sponsor 
than in the homes where there was not 
this company or brand identification. 

The implications of these figure- 
may document what manv advertisers 



HOW PRODUCT PURCHASING RELATES TO PROGRAM 
SELECTION AND SPONSOR IDENTIFICATION ON VIDEO 

Percent of households viewing show which purchased products advertised 

Where there teas a female selector for the program: 



34.9 



ff here there teas a non-female selector for the program : 



122.9 



Where there teas correct sponsor identification 



42.8 



Where there teas incorrect sponsor identification : 



28.5 



A Trendex survey of five tv programs in 305 homes during June 1960 uncovered the above information. Fe- 
rn-ale selector means there ivas a viewing home in which an adult female by herself or in conjunction with 
others chose the program. There were 143 female selector homes in the test; 162. non-female. Sponsor iden- 
tification refers to either sponsor's name or brand. There were 69 correct sponsor identification homes. In- 
correct identification refers to misidentification and "don't knoii" answers. There were 236 of these homes. 



SPONSOR • 25 JLLY 196< 



nd agencies have long suspected: ' 
hat a preference for a certain show 
elates directly to (a) sponsor identi- 
ication and then to (b) sales. 

The "female selector" factor is un- I 
elated to audience composition. For 
:xample, a Western may have a 60% 
nale and a 40% female audience. 
3ut if the person in the household 
( .vho influences the tune-in to that 
western is an adult woman, who 
therefore controls much of the family 
(buying power, the advertiser may 
,well be more interested in who selects 
the show than who watches it. 

Trendex calls this process "involve- j 
iment" of the viewer in the program. 
^And it's this "involvement" which • 
lead? to patterns which indicate a 
dramatically higher record of prod- 
uct sale in the household where a 
woman selects the program and 
where the respondent can identify • 
the sponsor. This is the assertion of 
Mr. Reilly, and it's one which is j 
claiming the attention of buyers as \ 
they seek data apart from pure "head" 
[lor "nose" counts. 

Trendex surveyed 305 homes by 
telephone last month to check for : 
these data on five programs (the com- 
posite results are shown in the adja- 
cent chart) : if the specific program 
had been seen on television, if an 
adult woman or adult man had the 
primary influence in the selection of j. 
the program, whether the home could 
correctly identify the sponsor. 
'■ The answers to these questions 
were correlated with answers to a 
further question : What was the brand 
last purchased (in the product class j 
of five advertisers surveyed) ? 

The conclusions, says Mr. Reilly, 
show an overwhelming purchase ad- ! 
vantage among the households where u 
a woman was the primary influence ; 
in the tune-in to the specific program 
and in those homes where sponsor 
identification was high. 

Three of the five individual pro- 
gram surveys which were averaged in- 
to these composite figures show the 
following: 

Breakfast food: Sponsoring a 
western, this product found 12 % 
more sales among the female selector 
viewing homes (19.0%) than among 
the non-female selector homes (8.6%). 
And the product was reported as the 
* Please turn to page 76) 



'CHUTIST JUMPS— CAMERA ROLLS 




TENSE MOMENTS in Lee Wright's fall are caught above in stills from Champlin Oil's filmed 
spot. Above he's shown about to jump, then futilely trying to reach release ring with left hand. 
Below, only 750 feet from ground, he catches ring with right hand, "chuting safely rest of way 

TV COMMERCIAL STUNT 
TAKES UNFORESEEN TACK 



Iwlidwestern tv viewers are cur- 
rently seeing a close grapple with 
death in a new one-minute spot — 
though most of them don't know it. 

The commercial, created and pro- 
duced for Champlin Oil & Refining 
Co. of Ft. Worth, by its agency Tracy- 
Locke, is one of a year-old series 
featuring sports stars from the Mid- 
west, and tying in with the company 
theme, "A Great Name in the Great 
Plains." 

Unique thing about it is that for the 
first time, the facial expressions of a 
parachutist during his descent have 
been captured on film. 

But the startling and completely 
unexpected development concerns 
what happened when sky diver Lee 
Wright lived though some terrifying 
moments during his fall because he 
couldn't reach his release ring. 

The adventure-packed drama began 
the second Wright jumped from a 
small cruising plane at some 3,500 
feet. A special harness and system of 



braces supported the movie camera 
attached to his chest, which was 
positioned to focus sharply on his 
face all during the fall. 

Plans called for Wright to drop 
about 1,500 to 2.000 feet before open- 
ing his parachute, but when the time 
came and he reached up with his left 
hand to pull the release ring, he 
found he couldn't overcome the iner- 
tia of his fall. 

The production crew below watched 
with mounting terror, as he plum- 
meted toward the ground, struggling 
to bring his left arm up. 

Then, with less than 750 feet of 
altitude left, Wright managed to work 
his right hand up to the ring. In an- 
other moment the chute billowed out 
above him and the crew below- 
breathed a chorused sigh of relief. 

Accompanying the Champlin spot 
is the narrated line . . . "adventure 
mirrored on his face," but viewers 
who look closely will see much more 
than just adventure there. ^ 



sponsor • 25 JULY 1960 



New interest in radio's Mast word 



^ New areas of prime time emerging as surveys show 
increase in nighttime shopping and driving to market 

^ Admen recognize am's ability to deliver final ad 
message but wait for improved out-of-home measurement 



■ madios acknowledged ability to 
deliver a precious last advertising 
message to the consumer before she 
shops is getting more attention these 
days from admen. But, so far, the 
weight of this quality has not had 
much impact on agency buying prac- 
tices. 

While agencymen are not overlook- 
ing the importance of shifting shop- 
ping habits, long-established time- 
buying habits — particularly the en- 
trenched emphasis on cost-per- 1,000 
— still hold sway. The lack of solid 
factual out-of-home measurement is 
cited as the big drawback to change. 

Admen concede the point that 
leaching a woman just before she 
shops is bound to have some effect 
on which product is chosen. But they 
are not sure exactlv what, and want 



to see more definitive research on the 
subject. There are also some wearv 
comments that they are tired of sift- 
ing through some marketing studies 
that seem superficial and sometimes 
spurious; and they want to see radio 
presentations that tell them what they 
don't know, backed up by facts. 

There is little doubt that a new way 
of life is emerging in this country 
which has greatly affected shopping 
and buying habits. With more money, 
more married working women, short- 
er working hours and more leisure 
time, new interests have altered estab- 
lished value scales and time schedules. 

Of particular interest to media men 
and advertisers are the evolving shop- 
ping patterns, evident in study after 
study, that will set the trend for the 
decade of the 1960's and beyond: 



• Later shopping hour? with hea 
emphasis on evenings. 

• Greater impulsiveness in buyin 
less brand loyalty and more in-stoi 
decisions. 

• Fewer shopping trips per weel 
and the concentration of buying inl 
fewer hours. 

• A breakdown of "categories 
Couples shop together; men buy <jro< 
eries, women buy gasoline. 

• More and more travel to th 
stores by automobile. 

A spot check of agency timebuyer 
reveals a willingness on their part U 
accept the conclusions of recent shop 
ping studies but no rush to alter th 
usual buving patterns. Most are not 
ready to switch from the cost-pei 
1,000 and prefer to buy. as one put it. 
"any time during the day. with em- 
phasis on the 8 a.m. to noon hours. ' 
For gasoline and automobile clients 
they stick to "prime driving times.'" 

"You can't blame the timebuyer,' 
Stanley Bloom, director of marketing 
at CBS Spot Sales, advised. "As soon 
as he gets to know his business he's 
moved up to some other post. The 
new man plays it safe and buys the 



ADMEN STRESS NEED FOR IMPROVED MEASUREMENT 



FRANK M. KEMP, v.p. 

and media director of Comp- 
ton (at right), and Bud She- 
rak, v.p. in charge of research 
at K&E (left), acknowledge 
radio's "last word" quality 
but deplore lack of factual 
out-of-home measurement. 
They also criticize some mar- 
keting studies, questioning 
research standards. Accord- 
ing to Kemp, however, "there 
is no reason to doubt radio 
has a big selling point in the 
'last word.' " 





25 .illy 1960 



SOME RESULTS OF "SUPER VALU" SHOPPING STUDY 



% OF CUSTOMERS BY DAY AND HOUR 





Mori. 


Tues. 


Wed. 


Total day 


11.96% 


11.76% 


16.88% 


9-12 


2.44 


2.10 


2.52 


12-3 


2.28 


2.35 


3.12 


3-6 


4.21 


4.52 


6.10 



3.03 



2.79 



5.14 



Total day 


15.73% 


21.42% 


22.25% 


9-12 


2.66 


3.89 


7.26 


12-3 


2.94 


2.94 


6.50 


3-6 


5.02 


6.78 


8.49 


6-9 


5.11 


7.81 


- 



HOW CUSTOMERS GET TO THE MARKET 





All 
Stores 


Stoles 


Suburban 
Stores 


Country 


AUTOMOBILE 


91% 


84% 


98% 


94% 


WALK 


7 


15 


2 


5 


PUBLIC 
TRANSPORTATION 


2 


1 


— 


1 



100% 100% 100% 100% 



HOW FAR CUSTOMERS TRAVEL TO SHOP 

City Stores Suburban Stores Country Stores 



WITHIN V* MILE 


22.3% 


6.0% 


7.2% 


% TO Vi MILE 


29.6% 


9.0% 


14.1% 


Vz TO 1 MILE 


23.8% 


27.6% 


23.2% 


1 TO 2 MILES 


16.1% 


25.5% 


20.1% 


2 TO 4 MILES 


4.7% 


20.6% 


7.8% 


OVER 4 MILES 


3.5% 


11.3% 


27.6% 



100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 

; This section of Progressive Grocer's survey of Super Valu super markets shows heavy shopping on Wednesday, Thurs- 

" day and Friday nights, and on Saturday. Also, the overwhelming statistics of automobile travel over all other methods. 

The six Super Valu stores included in the study are in and around Minneapolis. Pioneer report covered 12 weeks in '57. 



numbers, certainly not qualitatively. 
Who, then, should educate the time- 
buyer? Bloom conceded that it should 
partly be the function of the repre- 
sentative firm's salesman, but he is in 
turn hampered by the lack of qualita- 
tive out-of-home research to match 
with the marketing surveys. 

Presentations such as Radio Ad- 
vertising Bureau's "precious last 
word" study are very helpful, Bloom 
tid. This report points to radio's 
mobility in conquering the "forget- 
fulness factor" (consumers forget up 
to 40% of incidental information 
they've just learned in 20 minutes, 
up to 64% in nine hours) by getting 

I'm the last selling message. RAB's 
conclusions: 
Supermarket customers get the last 
word from radio 61.6% of the time; 
23.8% from television, 11.9% from 

Sponsor • 25 july 1960 



newspapers and 3.2% from maga- 
zines. Service stations customers 
hear it 61.3% from radio, 15.7% 
from tv, 17.8% from newspapers and 
4.2% from magazines. 

"All things being equal, there is no 
doubt that radio has a big selling 
point here," declared Frank M. Kemp, 
vice president and media director of 
Compton Advertising. "If valid shop- 
ping samplings could be equated with 
explicit out-of-home figures, then we 
would certainly have a doubly good 
reason for putting announcements on 
the air." 

But all things are not equal, accord- 
ing to Kemp. "The last word may 
not always be the decisive word. 
There are other factors like a good tv 
demonstration or a magazine spread. 
Therefore, unless high standards of 
research are met it would be foolish 



to give up a 10 rating for a three. 
Some of the store traffic studies seem 
reasonable and valid," he added, "and 
out-of-home measurements are also a 
real factor in media decisions. But 
they must be more factual. We can't 
buy on faith." 

One of the most respected studies 
is Progressive Grocer's pioneer reporl 
on the Super Valu stores. The maga 
zine's comprehensive study of si> 
supermarkets in and around Minne 
apolis shows that 15% of the custo 
mers for an entire week shop between 
3 and 9 p.m. on Friday, and 37% 
of the week's total from 3 p.m. on 
Friday to 6 p.m. closing on Saturday. 

These are the customers at whom 
an advertiser in that area would aim 
his last word via radio. Would he 
reach them? Progressive Grocer 
counts a weekly average of 91 r r who 

39 



WHO DELIVERS THE PRECIOUS LAST SELLING WORD? 

SUPERMARKET CUSTOMERS SERVICE STATION CUSTOMERS 




Mac nines 22 % 




Magazines 4.2% 



Radio Advertising Bureau figures show radio's ability to deliver the "last word" to super market and service 
station customers. RAB notes that "people forget fast . . . up to 40% of incidental information they've 
just learned in 20 minutes, up to 64% in nine hours, suggests radio to reach greater number of shoppers 



drive to the market in automobiles. 

Shopping times are changing for 
other types of stores, also. Home 
Furnishings Daily reported recently 
that "the most significant current 
trend in the spread of night store 
hours is that developing with rapid 
expansion of discount super market 
department stores all over the nation. 

"The pattern of five, six or even 
seven night openings a week is likely 
to spread in the next year in view of 
the continual mushrooming of these 
discount, self-service stores in all quar- 
ters of the country. The typical 10 
a.m. to 10 p.m. schedule of these en- 
terprises is regarded as one of the 
major selling points — appealing to 
customers during non-working hours." 

To alert marketing men to the 
swiftly changing consumer picture, 
E. B. Weiss, director of merchan- 
dising at Doyle Dane Bernbach, has 
produced "The New Era of the So- 
phisticated Shopper," a report pub- 
lished by his agency. He reminds 
them that "we are definitely and 
clearly in an era of night hour retail- 
ing. Probably half of the country's 
total retail dollar is spent after 4:30 
p.m.," he concludes, and cites the 
following examples of night volume: 

1. Autos: 50% of total deals 



closed after 4:30 p.m. 

2. Food outlets: minimum of 35% 
of volume done after 4:30 p.m. 

3. Major appliances: 30 to 40% 
of volume after 4:30 p.m. 

4. Shopping centers: 30 to 65% 
of volume at night. 

5. Major city department stores: 
10 to 20% of week's gross at night. 

6. Highway merchants: 60% of 
volume at night. 

7. Chains— Robert Hall, "mill," 




1 



Bernbach, author 
to the new 
night purchasing 



discount types: about 35% at night 

8. Department store branches, 
drug and variety stores: "big" to 
"huge" volume at night. 

The Weiss report's message should 
be clear to media men : Radio has new 
prime time to sell and car radio is 
seeking recognition in the top rank 
of advertising salesmen. Why then 
don't the agencies pay more atten- 
tion? The answer takes us back to 
the original bugaboo, the weakness 
in out-of-home measurement tech- 
niques. 

"The 'last word' selling argument 
is familiar and theoretically it makes 
sense," asserted Bud Sherak, vicei 
president in charge of research at 
Kenyon & Eckhardt. However, radio's 
own vastness is its weakness. It has 
omnibus coverage; everybody tunes 
in. But at any one time it is difficult 
to know whom you are reaching. 

"We cannot explore new territor-| 
ies until out-of-home measurement is 
improved," Sherak stated. "I'm sure 
that in the near future enormous 
strides will be made through mechan- 
ical devices and the fact that we are 
steadily learning more about how to 
measure everything." W 



40 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



^^^^ Issued ever \ 6 mouths 

1ST HALF, VOLUME 14 
JANUARY THROUGH JUNE 1960 



fPONSOR 
NDEX 



tarting at the right is the beginning of sponsor's 
^emi-annual index of stories and features for the 
irst half of 1960. The listing contains 16 major 
ategories and 30 sub-categories and has every 
wtory of interest which appeared in the magazine. 
Where stories should logically appear under two 
Vr more categories, they are indexed accordingly. 
[Tie classifications follow the pattern of past semi- 
annual indexes. Headings are arranged in alpha- 
betical order; stories are listed in chronological 
rder. The headlines used in the index are those 
vhich appeared in the issues in ivhich stories ran. 



ADVERTISERS 

General 

Top i\ spenders, 3rd quarter '59 vs. '58 2 Jan. p. 34 

Pet food industry fights for $V 2 billion bone _ 30 Jan. p. 31 

Industry tags top radio ad experts 30 Jan. p. 38 

Critics of tv advertisers scramble up 5 charges .... 6 Feb. p. 34 
87 national advertisers scramble up 5 charges 

(chart) _ 6 Feb. p. 38 

Look who's buying local tv (box) _. 20 Feb. p. 31 

Will new smoke-pact set a trend? 20 Feb. p. 33 

Should you marry your co-sponsor? 20 Feb. p. 40 

Significant spot radio buys since 1 Jan. (box) 27 Feb. p. 31 

Soaps: most powerful force on Madison Ave 19 Mar. p. 31 

Confusion on wheels: compact cars and air media 26 Mar. p, 31 
Top 100 advertisers in spot tv, 4th quarter '59 

(TvB-Rorabaugh) 26 Mar. p. 40 

Bozell & Jacobs has 60-plus spot radio clients (box) 26 Mar. p. 43 
Who's who in cigarette advertising for the 'Big 6' 

and their agencies _ 16 Apr. p. 38 

Bristol-Myers: drug client with old style headaches 23 Apr. p. 38 

FM advertisers list smacks of name dropping (box) 30 Apr. p. 31 

What tea clients spent on tv in 1959 (box) 7 May p. 40 

Tv/radio sponsors of major league baseball: 1960 14 Aiaj p. 36 

Are tv nets bullying clients? 4 June p. 33 

Air Force tests 'instant airtime' _ 13 June p. 40 

Key active summer radio clients (chart) 20 June p. 31 

Television's new colossus (Amer. Home Prod.) 20 June p. 40 

Sponsor Asks: How can the smaller advertiser 

most effectively use radio? 20 June p. 48 

Detroit's tv revolution — they're selling cars like 

packaged goods . 27 June p. 33 

Personalities 

Newsmaker: Bernard Gould, pres., Boyle-Midway, 

Inc.. I div. of Amer. Home Prod.) 20 Feb. p. 6 

Newsmaker: Herbert L. Barnet, pres. Pepsi-Cola 

Co. _ . _ 12 Mar. p. 6 

Newsmaker: M. C. Patterson, corporate v.p., 

Chrysler Corp. 26 Mar. p. u 

Neivsmaker: Lewis Gruber, bd. chrmn., P. Lorillard 16 Apr. p. 6 

P&G's Bill Ramsey retires (McMillin) 7 May p. 12 

Newsmaker: Charles H. Percy, pres.. Bell & Howell 20 June p. 6 
Newsmaker: Clarence A. Kelso, dir. of advtg., 

Chrysler Internat'l 27 June p. 8 



ADVERTISING AGENCIES 

General 

Why J. Walter Thompson and Esty stay strong in 
radio _ 16 Jan. p. 36 

Cincinnati adman visits a new automated tv station 

(Stockton, West, Burkhart) ....... i • Ian. p. 42 

Seller's Viewpoint: Wade Barnes, Bonded Tv Film 
Service l f > Jan. p. 76 

Who's who in media at the top 10 radio/tv agencies 23 Jan. p. 36 



PONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



Seller's Viewpoint: John C. Cohan, KSBW _... 

Marion Harper's "pure" agency (McMillin) 

Industry- tags top radio ad experts __ 

Setter's Viewpoint: Sterling Zimmerman, KUNO 

Radio 

Ted Bates and time immemorial (McMillin) 

Which agencies have the best media departments 
Sponsor Asks: In what copy areas should agencies 

exen ise caution? _ 

BBDO stuns 'em with a pre-empt tv network 

i (.amble Stores) 



Sponsor Asks: How much should an agency tell a 

rep about a campaign? _ 

Agencies and stations: partners in ad tango 

How soaps are spread through agencies (box) . 

Sponsor Asks: How much merchandising support 

should an agency give a radio/tv campaign? ... 

Seller's Viewpoint: W. Thomas Hamilton, WNDU 



TV 



The media analyst: new Mr. Big . 

Who's who in cigarette advertising for the 'Big 6' 

and their agencies 

Louisville look different to N.Y. media gals 

(WKTTW I 



23 Jan. p. 68 

30 Jan. p. 26 

30 Jan. p. 38 

6 Feb. p. 76 

13 Feb. p. 12 

13 Feb. p. 31 

27 Feb. p. 46 

5 Mar. p. 29 

5 Mar. p. 44 

12 Mar. p. 39 

19 Mar. p. 32 

9 Apr. p. 52 

9 Apr. p. 76 

16 Apr. p. 29 



SPONSOR awards prizes to 20 agency execs _. . 

"What I expect from my agency media people' 

(Richard Paige, Colgate) 

How to pick a hit tv series (Hendrik Booraem, 

OBM) 

Are tv nets bullying clients? — 

Reps: Caught in the dual rate wringer (Ayer) 

Air Force tests 'instant airtime' (MacM, J&A) 

Guild tells AFA tv's triple irritants threaten adver- 
tising profession (Walter Guild, GB&B) 

BBDO on hot weather radio 



30 Apr. p. 38 

30 Apr. p. 45 

7 May p. 41 

28 May p. 44 

4 June p. 33 

13 June p. 35 

13 June p. 40 

13 June p. 46 

20 June p. 32 



Personalities 

Portrait of a crusading marketer (Steve Dietz, 

K&E) 2 Jan. p. 32 

Xewsmaker: Maurice H. Needham, pres., NL&B 9 Jan. p. 6 
Newsmaker.: Matthew J. Culligan, dir., McCann- 

Erickson .... 23 Jan. p. 6 

Xewsmaker : John Peace, pres., Wm. Esty Co. 30 Jan. p. 6 

Newsmaker: Lee Rich, v. p. in chg. of media & 

programing, Benton & Bowles 30 Apr. p. 6 

Newsmaker: Kenneth G. Manuel, pres., D. P. 

Brother 28 May p. 8 

BBDO's Maneloveg looks at media 28 May p. 38 

Newsmaker: Lyle Purcell, exec v.p. & gen. mgr., 

Grant Advtg. _ 4 June p. 8 

Newsmaker: Jack L. Van Volkenburg, supvr., M-E 

Productions (McCann-E.) 13 June p. 8 

Tiniehuving 

Five diaries of timebuyers 9 Jan. p. 32 

Seller's Viewpoint: L. E. Cooney, sis. mgr., KSL 

TV ' . 9 Jan. p. 72 

Sponsor Asks: What makes a timebuyer click?. 23 Jan. p. 56 

How buyers can get better jobs 30 Jan. p. 44 

Timebuyers give stations advice for better research 5 Mar. p. 39 

Timebuyer X and those "73 young men" 12 Mar. p. 40 

Sponsor Asks: Should a representative ever bypass 

a timebuyer? 16 Apr. p. 46 

Timebuving tips from SRA award winners 14 May p. 48 



BROADCASTING INDUSTRY 

General 

FCC vs. FTC. the secret struggle (McMillin) .... 2 Jan. 
Forecast for a fine year (Richard P. Doherty, Tv- 

Radio Management Corp. I 2 Jan. 

Seller's Viewpoint: J. Robt. Covington, Jefferson 

Standard Bdcstg. Co. 2 Jan. 



Sponsor Asks: How can stations develop more na- 
tional business? 

73 young men . . . who are well worth watching ._... 

What we worried about in '50 

Here we go again, boys (re: political conventions) 

Pet food industry fights for %Yi billion bone 

Brand X strikes back: a sponsor spoofer 
Sponsor Asks: Does government know enough about 

broadcasting? . 

25 top names in Chicago radio and tv advertising 

ANA acts on ad criticism 

Seller's Viewpoint: Robert Hyland, KMOX 

Will new smoke pact set a trend? 

An industry grows up (McMillin) 

Got a radio/tv query (sponsor's Readers' Service) 
What the big four told CBS TV affiliates _ 



Coming: the first U.S. trade show for commercials 

Seller's Viewpoint: William L. Jones, KWK 

Sponsor Asks: What makes a good station trade ad? 

Part I . 

The whole truth, and nothing but . . . (Csida) . 

Soaps: most powerful force on Madison Ave. 

Gen. Sarnoff keys RTES' 20th year 

Who's who on motor city's broadcast advertising 



9 Jan. 


P. 


4-1 


16 Jan. 


p. 


33 


16 Jan. 


p. 


38 


23 Jan. 


P- 


31 


30 Jan. 


p. 


34 


30 Jan. 


P- 


3f 


30 Jan. 


P- 


46 


6 Feb. 


P- 


4C 


13 Feb. 


p. 


34 


13 Feb. 


P- 


72 


20 Feb. 


P. 


33 


27 Feb. 


p. 


16 


27 Feb. 


P- 


44 


5 Mar. 


P. 


37 


5 Mar. 


p. 


43 


5 Mar. 


P. 


72 



Sponsor Asks: What makes a good station trade 

ad? Part II 

Rendezvous at the Conrad Hilton (NAB) (Mc- 
Millin i . 

Confusion on wheels: compact cars and air media 
What were they doing in '50? A sponsor quiz __ 

Seller's Viewpoint: Dan Hydrick, WHG Radio 

Convention outlook: far from bright (NAB) 

(Csida) 

An industry in action: part I 

Shakespeare's first stand (McMillin) , 

An industry in action: part II . 



12 Mar. p. 54 

19 Mar. p. 12 

19 Mar. p. 31 

19 Mar. p. 34 

19 Mar. p. 42 

19 Mar. p. 48 

26 Mar. p. 12 

26 Mar. p. 31 

26 Mar. p. 37 

26 Mar. p. 76 



Old friends at the convention (NAB) (Csida) . 
The media analyst: new Mr. Big _ 



Ad council of 50 to judge tv commercials festival 
Seller's Viewpoint: Ted Smith, Adam Young, Inc. 

Sons and lovers in Chicago (NAB) (McMillin) 

Just one president? . . . Does NAB need more? 

Sponsor Asks: How high should discounts go on 

rate cards? ... 

FTC chief to address commercials festival 

Sports: air media"* S200 million gate . 



sponsor proposes new standard billing for radio/tv 

spot 

Who's who along St. Louis' broadcast-advertising 



RTES and Pioneers name veterans 

Sponsor Asks: How will your market stack up in 

1970? part I 

Commercials: ad men pick the years best (Tv 

Festival ) 

BBDO* Maneloveg looks at air media . 



Agencies, reps praise standard billing form 

Sponsor Asks: How will your market stack up in 

1970? part II 

4-A suggests standard rate card 

For love or money? (Csida) 

Seller's Viewpoint: Patrick J. Stanton, WJMJ 

Sponsor Asks: How do you find, develop and pro- 
mote new station talent? 

Huckster preaches in Kentucky (McMillin) 

AFA guide on air copy and the law 

Stations say yes to standard billing form 
Detroit's tv revolution . . . they're selling cars like 
packaged goods 



Sponsor Asks: Co-op advertising . . 
headache? 



blessing or 



2 Apr. 


p. 14 


2 Apr. 


p. 64 


9 Apr. 


p. 12 


9 Apr. 


p. 44 


16 Apr. 


P. 12 


16 Apr. 


p. 29 


16 Apr. 


p. 32 


16 Apr. 


P. 72 


23 Apr. 


p. 12 


23 Apr. 


p. 42 


30 Apr. 


p. 48 


7 May 


p. 38 


14 May 


p. 35 


21 May 


p. 33 


21 May 


p. 42 


21 May 


P . 46 


21 May 


p. 48 


28 May 


p. 33 


28 Mav 


p. 38 


28 May 


p. 42 


28 May 


p. 51 


4 June 


p. 44 


13 June 


p. 14 


13 June 


p. 80 


13 June 


p. 86 


20 June 


p. 14 


20 June 


p. 38 


20 June 


p. 39 


27 June 


p. 33 ! 


27 June 


p. 48 



'2 



Radio Tv Case Histories 

\ir media sends 'em to Salvage (Downtown Sal- 
vage Furniture Co.) 4 June p. 38 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



COSTS AND SPENDING 

Why tv spending is up in the top ten circle 2 Jan. p. 34 

1959 nine-month spending in net tv by pet food 

sponsors 30 Jan. p. 34 

Estimated expenditures of top 15 advertisers, Nov. 

1960 (LNA-BAR; TvB) 13 Feb. p. 65 

Final roundup of how tv nets fared in 1959 (gross 

time sales) 20 Feb. p. 35 

How do radio jingle costs compare in 1960 27 Feb. p. 38 

Estimated expenditures: 15 leading advertisers on 

net tv; 4th quarter, 1959 12 Mar. p. 84 

Top 100 advertisers in spot tv, 4th quarter, 1959 

(Rorabaugh-TvB) 26 Mar. p. 40 

Tea spending on video is up 7.2% 7 May p. 40 

Tv spot expenditures, 1st quarter 1960 (TvB) 13 June p. 42 



Kid books sell 'em just like food _ 

Dig that upside-down beat (Savitt, Jeweler) 
Sponsor Asks: What are the new developmei 

station merchandising services? 

How AFL-CIO budgets for p.r. . 



6 Feb. p. 43 
20 Feb. p. 36 



26 Mar. p. 52 
2 Apr. p. 38 



Sponsor Asks: How do you promote a "good music" 

station? 2 Apr. p. 52 

T know she won't bite, but does she know it?' 

(WRCA) 23 Apr. p. 40 

Ghost audience stuffs ballot box (WZIP) _ 23 Apr. p. 47 

$70 in merchandising reaches 100,000 homes 

(Armour & Co., WAST TV) _ 23 Apr p. 49 

Sponsor Asks: What has been your most successful 

sales-producing plan? 23 Apr. p. 52 

Midwest hoopla moves color sets; part I 4 June p. 37 

Radio's two-way punch for Monroe (Auto Equip.) 13 June p. 43 



COMMERCIALS 



PRODUCT CASE HISTORIES 



Sponsor Asks: Do production refinements in com- 
mercials get across to viewers? 

The pipes of Ban (McMillin) 

Tips for better dog food commercials _ 



' Smart radio . . . Detroit style (Kensinger Jones) .... 
I Things to know in buying jingles — 

Here are the leading musical commercial producers 
i Volkswagen's fast new tv commercial gimmick 

Highlights of new CBS TV commercials rules 

JNow, a library of 12,000 tv commercials (U.S. Tele- 
; service Corp.) 

Tv copy testing: fact or hope? 

iRe: videotape vs. film commercials 

Sponsor Asks: How can agencies keep film costs on 

j tv commercials down? 

jFive commercials tie in Blair radio awards 

^Commercials: ad men pick the year's hest (Tv 

j Festival) 

J50 judges . . . 1,327 commercials 

jiShooting commercials the hard way (Ellington & 

I Co.) 

.^Amateurs top pros in Tech's (Beer) talent search 

[^Seller's Viewpoint: M. M. Steffee, Burke, Dowling, 

Adams, Inc. 



2 Jan. 
16 Jan. 
30 Jan. 
13 Feb. 
27 Feb. p. 36 
27 Feb. 
27 Feb. 
19 Mai 



p. 36 

p. 39 



Appliances 

Folksy, deep, gravel-toned (The Vesto Co.) 

Tv scores in campaign for Westinghouse's new- 
type bulb 21 May 

Automotives 



26 Mar. p. 34 

9 Apr. p. 36 

14 May p. 44 

14 May p. 70 

21 May p. 47 

28 May p. 33 

4 June p. 12 

20 June p. 34 

20 June p. 42 



9 Jan. p. 42 



Renault snow romp ups sales 20% 23 Apr. p. 45 

Rayco upgrades image via spot tv 28 May p. 46 

Radio's two-way punch for Monroe (Auto Equip.) 13 June p. 43 



Beer, Ale, Wine 

Koehler (beer) scores with two-second t 
Talking-mug plugs hike beer sales (Utic 

Clothing & Accesories 



Farm radio gives boost to boots (U.S. Rubber) _ 
Puritan's (menswear mfr.) tv drive wins dealei 



spot9 ...... 9 Jan. p. 35 

Club) .... 26 Jan. p. 44 



FM keeps Hamilton ticking: part I 

Swiss watch's merchandising coup: part II . 



16 Apr. p. 34 
7 May p. 43 
14 May p. 42 



FILM & TAPE 

Sponsor Asks: What's ahead for syndicated film 

j programing in 1960? 

<The truth behind the post-48's 

Re: videotape vs. film commercials . 



it can you get out of a grass roots trip _ 

books sell 'em just like food (Lollipop Kids) 

r's spoof sells seriously 

' Durkee pre-tested its net tv 



p. 44 



What's new in animated production this fall .. 

Telepulse Ratings: top spot film shows 

Telepulse Ratings: top spot film shows 

Telepulse Ratings: top spot film shows 

Telepulse Ratings: top spot film shows 



MARKETING 



sets new Busch distribution (Anheuser- 



20 Feb. 
30 Apr. 

14 May p. 44 

27 June p. 43 

27 Feb. p. 48 

2 Apr. p. 50 

7 May p. 56 

4 June p. 60 



Drugs. Co g mpti'es. Toiletries 

Man-Tan zooms to $1,800,000 tv budget 

Newsmen's soft pitch hikes Super Blue sales (Gil- 
lette) 

Financial & Insurance 

Radio: a broker's blue-chip medium (A. C. Allyn) 28 May p. 40 



t Viewpoint: Paul J. Miller, WWVA 

: $1% billion ad headache 

; Viewpoint: Jack Roth, KONO _ 2 Apr. p. 122 



2 Jan. 

6 Feb. 

6 Feb. 
27 Feb. 
27 Feb. 
12 Mar. 

2 Apr. 



MERCHANDISING, PROM., PUBLICITY 



in Canton as judge picks odd wir 



5 Mar. p. 40 
13 June p. 44 



Foods & Beverages 

lOO^r in radio spot gives boost to Dorann (Foods) 

How Page & Shaw tv test paid off (candy) 

16% increase in apple turnover (Western N. Y. 

Apple Growers Assn.) 

World's top supermarket salesman (Eavey's Super- 



mkt.) 



23 Jan. p. 40 



Chesty (Foods) sports pile up chips 

Toledo tv sparks big turnover (Pepperidge Farm) 
Should you marry your co-sponsor? (Weimar Pack- 
ing Co., Nickles Baking Co.) 
Selling bread in a lunchbox town? (Taste Master) 
Noodles hot in tv spot (Pa. Dutch Egg Noodles) .... 
Radio puts herring on U.S. tables (Vita Food 

Products) .... 

Cereal maker goes 100% to spot radio (Cream of 

Wheat) 

How local tea holds off giants (White Rose) 

The fabulous spot tv story of Pick-a-Pop (Fran will 

Inc.) .. 

$32,500 test moves Plymouth Rock (gelatin) 



2 Jan. p. 35 
16 Jan. p. 41 



23 Jan. p. 41 

30 Jan. p. 42 

13 Feb. p. 37 

20 Feb. p. 40 
5 Mar. p. 36 

12 Mar. p. 38 

19 Mar. p. 45 

26 Mar. p. 38 

16 Apr. p. 41 

30 Apr. p. 40 

21 May p. 39 



NSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



Housing & Property 

Who said radio can'l sell a 1450,000 item (Behrens 
Realty 

il estate ads on b 



6 Feb. p. 45 

2 Apr. p. 42 
Spot radio will help build a <it> here (Centex 

( onstruction Co.) 9 Apr. p. 42 

Retailerg 

Radio ... a Wanamaki'i -ale-maker (John Wana- 

maker) 13 Feb. p. 42 

Eiigbee'a (Dept. Store) night radio jackpot _ 23 Feb. p. 48 



Transportation. Movers 

Spot radio catapults airline sales 
lines i 



National Air- 



Why they moved to net tv (No. Amer. Van Lines) 
.\t u Btara in the N. Y. moving sky (Dane & 

Murphy i _ 

Spot radio spreads Eagle's wings I Eagle Airways) 

Miscellaneous 



6 Feb. 
13 Feb. 



12 Mar. 
30 Apr. 



Radio markets 400,000 books (Profit Research) 30 Jan. 

Grass-roots net radio strategv of a threadmaker 

(Coats & Clark) __ 27 Feb. 

Tv whiz: kids' hobby kits (ITC Model Craft) _ 19 Mi 

Firth* i Carpet Co. ) local level tv partnership 9 Apr. 

Resort strikes local gold with year round tv (High 

Point Inn I 14 May 

Air media sends 'em to Salvage (Downtown Sal- 
vage Furniture Co.) _ 4 June 

Pencils get big push from spot radio plunge (Eagle) 4 June 

Sounds of 'Life' audible on radio (Life Magazine) 20 June ] 

Spot radio a la Francais (French Govt.) 27 June ; 

Why steel backs live tv drama (U. S. Steel) 27 June j 



Two views of radio's sales need- 
New out-of-home radio data spark new buyei ques- 
tion- 
Night radio rolls up more sales -urpri-.- iWPTR) 
Radio gets boost from sales YIP - 
If >ou think you've got it tough, read this (Roy 

Palmer. KPDNi 
Seller's Viewpoint: Morris Kellner. K.i 

Not so gloomy on the grass roots side (Csida) 

Why FM is picking up speed 

Seller's Viewpoint: Harry Novik. WLIB 'Negro 

Market) 

Behind radio's 'good music' boom 

Sponsor Asks: How can radio put its best foot for- 
ward? .... 

Seller's Viewpoint: Robt. E. Eastman, Eastman 

Reps 

There's a run on night radio in Cedar Rapids 

I WMT I 

AIMS radio station men convene in Mexico City 

Seller's Viewpoint: L. R. Rawlins, KDKA 

Sponsor Asks: How did you create your station 

sound? 

Summer radio: a boom at the local level 

Sponsor Asks: How can the smaller advertiser most 

effectively use radio? 

Profile of an image builder (WPAT, Dick Wright) 
Rival stations rally to pitch S. F. market 
•. p. 39 Seller's Viewpoint: Fin Hollinger. K-POI (Hono- 
lulu) , 



PROGRAMING 

Adman, know thy show (Csida) 

Bandstandland revisited (Csida) 

Local tv wins powerful friends (Jersey Stand. Oil) 

What'* ahead on net tv? . 

Forecast of next fall's net tv show schedule for 

prime tinv- 

There- new focus on tv violence _ 

Network tv: bets are now placed 

They're locking up schedules on prime tv time 

Sport-: air media's $200 million gate . 



Seller's Viewpoint: Van Beuren W. DeVries, WGR 

Wl-I \1 T\ 
Animation scores a breakthrough 



9 Jan. p. 14 

23 Jan. p. 20 

20 Feb. p. 29 
12 Mar. p. 35 

12 Mar. p. 35 

30 Apr. p. 35 

7 May p. 33 

7 May p. 34 

14 May p. 35 

21 May p. 72 
27 June p. 43 



RADIO 

General 

Biggei news in radio than payola (Csida) 2 Jan. p. 36 

The case of the purloined puppet (WBT) 9 Jan. p. 36 

Is confusion about areas fouling up radio buying? 9 Jan. p. 40 

Night radio -how- comeback signe _ 23 Jan. p. 34 

Industry tag- top radio ad expert- 30 Jan. p. 38 
Sponsor Asks: What factors did you consider in 

•witching from Top 40 Record List? . 6 Feb. p. 48 

Smart radio . . . Detroit style < Kensinger Jones) 13 Feb. p. 38 

Radio . . . the plight thickens (Csida) _ 20 Feb. p. 13 

Dig that up>ide-down beat (Savitl Jeweler) 20 Feb. p. 36 

Spot radio: it look- -olid in '60 27 Feb. p. 31 

Kadi., turn- the tables (WSA1 newspaper criticism) 27 Feb. p. 40 
Seller's Viewpoint: Carl L. Schuele, Broadcast 

Tim- - 27 Feb. p. 70 

The hectic da\ of a station manager 5 Mar. p. 34 

Radio: new king of the newsbeat 12 Mar. p. 42 



26 Mar. p. 41 



16 Apr. p. 36 

23 Apr. p. 80 

30 Apr. p. 12 

30 Apr. p. 63 

30 Apr. p. 63 

7 May p. id 

7 May p. 52 

7 May p. 84 



4 June p. 52 

20 June p. 31 

20 June p. 48 

20 June p. 48 

27 June p. 45 

27 June p. 78 



Y. moving sky (Dane & 



Radio Case Histories 

100% in radio spot gives boost to Dorann ( Foods) 

Folksy, deep, gravel-toned (The Vesto Co.) 

16% increase in apple turnover (Western N. Y. 

Apple Growers Assn.) 

Farm radio gives boost to boots (U. S. Rubber) .... 
Radio markets 400,000 books ( Profit Research ) __ 
Who said radio can't sell a $450,000 item I Behrens 

Realty Co.) 

Spot radio catapults airline sales (Natl. Airlines) 
Radio ... a Wanamaker salesmaker (John Wana- 

maker Dept. Store) 

Grass-roots net radio strategy of a threadmaker 

(Coats & Clark) 

Selling bread in a lunchbox town? (Taste Master 

Bread) 

New stars in the N. 

Murphy) 

Cereal maker goes 100% to spot radio (Cream of 

Wheat) 

How AFL-CIO budgets for p.r. 

Some nighttime radio clients and results I chart I . 
Spot radio will help build a city here (Centex 

Construction Co.) 

How local tea holds off giants (White Rose) 

Higbee's (Dept. Store) night radio jackpot 

Spot radio spreads Eagle's wings (Eagle Airways) 

FM keeps Hamilton ticking (watches) : part I 

Swiss watch's merchandising coup: part II 

$32,500 test moves Plymouth Rock (gelatin) 

Radio: a broker's blue-chip medium (A. C. Allyn) 
Pencils get big push from spot radio plunge (Eagle) 
Radio's two-way punch for Monroe (Auto Equip.) 
Sounds of 'Life' audible on radio [Life Magazine) 
Spot radio a la Francais (French Govt. I 

Radio Networks 

How nets have added to radio news stature 

Radio Basies 



6 Feb. 


p. 45 


6 Feb. 


p. 46 


13 Feb. 


p. 42 


27 Feb. 


p. 44 


5 Mar. 


p. 36 


12 Mar. 


p. 46 


26 Mar. 


p. 38 


2 Apr. 


p. 38 


2 Apr. 


p. 4" 


9 Apr. 


p. 42 


16 Apr. 


p. 41 


23 Apr. 


p. 48 


30 Apr. 


p. 44 


7 May 


p. 43 


14 May 


p. 42 


21 May 


p. 39 


28 May 


p. 40 


4 June 


p. 40 


13 June 


p. 43 


20 June 


p. -1 


27 June 


p. 42 


12 Mar. 


P . 4. 



How spot announcement rates have changed, '59 vs. 



2 Jan. p. 50 
30 Jan. p. 58 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 196C 



Radio set production sales by month, 1959 27 Feb. p. 50 

In-home listening during winter hours 26 Mar. p. 62 

How out-of-home listening differs by stations 23 Apr. p. 56 

In-home and auto-plus listening, millions of homes 

per minute _._ - — 21 May p. 53 

Number of network vs. independent radio stations, 

B47-1959 - - 20 June p. 54 



Radio Results 

Hobby shops, wonv 



n's apparel, new homes, mat- 



Home products, discount centers, farm machinery, 
bakei 



Toys, clothing, office equipment, restaurant 

Foreign cars, food markets, work clothes, music 
stores - - 

Sewing machines, sports equipment, insurance com- 
panies, tire chains 

Home appliances, food products, cleaners, mobile 
homes 

Food, farm products, tires, automobiles 



Spot Radio 

Spot radio: it looks solid in '60 

sponsor proposes new standard billing for radio/tv 

spot — 

Agencies, reps praise standard billing form .. — 



6 Feb. p. 60 
5 Mar. p. 50 



2 Apr. p. 56 
30 Apr. p. 52 



28 May p. 52 
27 June p. 52 



27 Feb. p. 31 



21 May p. 33 
28 May p. 42 



RATINGS 

,1s numbers research on the run? 9 Jan. 

1 Sponsor Asks: What do you think of the sampling 

I technique of rating services? 16 Jan. 

i Brewing: the battle of the ratings 20 Feb. 

Rating service subscriber pattern in top 20 agen- 

I cies ... 20 Feb. 

^Seller's Viewpoint: Fred M. Thrower, WPIX, 19 Mar. 

I Ghost audience stuffs ballot box (WZIP) 23 Apr. 

Ad agencies mull over ARB coverage study 14 May 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Newsmaker: John J. Wrath, pres., Headley-Reed .... 
What can you get out of a grass-roots trip? (Mc- 

Gavren) 

Sponsor Asks: What are your tips on selecting a 

station representative? 

Blair's spoof sells seriously 

Sponsor Asks: How much should an agency tell a 

rep about a campaign' 



*, Sponsor Asks: Should a representative ever bypass 

a timebuyer? 

I How Blair-Tv cuts paperwork 75% .. 



6 Feb. p. 6 

13 Feb. p. 50 
27 Feb. p. 34 

5 Mar. p. 44 

16 Apr. p. 46 
4 June p. 43 



Reps: caught in the dual rates wringer 13 June 

Rep turns tables, takes on local sales for day 27 June 



RESEARCH AND SURVEYS 

Is numbers research on the run? 9 

Is confusion about areas fouling up radio buying? 
Adam Young) . 



75% of station research goes into agency waste- 
baskets (sponsor) 

New out-of-home radio data spark new r buyer ques- 



|New data from TPI, Sindlinger 16 

I Ad agencies mull over ARB coverage study 14 

Are two-minute spots in the cards for video (P&G) . 14 

New daytime tv facts for buyers (TvB) 21 

Color tv's edge in commercials: part II 4 

Seller's Viewpoint: Dorothy L. Allen, NTA 4 



Jan. 


p. 29 


Jan. 


p. 40 


Mar. 


p. 38 


\pr. 


p. 40 


\pr. 


p. 42 


May 


p. 39 


Ma\ 


p. 46 


Maj 


p. 40 


June 


p. 38 


June 


p. 80 



Nielsen's 1960 tv set count __ 13 June p. 38 

ARB's new set count shows 'reversals' from Nielsen 20 June p. 36 
Will NCS spur new radio trends 27 June p. 37 



SPECIAL ISSUES, SECTIONS 



1959 Annual Tv Results 



2 Jan. 



. 37 



sponsor's NAB Convention issue - 
Harold E. Fellows _ 



sponsor's Semi-Annual Index: July-Dec. 1959 23 Jan. p. 43 

_ 2 Apr. p. 61 

— 2 Apr. p. 62 

2 Apr. p. 64 

- 2 \|„. p. 68 

- 2 Apr. p. 70 

2 Apr. p. 83 



An industry in action . 
Major Convention suites 
Who's who in film at NAI 
Equipment exhibitors 



TELEVISION 

General 

How tv *ets new Busch distribution (Anheuser- 2 Jan. p. 30 

Busch) 

They don't run away from tv _ 9 Jan. p. 39 

Cincinnati adman visits a new automated tv station 

(WKRC TV) 16 Jan. p. 42 

Tv criticism: how much of it makes sense? part I 30 Jan. p. 31 

Tv presentation spurs big artichoke airlift 30 Jan. p. 43 

Mud-stained but economically sound (Csida) 6 Feb. p. 12 

Critics blast tv's advertisers: part II 6 Feb. p. 33 

Local tv wins powerful friends (Jersey Stand. Oil) 20 Feb. p. 29 
It ain't worth a shrug if it ain't got that plug: 

sponsor spoofer 20 Feb. p. 38 

Seller's Viewpoint,: Halsey V. Barrett, Katz Agency 20 Feb. p. 74 

Tv's need: more Standard Oil of N. J. (Csida) 5 Mar. p. 9 

BBDO stuns "em with a pre-empt tv network 

(Gamble Stores) ...._ _. . 5 Mar. p. 29 

New summer rate cards for spot tv 5 Mar. p. 32 

What the big 4 told CBS Tv affiliates 5 Mar. p. 37 

Tv's cowardly critics (McMillin) 12 Mar. p. 14 

Winter's worst storms can't snow out tv (WREK 

TV) 12 Mar. p. 14 

Inside story: your spot at a tv station (KMOX TV) 19 Mar. p. 36 
Now a library of 12,000 tv commercials (U.S. Tele- 
service Corp.* 26 Mar. p. 34 

Tv program control . . . where is it headed? 2 Apr. p. 35 

The 3 -tat ion market mystery (tv allocations) 9 Apr. p. 33 

Tv copy testing: fact or hope? 9 Apr. p. 36 

Ad council of 50 to judge tv commercials festival 16 Apr. p. 32 

New tv data from TPI. Sindlinger 16 Apr. p. 42 

Are spot carriers fair to spot tv? 23 Apr. p. 35 

There's new focus on tv violence 30 Apr. p. 35 

Tea spending on video is up 7.2% 7 May p. 40 

Pay tv calls for very blue chips (Csida) 14 May p. 14 

Are two-minute spots in the cards for video (P&G) 14 May p. 46 

Seller's Viewpoint: Eugene B. Dodson, WKY TV .... 14 May p. 84 

The hoo-haa about Margaret (McMillin) 21 May p. 14 

New daytime tv facts for buyers (TvB) 21 May p. 40 

Tv had it all over print on the summit story (Csida) 28 May p. 14 
How to pick a hit tv series < Hendrik Booraem. 

OBM) 28 May p. 44 

Midwest hoopla moves color sets: part I 4 June p. 37 

Color tv's edge in commercials: part II 4 June p. 38 

Nielsen's 1960 tv set count 13 June p. 38 

Guild tells AFA tv's triple irritants threaten adver- 
tising profession (Walter Guild, GB&B) 13 June p. 46 

ARB's new set count shows 'reversals' from Nielsen 20 June p. 36 

Tv sports: pre-conditioner of live events (Csida) .... 27 June p. 14 

Will NCS spur new radio trends 27 June p. 37 

Tv Case Histories 

Koehler (beer) scores with two-second spots 9 Jan. p. 35 

How to get a druggist, banker, grocer on tv 9 Jan. p. 43 

How Page &. Shaw tv test paid off (candy) 16 Jan. p. 41 

World's top supermarket salesman (Eavey's Super- 
market) 23 Jan. p. 41 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



I best] i Poods) Bporta pile up chips 

Toledo l\ -park- \i\±i turnover turnover (Pepperidge 

Farm I 
\\ In ilir\ moved to nel t\ (No. Vmer. Van Lines) 
Should you main voui co-sponsor? ( Weimar Pack- 
ing Co., Nickles Baking ('>>. » 
Man Tan zooms to $1,800,000 tv budget 
Noodles hoi in tv spot i I'a. Dutch Egg Noodle?) 
T\ whiz: kids' hobby kits (ITC Model Craft) ..__ 
Talking-mug pi m^~ hike beer sales (Utica Club) 

Pull-page real estate ads on tv 

Firth's i Carpet Co.) local level i\ partnership 

Puritan's (menswear mfr. ) tv drive wins dealers. 

Dad- 
Renault snow romp ups sales 20% 



The fabulous spot tv story of Piek-a-Pop (Franwill, 
be.) _ 

Resort -tiikes local gold with year round tv (High 
Point Inn) 

T\ -rotes in campaign for Westinghouse's new type 
bulb _ __. 

Ra>eo upgrades image via spot tv 

's soft pitch hikes SuperBlue sales (Gil- 



13 Feb. 
13 Feb. 

20 Feb. 

5 Mar. 
12 Mar. 
19 Mar. 
26 Mar. 

2 Apr. 

9 Apr. 

16 Apr. 
23 Apr. 



30 Apr. p. 40 
14 May p. 41 



21 May p. 45 
28 May p. 46 



What cars are buying in net participations ..._ 27 June p. 3ii 

Animation scores a breakthrough 27 June p. 43 



Spot Tv 

New summer rate cards for spot i\ 

SPONSOR proposes new standard billing for radio/ 



30. Will discounts aid summer spot tv? . 



Agencies, reps praise standard billing form . 

Are spot carriers fair to spot tv? 

Ilnu Blair-Tv cuts paperwork 75% 

Spot tv shows a 12Cr gain 



5 Mar. 

21 May 
21 May 
28 May 
23 Apr. 
4 June 
13 June 



Tv Basics /Comparagraph 

They're not axin' 'em like they did (net shows) .... 16 Jan. 
Comparagraph: 16 Jan.-12 Feb. 16 Jan. 



13 June p. 44 
27 June p. 46 



Win Steel backs live tv drama (U. S. Stea 

Tv Networks 

Here we go again, boys (re: political conventions) 23 Jan. p. 31 fy Results 



More agencies, clients buy r 

Comparagraph: 13 Feb.-ll Mar 

Viewing trends at halfway mark 

Comparagraph: 12 Mar.-8 Apr. _ 

New audience data on tv web shows . 

Comparagraph: 9 Apr.-6 May 

How occupation affects viewing 

Comparagraph: 7 May-3 June 

Suddenly it's summer: web's lineup .. 
Comparagraph: 4 June-3 July 



13 Feb. 

13 Feb. p. 44 

12 Mar. p. 47 

12 Mar. p. 4?. 

9 Apr. p. 45 

9 Apr. p. |fj 

7 May p. 45 

7 May p. 46 

4 June p. 45 

4 July p. 46 



t tv: new deals ahead . 



Final roundup of how tv nets fared in '59 

What's ahead on net tv? 

Forecast of next fall's net-tv show schedule for 
prime-time 



stores, florists, 



13 Feb. p. 35 

20 Feb. p. 35 Motion picture theatres, depi 

12 Mar. p. 35 shoe stores 

Bakeries, record companies, movie houses, autos .... 

Frozen food, movie theatres, food, ladies' apparel __ 

Building supplies, bakery products, restaurants, dry 

cleaning 



12 Mar. p. 36 



Highlights of new CBS TV commercials rules 19 Mar. 

Network tv: bets are now placed 7 May 

They're locking up schedules on prime time (chart) 7 May p. 34 Food products, flowers, coffee, games 

Are tv nets bullying clients? 4 June p. 33 Food, cookware, discount stores, dairies 



30 June p. 50 

20 Feb. p. 48 

19 Mar. p. 52 

16 Apr. p. 48 

14 May p. 56 

13 June p. 82 



FEATURETTES 

{Continued from page 35) 

program material and urges them to 
be on the lookout for subsequent fea- 
turettes of the same type. "Part of 
the beauty of the vignettes is that 
while they pull in the desired audi- 
ence, they run for too short a time 
to alienate other listeners," adds Dick 
Kelliher, eastern sales manager for 
Young. 

Programing for the featurettes is 
selected on the basis of the kind of 
product advertised, the approach 
taken by the advertiser in his tran- 
scribed announcements, and individ- 
ual market conditions. Young's crea- 
tive services department is building 
a central file on how it handles vari- 
ous situations for which it develops 
featurettes. This way, as new re- 
quests come in directly or by way of 
branch offices, there is a backlog of 
material to aid in creation of appro- 
priate responses to new queries on 
how to spotlight radio spots. 

At Young they see the featurettes 
as a bolster to public service pro- 
graming, and to the spot radio 
medium in general. On the public 
service side, as the station repre- 

46 



sentative's executive v.p. for radio, 
Steve Machcinski puts it, "The fea- 
turette's short duration makes it a 
natural for public service presenta- 
tions such as news flashes, time, 
weather, etc. This gives advertisers 
an attractive opportunity to tie in 
with public service presentations, thus 
upgrading their image." 

As for the featurettes' boost to spot 
radio, Young officials see them as 
bringing in advertisers anxious to be 
identified with a "program," however 
brief. And radio salesmen at Young 
are finding their reception at agen- 
cies more enthusiastic now that they 
have tapes and production to show in 
addition to ratings and availabilities. 

Additional vignettes are in various 
stages of development at Young. To 
a detergent manufacturer they've sug- 
gested use of a "Household Hints" 
tie-in. They're working on a "Laugh 
Time" feature for a cigarette adver- 
tiser to include a joke or two by a 
popular personality who will intro- 
duce his stint and identify the spon- 
sor. Another vignette on the planning 
boards at Young involves an automo- 
tive products company. The "pro- 
graming" portion is to consist of 
"Safety Hints" for motorists. ^ 



COKE 

(Continued from page 33) 
over accompaniment for the filmed tv 
spots. Its lyrics delve into both the 
refreshment provided by Coke and 
the added advantage of the larger 
bottle for those with a "long thirst.' 

Nearly all of the radio spots are 
fully transcribed because the jingle 
is the single most important ingredi- 
ent of the creative approach. There 
are exceptions, however, where 
shortened version of the jingle is em- 
ployed in order to make room for th< 
personal touch by some of the more I 
dynamic radio personalities. 

New York Coke has great expecta- 
tions on the outcome of its king-size 
bottle campaign. Advertiser and 
agency look back with satisfaction on 
the successful introduction of the 26- 
ounce "family-size" bottle back in 
1956. With spot radio providing the 
main advertising punch, New York 
Coke developed the greatest share 
of 26-ounce business in the Coca-Cola 
family. A similar success with the 
12-ounce bottle holds great promise, 
since that's the most popular soft 
drink bottle size and the bottler has 
been leading in total sales without 
using it. ^ 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY 196d 



NOW...real power for your Baton 



Rouge lineup! ) 




Famous old "28" (UHF) hangs up his suit 
after winning every laurel in his league (in- 
cluding 25 out of 26 national merchandising 
campaigns in which he competed). His re- 
placement is a husky young slugger wearing 
a big red "9" (VHF). This "9" reaches all of 
"28's" loyal fans, PLUS a huge new bonus 
market. Now "9" serves 268,400 homes in 
the Central Gulf Area. 



BATON ROUGE 

CHANNEL » LOUISIANA® a 

goes farther — sells more — in one of 
the nation s fastest-growing markets 

^' v V//£\ |pl pi ^^ — first in TV in Baton Rouge— is a 9-inning hustler, draws all-time-record 
(attendance of loyal fans. And what fans! Annual retail sales ($270,882,000) 77% above the 
j-ouisiana average and 45% above the U. S. average! Food sales ($53,187,000) 61% above 
•he state, 19% above the national! Furniture/appliance/ household sales ($17,851,000) 107% 
jabove Louisiana, 80% above the U. S.! 

Why not have "9" in your lineup right from the start! Call Blair TV Associates for a 
'quick rundown. 





SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1900 



After a decade of tv program development, SPONSOR ASKS: 

What are your nominations 

for revivals of 



Rollo Hunter, '•/'• dir tv radio. Erurin 
Wasey, Ruthrauff 8 Ryan, Inc., V. Y. 

In network television, the past is 
as recent as the show that folded last 
week. \t its most distant, it stretches 
back only a little more than a decade. 
Looking hack through the fabulous 
fifties, we find scores of shows which 
might be refreshing to view tonight. 
Maybe we remember them too vividly 
in their original context — when audi- 
ences were less sophisticated and tech- 
niques were less developed — but the 



^^^^^k 

.£*«*!, 

** 



Ernie Kovacs is 
back, but miss- 
ing are Burns & 
Allen, Martin & 
Lewis. Gleason 



basir ideas behind main could well 
be revived. At least, it's nice to rem- 
inisce. 

To curb the temptation here toward 
pure nostalgia and personal taste, we 
should do a little categorizing. Let's 
start with an early period revered 
throughout the industry, the Chicago 
school. It's possible to enjoy Dave 
Garroway weekday mornings, it's pos- 
sible to catch Jack Haskell occasion- 
al!}, but it's been a long time since 
it was possible to see Garrouay at 
Large. On that show they didn't know 
the word "format." and they had guts. 
[Tie] also had taste. The combina- 
tion resulted in rich, easy entertain- 
ment. We could see more today. It 
was delightful to see two-thirds of 
Kukla. Fran and Ollie back with Gar- 
row a\ this month. Burr Tillstrom's 
magic Mill work-. Fran Allison 
should have been along. 

One category leaps out from the 
missing li-t of shows gone but not 
forgotten. Comedy. Manv of the de- 
parted one- seem worthy of revival. 
Perhaps this means thai good corned) 
i- an important missing \itamin in 
'Mii high-cholesterol, low-talent diet of 
westerns an. I more westerns. For ex- 



ample, it would be great to see — just 
as the) were Walk Cox as Mr. 
Peepers, Burns and Allen. Martin and 
Lewis. Buddy Hackett and Carol Bur- 
nett in Stanley, and such great com- 
edy gangs as supported Jackie Glea- 
son and Sid Caesar. It's encouraging 
that Ernie Kovacs is back. Now mav- 
be somebod\ will make room for the 
genius of Herb Shriner. 

There were so manv more. A few 
giants from other classifications — 
Studio One, Voice of Firestone, and 
Robert Montgomery Presents. 

\^ ith all the lumps tv has taken, 
some justified, this young industry 
has created thousands of hours of pro- 
graming worth seeing again. Above 
all others, personally I'd like to see 
again those fascinating close-ups of 
Frank Costello's hands during the Ke- 
fauver hearings. 

Tom Ds Huff, tv producer & tv account 
supr.. Cunningham & Walsh. Inc.. V. Y. 

I think — that before going into spe- 
cific shows, tv generally lacks regu- 
larly-scheduled informative programs, 
high-calibre dramatics, musical varie- 
ties and experimentation. 

It's depressing to think that a show 



Would like spe- 
cial such as 'The 
Moon and Six- 
pence' regularly 
scheduled 



like Wide W ide World, for example, 
had to be suspended. Besides being 
extremely well-produced, it provided 
an area of palatable education sore- 
ly needed to offset the ubiquit\ of 
westerns and whodunnit-. 

As for most of today's dramatic 
efforts, the bulk of the so-called dra- 
matics being mass-produced in Holly- 
wood (ant compare to a show like 
Producer's Showcase for over-all pro- 
duction qualit) and dramatic ma- 
terial. Playhouse 90, one show that 




does compare and one of the few 
non-specials to receive an Emmy 
award, should return to its former 
weekly schedule. 

It's significant that the majority 
of Emmy awards went to specials. 
Whv couldn't the same effort, talent 
and enthusiasm applied to such one- 
shots as The Moon and Sixpence and 
The Turn of the Screw be applied 
to a regularly-scheduled program? 

The same can be asked about musi- 
cal variety shows. In this area, I'd 
like to see the old Garrouay At Large 
program revived. Nobody expects a 
Bing Crosby or a Fred Astaire to 
wear thin and jeopardize their popu- 
larity by appearing on a regular 
weekly basis. However, there is 
enough top talent around that could 
be obtained on a twice-yearly basis 
and mixed throughout the year for a 
weekly or twice-monthly show. Mul- 
tiple sponsors and multiple produc- 
tion teams for such programs would 
stimulate competition and quality. 

Going as far into television's past 
as 1953. I think an excellent choice 
for revival is Hollywood Screen Test. 
This was a show on which young, 
fledgling talent performed opposite 
seasoned professionals. A program 
similar to Hollywood Screen Test. 
which discovered such stars as Jack 
Lemon. Grace Kelly, and Patricia 
O'Neil, would be a refreshing lift out 
of the ruts in which tv found itself. 

On the whole. I think tele\ ision 
would do well to regain some of its 
early swashbuckling flavor. It's 
not so ancient that it needn't con 
tinue to experiment as legit theater 
still does and always will do. 

Jim Bealle, '■/'••" director. Kenyon & 
Eckhardt. Inc., New York 
To decide which tv shows would be 
welcome if the\ were brought back 
to the air. you must define the pur- 
pose for their return: personal enter- 
tainment, excellence and excitement 
of the medium, or client exposure. 






SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



tv shows? 



Taking first things first, namely cli- 
'ent advantage, it is a major loss that, 
['today, specials seldom achieve actual 
special status. "Event viewing," rep- 
resented by shows like the Ford 
Fiftieth Anniversary Show, Peter 
\Pan, Cinderella, Our Town and 
Annie Get Your Gun, would go a 
llong way toward pumping life into 
this or am other tv screen. 



£ 



Classics were 
'Ford Fiftieth 
Anniversary 
Show,' 
'Peter Pan,' 
'Our Town 



Fulfillment of tv's purpose, on the 
father hand, hits a recurring four- 
■year high this fall with the political 
'campaigning and Election night re- 
turns. But if you are professionally 
''interested in the medium, you wish 
vWide, Wide World and Omnibus 
j'again were competing for the Sunday 
plafternoon audience, or, preferably, 
jiwith tape's present efficiency, you 
[(would like to see these shows provid- 
ing a wonderful free ride for the 
'■viewers' imaginations in prime time. 
I When your kids were kids, Kukla, 
Fran and Ollie, Time for Beanie and 
l : Houdy Doody Time were entries 
Ijthat probably never turned out a 
"juvenile delinquent during their runs, 
h For the public's personal enter- 
tainment: How long has it been since 
J you really laughed at a tv show? 
Ma\ be some of the excitement was 
[engendered by seeing great comedy 
|for free. But wouldn't everyone like 
Ito see Berle forget his lines for the 
fjfirst time, Gleason play five parts, 
(Jerry ruin Dean's song by leading 
tjthe band astray, and Gobel mistake 
'an Italian actress for a beach ball? 
[i Such are some of the shows we 
hcould welcome back. These and 
•'20 others like them could form a nu- 
cleus for a good network ! ^ 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



WSBT-TV 



...SOUTH BEND, INDIANA'S 
DOMINANT STATION 




ERNIE BANKS ON WSBT-TV . . . 
(South Bend Banks on WSBT-TV, Too) 

The booming bat of Ernie Banks was silent. But only long 
enough for the Chicago Cubs' slugging shortstop to be inter- 
viewed by WSBT-TV's Sports Director, Jim Wilson. 

The Banks-Wilson filmed discussion is one of a series of inter- 
views with sports greats that are standard features of WSBT-TV's 
"Wilson on Sports" (Mon.-Fri., 5:45-6:00 P. M.). This is the top 
rated sports show in the 3-station South Bend Market. It con- 
stantly rates over 20; has an adult audience divided equally 
between men and women. 

With highly rated local shows and popular CBS programs, WSBT- 
TV delivers Indiana's richest Metro Area . . . per household 
income is $7553! See your Raymer man for details about the 17 
county WSBT-TV market and for remaining availabilities on 
"Wilson on Sports." 

WSBT-TV® 

South Bend, Indiana • Channel 11 
Ask Paul H. Raymer • National Representative 



Unequal Time 
for the Delegates 
from Corinthian 



When the smoke clears away from the politi- 
cal conventions in Los Angeles and Chicago 
this summer, someone may well point out that 
Corinthian's "delegates" were seen and heard in 
their home areas more than the candidates. 

The reason is simple : They went as electronic 
reporters, complete with cameras and mikes, 
curiosity and zeal. 

In the first major TV-group effort of its kind 
Corinthian is fielding a 14-man team for conven- 
tion coverage. 

Why go to such expense, when national cover- 
age is on tap at the flick of a CBS switch? 
Because we want local and regional coverage to 
complement CBS's superb national coverage. 
Because we want to tell an intensive story of our 
respective state delegations. Because we want 
to view national events with local eyes. 

Each Corinthian station news director, work- 
ing with his own cameraman, saturated with 
knowledge of local political situations, interprets 
events for his specific local audience. Through 
video tape, sound on film and voice over silent 
film, we provide audio-visual coverage; through 
on-the-spot reporting via telephone we fuse TV 
and radio into one electronic medium. And, at 
a time when the conventional pattern of conven- 
tion coverage is to sell station breaks as com- 
mercials, we're integrating them with special 
political reports. 

In a special sense, Corinthian is playing poli- 
tics for all it's worth-the politics of intensive, 
explicit local news coverage. This is not group 
journalism. It is individual station journalism 
through group organization. 

Our five TV and two radio stations thus 
achieve even greater identification with their 
regional audiences— and vice versa. 




Responsibility in Broackas'il 

mmitmwM 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 




KOTV 

Vvlsk(H-R) 
KHOU-TV 

Houston Ccbs-tv Spot Sales) 

[kxtv 

f SACRAMENTO (H-R) 

t WANE-TV 

IrORT Wayne (H-R) 
\ WISH-TV 
Indianapolis (H-R) 

WANE-AM 
I r ORT Wayne (H-R) 
[WISH-AM 

I NDlANAPOLIS (H-R) 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



RADIO BUYS 

Texaco, Inc., New York: Weekend traffic minute schedules begin 
the last week of July for two and three weeks in western markets. 
Buys are for 10-12 spots per week per station. Buyer: Dan Borg. 
Agency: Cunningham & Walsh, New York. 

Parker Bros., Inc., Salem, Mass.: Preparing the Christmas cam- 
paign for its game line, in 50-75 markets. Day minute schedules to 
reach the housewife, who, its research shows, is responsible for 80% 
of its sales, start in November for six weeks. Frequency is 15-20 per 
week per market. Contact is exec v.p. Frank Browning. Agency: 
Badger and Browning & Parcher, Inc., Boston. 

TV BUYS 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., Louisville: Activity con- 
tinues on the new Kentucky Kings all-tobacco filter cigarette, with 
the market list now at about 50. New placements of prime time I.D.'s 
start 1 August for 52 weeks. Buyer: John McCormack. Agency: Ted 
Bates & Co., New York. 

Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati: About 15 markets get Oxydol 
schedules this month. Night minutes are placed through the P&G 
contract year. Buyer: Dick Doherty. Agency: D-F-S, New York. 

Revlon, Inc., New York: Campaign for Hi & Dri begins this month 
in a number of top markets. Day and night minutes are being sched- 
uled for six weeks. Buyer: Betty Nasse. Agency: Grey, New York. 

Ceneral Electric Co., Cleveland: A SI million dollar budget cover- 
ing all media has been set for the fall campaign for its light bulb line. 
In tv, a four-week promotion begins 19 September on 269 stations in 
125 key lamp markets. About 100 spots will be used in each market 
over the period. Animated commercials have an Electiontime humor 
theme featuring Mr. Magoo. BBDO, Cleveland, handles the account; 
Dick McGinnis is the account supervisor. 

Wildroot Co., Inc., Div. of Colgate-Palmolive Co., Buffalo: 
Placing runs of fringe night minutes in scattered markets for Vam 
Hair Formula. Schedules start this month, length depends on mar- 
ket. Buyer: Eileen Greer. Agency: Ted Bates & Co., New York. 

Helene Curtis Industries, Inc., Chicago: Introductory campaign 
for its new hair spray, Gay-Top, starts this month. Schedules of day 
and night minutes are being used in about 10 midwestern markets. 
Agency: Edward H. Weiss & Co., Chicago. 

United States Time Corp., New York: Its back-to-school promo- 
tion for Timex watches starts 22 August for two weeks. Schedules 
of prime time I.D.'s, 10-15 per week per market, will run in 55 mar- 
kets. Buyer : Carol Hardy. Agency : W. B. Doner & Co., New York. 



51 



Capsule case histories of success^ 
local and regional radio campai% 




RADIO RESULTS 



MAGAZINES 

SPONSOR: WcCaWs Magazine AGENCY: Donahue & Coe 

Capsule case history: To boost subscription sales of Me- 
Call's magazine in the Washington. D. C. area. WTOP per- 
sonality Bob Kelly was on the air for three successive Sun- 
days. 8:15 to 12 noon, pitching 16 issues for two dollars. 
Results: 661 new subscriptions. Total cost to McCalVs was 
onlj (378. With this kind of success, it bought a second 
schedule on Kelly's Sunday show for eight weeks, using 12 
announcements per show. This time Kelly's selling brought 
1,305 subscriptions, with phone calls and mail coming not 
only from the Washington. D. C. area, but from as far as 
fai ksonville, Fla.. upstate New York, and parts of West Vir- 
ginia. Even weeks after each schedule, requests for subscrip- 
tions continued. Total direct sales from the two campaigns 
on the Kellv show was 1.966 and McCaU's reported that it 
was <>ne of its most successful promotions from every stand- 
point. The outstanding number of WTOP orders reduced 
the cost-per-subscription for the schedules to only 68 cents. 
WTOP. Washington. D. C. Announcements 

SHOPPING CENTERS 

5P( >NSOR: One Stop Shopping Center AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: A Northwest Kansas retailer won a 
citation from the Kansas Association of Radio Broadcasters 
for the most outstanding single radio campaign. The newly 
won radio account. Williams Brothers" One Stop Shopping 
Center of Atwood, Kansas, retailers in food, wearing apparel, 
and hardware, decided to consolidate their three-store seg- 
ment- under one roof. In an effort to promote the reorgani- 
zation and create store traffic. Williams Brothers purchased 
a heavy schedule on KXXX. Colby. Kan., to run prior to 
their three-day grand opening. As part of the saturation cam- 
paign the store arranged for a special half hour remote pro- 
gram from One Stop featuring the singing team of Doc & 
Esther. "This is the greatest number of people I have ever 
had in m\ store at any one time." said Glenn Williams, man- 
i the shopping group. We did more business during 
the three-day grand opening than in am comparable month 
a year igo. K\\\ was exactly the impact we needed. 
K\\\. Colby Announcements 



MILLINERY 

SPONSOR: The Millinery Mart AGENCY: Din 

Capsule case history: The .Millinery Mart of Scrantc 
Pa., specializing in moderately priced and better ladies" hi 
for over 20 years, and known throughout the entire an 
recently purchased a spot radio campaign on Scrantc r 
WGBI to advertise a special clearance sale of winter ha 
In 1959 The Millinery Mart promoted a similar sale exrl 
sively in local newspapers. This was the first time radio hi 
been used by the millinery shop. Immediately after the cai 
paign got underway, the millinery shop showed substanti 
increases over the 1959 sale. "I credit this increase to rad I 
and especially to WGBI." said Fred Michel, owner and opt 
ator of the shop. "We are more than pleased with the resul 
received." he continued. More importantly. The Milline 
Mart had such remarkable results from the promotion th 
Michel purchased another campaign and is planning co 
tinued use of WGBI for special promotions. "It showed 
that not only does radio reach more people, it sells better 
WGBI. Scranton-Wilkes Barre Announcem 

FINANCE 

SPONSOR: General Finance Co. AGENCY: Di 

Capsule case history: The familiar cry of play ball hi 
a happy ring for the General Finance Co. of South Bend. I 
diana. General co-sponsors the White Sox baseball gain* 
broadcast on WXDL . The tremendous public interest in tl 
White Sox in the Michiana area (Michigan-Indiana) th 
WXDU covers has given the firm a consistent sponsor idenl 
fication and enabled it to build a strong year-round car 
paign over WXDU. Throughout the year. General use- 
series of time signals daily and a five-minute news show si 
times a week. Dick Trinkman. v.p. and general manager 
General, says: "In five years we've grown from one office I 
four in this area largely because of co-sponsorship of tl 
White Sox broadcast and our other WXDU advertising. Tl 
total long-term loans outstanding is more than 10 times mi 
it was before we used WXDU. In 1959 alone we had a 2f 
growth over the previous year and the future prospects ii A 
cate that with WXDU support our growth will contitui 
WND1 . South Benrl 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY I960 



NL r 

WWDC EDITORIALS 

ale 



Resisting revenue rigorously, we devote at least ten choice time spots a 
day to WWDC Editorials. Comments like these are worth more than gold: 



(TV Repair Racket) "I would like to thank you for the extraordinary 
editorials on the television service problems. It is only because of 
dedicated men such as yourself, in the face of great odds against a 
cause, that justice wins out in the end." 

N. R. S., President TV Engineering Firm 

(Mental Health) "... these editorials fully disclose the amount of 
research that you must have done in connection with this most impor- 
tant subject and... point up the problem most vividly and dramatically. 
May I also say that I feel Station WWDC is rendering a real public serv- 
ice in bringing this important matter and the circumstances attendant 
to a proper solution to the listening public." 

L. S. B., Mayor Local Community 

(Education) "Your editorial on vandalism is excellent. It will be for- 
warded to the school officers for their use. Thanks for the help on this 
and other school projects." 

C. F. H., Superintendent of Schools, Washington, D.C. 

(Home Repair) "May I congratulate you for your fine effort toward the 
elimination of abuses in this very important field of our housing 
economy. I feel certain your editorial has done much to alert home 
owners . . . against the abuses we are all endeavoring to stamp out." 
R. F. C, Assistant Commissioner, FHA 



(Mental Health) "I would also like to take this opportunity to con- 
gratulate you and the members of your staff for the splendid contribu- 
tion you are making to the entire metropolitan area community by 
bringing to the public attention the problems currently facing local 
governments in the area of mental health. Keep up the good work!" 
J. R. F., House of Representatives, U.S. Congress 

(Education) ". . . thanks for your fine editorial on our expanded Sum- 
mer Program. . . we feel that your WWDC Editorials are such an excel- 
lent example of public service broadcasting that we are sending a letter 
of commendation to the Federal Communications Commission." 

C. T. W., Superintendent of Schools, Area County 

(G.I. Cold War Bill) "I sincerely appreciate your support of the meas- 
ure and will continue to work for its passage . . . may I commend the 
news staff of your station for its coverage of this and other important 
issues of the day." 

Senator R. Y., U.S. Senate 

(Parking) "... I am indeed grateful that you have taken the time to 
prepare such an excellent presentation of our efforts to provide short- 
time parking facilities for those persons who come to Union Station to 
transact railroad business." 

M. H. L., Manager Terminal Company 




WWDC 

. . . the station that keeps people in mind 

WASHINGTON, D.C— REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



And in growing Jacksonville, Fla. — it's WWDC-owned Radio WMBR 



sponsor • 25 JULY 1960 




THE PIEDMONT INDUSTRIAL CRESCENT 



the 



HOSIERY i 



ndustry 



creates buying power in the Piedmont Industrial Crescent ! 

The South's gigantic hosiery industry, creating unlimited disposable income, 
makes the piedmont market a must buy. And WFMY-TV . . . located in the 

heart of the piedmont ... is the dominant selling influence in this 
$3,000,000,000 market. WFMY-TV serves ... and sells in this heavy 

industrial 54-county area where 2,250,000 people live, work and buy. 



ujfmy - tv 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

•NOW IN OUR 11th YEAR OF SERVICE- 




SPONSOR • 25 july 1960 



Whafs happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



*» WASHINGTON WEEK 



25 JULY I960 

Cmrlikt INI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



Voiding of the Public Service Television license for tv channel 10 in Miami hit 
hard, and at a time when Washington appeared set to go to sleep for the summer. 

The same thing was done with Boston channel 5, hut WHDH, Inc., will be permitted to 
re-apply. Public Service Television has been labeled unacceptable as an FCC licensee. 

However, the two cases were similar in one chilling aspect. In each case, the FCC went 
beyond the recommendations of its specially selected hearing examiner. This was another indi- 
cation that the Commission has the hatchet out in earnest for those it deems violators. 

The sweeping Miami channel 10 decision not only found Public Service disqualified be- 
cause of unethical pressures on commissioners, it also disqualified two losing applicants, North 
Dade Video and WKAT, Inc. This left the sole remaining applicant, L. B. Wilson, Inc., 
to grab the prize by default. However, Wilson was pointedly given only a four-month 
license. 

In the Boston case WHDH, Inc., Herald-Traveler subsidiary, and losing applicant Massa- 
chusetts Bay Telecasters were given demerits for contacting then-chairman George C. Mc- 
Connaughey. Thus handicapped, they will vie again with DuMont and Greater Boston TV for 
the channel. 

Nobody would deny that these actions are quite significant to the station oper- 
ators concerned, and to their rivals. But the significance extends far beyond this. 
The decisions are symptomatic of the new FCC get-tough, crackdown policy. 

Applicants will be required in the future to bend over backwards to avoid any impres- 
sion of favor-seeking or off -t he-record presentations. The FCC, perhaps even more im- 
portantly, will go as far as it thinks it has the legal power to go in ordering stations to operate 
"in the public interest." 



Meanwhile, there is evidence that some in Congress who were outspokenly in 
favor of such an FCC attitude stiffening are now having second thoughts. 

Exhibit A would have to be the tough time the FCC had in getting just half of the money 
it asked to set up a monitoring unit. Along with that half, the Commission got a lecture where 
it counts on avoiding any semblance of censorship. The language was right in the money 
bill. 

Next development aimed at showing a wavering in Congressional ranks will be Senate 
consideration of a House-passed catch-all bill providing, among numerous other things, for 
suspension of station licenses and/or fines for violations of the Communications Act and FCC 
regulations. 

Although these are the only two provisions which disturb the industry, the bill contains 
such other things as criminal penalties for payola, plugola and quiz rigging which makes it 
possible for the FCC to act against station employees and program packagers. On the credit 
side, it reverses the FCC and permits stations to accept records, payment of remote 
expenses, props, etc., without demanding sponsorship identification. 

Prospects are that the Senate Commerce Communications subcommittee under Sen. Pastore 
will decide against giving the FCC power to suspend station licenses for up to 10 
days. The fines of up to $1,000 per day, amended by the House to apply only to "repeated 
and willful" violations, will likely remain in the bill, however. 



• 25 july 1960 



55 






Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



25 JULY I960 

Covyrlfht IMO 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC 



FILM-SCOPE 



You can expect Carling's to drop CBS Films' Phil Silvers and move into anoth< 
comedy — a new one from another syndicator — in quite a few of its 63 markets. 

A Carling exit from CBS Films would be a painful repetition of a pattern of departin 
regional clients at the CBS film arm, following closely on the heels of terminations of massiv 
deals by Conoco, Continental Baking, and Amoco. 

However, CBS Films has made up for this lost ground with business in new areas 
Its first network deal, Angel to CBS TV, and big regional sales to Blue Plate Foods (Brother 
Brannagan) and Lay's Potato Chips (Deputy Dawg). 



Brown & Williamson (Ted Bates) is looking for half hours for expansion o 
its regional buy of Ziv-UA's Case of the Dangerous Robin. 

The B&W objective: Alternate weeks in 100 markets for its new brand Kentucky Kings 
This B&W regional was initially for 32 cities. 



MCA's Shotgun Slade will go into a second year of production and starts o£ 
with the important East Coast Ballantine regional to its credit. 

If Ballantine's four-year affiliation in the past with Highway Patrol is any precedent, tin 
same advertiser's connection with Shotgun Slade, now for a second year, may also be a long one 



You can add Jax Beer (DCS&S) to the list of advertisers who have renewed foi 
a second year of Screen Gems' Manhunt. 

The Jax renewal is for 13 southern markets. 
Jax, which came back into syndication last season after several years absence, appears t«j 
be back to stay, hence the importance of the renewal. 



Tv film programing is taking off in a number of new directions. 

Hence, keep your eye on these program areas: 

• "Documentary:" CNP has hired Allen H. Miner to produce Western dramas base* 
on actual events and shot in factual, newsreel style. 

• Cartoons: Robert Lawrence Animation jumps into the programing field for the fir si 
time with Toy Box Time, a color series of four segment half-hour episodes. 

• Sports : Heritage Productions will use sports and entertainment stars on its new five 
minute series, Golf Tip of the Day. 



The UA influence on Ziv-UA policies is beginning to be felt. 

In a new production deal signed with independent producer John Robinson's Libra Lim- 
ited for a contemporary action series, there is a break with the Ziv tradition of producing 
all shows from within the house. 

Note that the use of independent producers has been a UA specialty and its first use byi 
the combined Ziv-UA force marks a new production philosophy for the Ziv-UA company. 



FILM-SCOPE continued 

Programers are discovering something about animation that the producers 
knew long ago: it's very helpful to start off with a music track. 

At least two animated series this year have started off from hit recordings, to which 
animated visuals are added later. 

UAA's Mell-O-Tunes, for example, uses famous children's records for character inspira- 
tion, and Flamingo is deriving its Nutty Squirrels Tales from a recently successful novelty 
recording. 

Incidentally, Nutty Squirrels Tales, produced by Transfilm-Caravel (a sister subsidiary to 
Flamingo in the Buckeye family) has gotten off the ground with 15 station sales. 

These include WGN-TV, Chicago; WTVN-TV, Columbus; WKBN-TV, Youngstown; 
KHSL-TV, Chico; KVOS-TV, Bellingham; WNEP-TV, Scranton, and KYTV-TV, Springfield. 

There are 150 Nutty Squirrel Tales of six minutes length. 



There are already 1,985 post-1948 films released for tv, according to BIB 
figures, and still none of the long-heralded commotion has taken place. 

These post-1948's comprise almost one-fifth of feature films now ready for tv. For the 
record, there are now 9,200 feature films in current release by 45 distributors, as re- 
ported in the latest Tv Feature Film Source Book. 



David Wolper and Sterling Television have formed a new company, Wolper- 
Sterling Productions, which will produce 12 hour long specials and a half -hour 
series. 

City National Bank of Beverly Hills and Irving Trust of New York financed the new 
production company. 

Wolper's Race For Space show was denied network booking and was shown as a national 
spot special recently. 

Sterling, which also distributes AMF's bowling show, Hearst Metrotone News, and Time, 
Inc. tv properties, sold its Silents Please to ABC TV last week and Fremantle International has 
also negotiated its sale to the Australian Broadcasting Commission for simultaneous premiere. 

David Stone, film buyer in New York for the Australian network, noted that in certain 
cases programs are being bought for Australia even before their U. S. air dates. 



Ampex's largest sale to date to an individual station was its $900,000 share re- 
cently of $2 million worth of broadcast equipment for WFAA-TV and radio in 
Dallas. 

The southwest station ordered three Ampex Videotape recorders, six Marconi cameras, and 
a $250,000 mobile tape recording cruiser. 

The backbone of WFAA-TV's tape operation is its massive coverage of regional foot- 
ball for Humble Oil. 

A mobile unit covers Southwest games and then edits the tape for broadcast requirements 
while on the road en route back to the station. 



RCA has shipped 118 tv tape recorders so far, of which 65 went to domestic 
broadcasters or producers. 

Next to NBC, which ordered 12, RCA's best customer has been Reeves Sound Studio, 
which took eight. (For a list of RCA tape installations, see FILM WRAP-UP, p. 64.) 

• 25 july 1960 57 




25 JULY I960 

Copyright I960 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admei 



SPONSOR HEARS 



It still looks as though there'll be no decision on the NAB presidency until aftei 
the national elections and somebody outside the industry will get the job. 

The prevailing view: it would be smart politics to wait until then and see what figures in thi 
limelight are available, although the choosing committee had already six prospects undei 
consideration — all non-industry. 



Around Radio City last week they were referring to Bob Kintner as the crew-cuj 
version of Joe Culligan. 

Kintner was wearing a black patch over his left eye as the result of an operation. 



One cause for suspicion that the Pabst account's leaving JWT Chicago: 

The agency has been unable to get a client decision on various options it has taken on t\ 
network sports series. 



Radio stations that have linked themselves to regional networks are getting 
some angry buzzing from their regular reps. 

It seems that some of the regionals are selling their groups in segments instead of the 
whole smear and at special rates. 

Argue the reps : how do you expect us to get the full card rate for your station if 
they can buy it at reduced rate from a regional network? 

The reps, naturally, are also miffed by the fact that this broken-field type of selling by 
the regional does them out of commissions. 



Often you judge how some one is moving along in a big organization by the fre- > 
quency his name is mentioned within company walls and on the outside. 

At the moment in CBS TV there's one such newly suggested star on the ascendancy : he 
Spencer Harrison, who started his CBS career in the legal department. 



Speaking of training-grounds, you have to give the No. 1 spot to Y&R's pro 
gram department when you compile an executive roster of the business. 

Such Y&R alumni include: Pat Weaver (McCann-Erickson International) ; Dan Sey- 
mour (JWT) ; Don Stauffer (SSCB) ; Rod Erickson (now operating his own enterprises) ; 
Hank Booraem (Ogilvy, B&M) ; Ev Meade (OB&M) ; Tom Lewis (LaRoche) ; Hubbell 
Robinson (freelance producer) ; Harry Akerman (freelance producer) . 



In reaching out for new business the agency with a petro-chemical account I 
carries a particularly big handicap. 

By virtue of the fact that the petro-chemicals keep expanding their product areas an I 
agency can be barred from going after as many as 10 different categories of I 
accounts. 

In other words, presiding over a giant petro-chemical's ad budget has both its shining as- I 
*<-ts and its frustrating liabilities. 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY I960 1 



On The Gulf Coast 



IDE BIG ONE 



ARE 



Takes the Measure 



tt 



PULSE 



NIELSEN 



TRENDEX 



CHANNEL 5 
MOBILE, ALA. 



L 



J 



wkrgtv 

CHANNEL 5 MOBILE, ALA. 

Call Avery-Knodel, Representative, 
or C. P. Persons, Jr., General Manager 



■PONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 






NEWS & IDEA 



^ WRAP-UP 



THIS IS THE LIFE? Maybe for Jean Morris, but for Bob Jones, 'on camera' might be more 
comfortable. The two WFLA-TV, Tampa, station personalities appeared with others at local 
skating rinks in behalf of Florida West Coast Babe Zaharias All Sports Week Cancer Drive 




24-DAY WALK-A-THON staged by WINS, N.Y., to raise money for the National Multiple 
Sclerosis Society, finds d.j. Murray Kaufman setting out with models (l-r) Lynne Galvin, Naomi 
Brosset, Lori Redding. Walk will cover N.Y.C., Sullivan and Nassau Counties, parts of N. J. 




ADVERTISERS 



The day has ended when a soan 
or bleach manufacturer can e 
clusively tie in with automatic 
washer makers to include a san* 
pie in the machine. 

P&G has settled a complaint on thi^ 
score 1p\ the FTC to desist not onU 
from such exclusive agreements bui 
paying washer salesmen 75c or If 
for pushing P&G's products. 

Westinghouse Electric will utili/t 
part of its S6 million convention 
and election package to promote 
two public service tv series. 

The programs, produced h\ We-t 
inghouse Broadcasting, are Reading 
Out Loud and Lab 30. Each will gei 
two 90 second institutional promo) 
tions during prime evening timei 
Scene clips and mention that tha 
series are available free of charge ai 
facets of the announcements. 

Campaigns: 

• Remington Rand Portable: 
Typewriters (Compton) and RCA 



MYSTERY MAN REVEALED! He's 
Carney, star of NBC TV's 'Masquerad 
Mr. X contest. Here exec produce 
Wolf (I), sponsor Block Drug's ad 
Fred Plant pose with prize Triumph sp 




SPONSOR • 25 JULY 



r ictor (Grey) records have joined 
1 a nationwide promotion "Be A Hit 
X School." Consumers are offered 
free 45 rpm record made exclusively 
Dr the promotion and featuring teen 
ge idols. All they must do to obtain 
le disc is to go to their Remington 
ealer and try out one of the new 
ortables. A contest, entry blanks 
fading "I am typing this on a Rem- 
igton Portable" is part two of the 
romotion — in 25 words or less "I 
njo\ listening to your records be- 
ause . . ." Companies will use print 
'rid NBC TV's Bonanza to advertise 
•he promotion. 

• H. J. Heinz Company will of- 
;r students an inflatable full-color 
oriel globe in return for cash and 
ibels from its condensed tomato 
oup. The promotion which will put 
„he "whole world" in children's 

ids. will be advertised extensively 
/ith emphasis on point-of-sale ma- 
erials. The offer will be highlighted 
n eight Heinz-sponsored daytime tv 
rograms coast-to-coast, during Au- 
ust and September. Agency : Maxon. 

• The Clark County (Nevada) 



Fair and Recreation Board has 

planned an advertising campaign for 
its new public service to appear in 
the Los Angeles area. The service 
will make free reservations for motel 
rooms in Las Vegas. Radio, tv and 
other media will be used under the 
$100,000 budget. Agency: The Mel- 
vin Company. 

• The Barcolene Company is 
making heavy use of tv to introduce 
its new product Jet Starch. It is pres- 
ently beingly distributed in major 
markets on the Eastern seaboard and 
middle Atlantic states. Agency: 
Silton Brothers. Callaway. Inc. 

Thisa 'n' data: Timex, in com- 
menting on the future of its industry's 
business said, "television watching 
has made people watch-watchers and 
wearers. Children, who in previous 
years drove parents frantic by their 
disregard for time, are now becoming 
punctual, even though the reason is to 
'get home in time' to view their video 
favorites" . . . Charles E. Hires Co. 
will put its canned beverage into na- 
tional distribution . . . 



Kudos: Dempsey-Tegeler & Co. 

was awarded a Citation of Excellence 
for its radio advertising from the 
First Advertising Agency Group, Dal- 
las .. . Atlantic Refining Co. and 
its agency N. W. Ayer, were honored 
by the Phillies, Red Sox, Pirates and 
Yankees for 25 consecutive years of 
baseball advertising. 

Acquisition: U. S. Tobacco Co. 
has purchased Lummis & Co. of 

Philadelphia, manufacturers of 
canned nuts and packaged nut prod- 
ucts. 

Strictly personnel: William K. 
Eastham, named executive vice pres- 
ident, Boyle Midway division of 
American Home Products . . . David 
Gutterson, to general manager and 
advertising director, L P Labora- 
tories . . . John D. Tobin, named 
advertising and sales promotion man- 
ager, Seven-Up Bottling Co., Chicago 
. . . Douglas K. Burch, appointed 
media director, P. Lorillard Co. . . . 
Ruben R. Schoenberg, named 
mid-western manager. Landers. Frary 
& Clark . . . Albert Carroll, ap- 




<OT QUITE CONVENTIONAL, but colorful, is KDKA-TV pa rac 

Pittsburgh, promoting station's Convention coverage. Model 

•heila Singer (on donkey): and (l-r) Nilclci Socora, Linda Glass, 



TEACHER OF THE YEAR award for $1,000, initiated by KIMN, 
)enver, goes to Mildred Snow — blind teacher-counselor — for her work 

sting blind and near-sighted children. Beside her (l-r) Dr. Edw. 
.rfuelhausen, principal, Eiber Elementary School; Cecil Heftel, station 

; J. M. Kyffin, asst. superintendent Jefferson County Public Schools 





NEW LIGHT for 'The Grotto,' KFMB (San Diego) show I 
Geoff Edwards (I) and aired from studio l7«/ 2 ft. below c 
presented in form of huge bulb by Mr. and Mrs. Bob Lee of r- 




KBUZ 
&KSDO 



The first word in fine music with 
high rated audience acceptance. 
KBUZ,* Phoenix and KSDO,** 
San Diego have located the adult 
audience and keep them listen- 
ing to your clients' message 
with full-time fine radio. 






V.&-, 



KBUZ Phoenix AM and FM 

KSDO San Diego AM 

THE GORDON BROADCASTING CO. 

"Sold nationally by Broadcast Time Sales 
••Sold nationally by Daren F. McGavren & Co. 



pointed special products manager. 
Pepsodent Division of Lever Brothers 
. . . Charles T. Woods, named di- 
rector of market research. Kitchens 
of Sara Lee . . . Leonard Mayer-. 
named director of market research. 
\ msco To* s. 



AGENCIES 



Apparently all marketing men 
don't eonsider "what is good for 
P&G is good for all eompanies 
in marketing." 

Stuart D. Watson. McCann-Mar- 
chalk chairman last week, speaking 
before the N. Y. Merchandising Exec- 
utives Club, termed the above an 
"erroneous theory." 

Y\ atson's theme was Marketing Or- 
ganization in the Sixties and his ma- 
jor point was that the decade would 
find marketers dealing more with 
specifics and less in theories. 

He also discussed 1 1 1 what are 
profit and loss responsibilities of vari- 
ous segments of the marketing depart- 
ments and (2 I how allocations should 
be handled for new product develop- 
ments. 

Agency appointments: Five Pepsi- 
Cola bottling companies in the greater 
Boston area to BBDO: Oneida Ltd. 
Silversmiths Sterling Silver and Stain- 
less steel Flatware Divisions to BBDO 
from JWT . . . KOMO-TV. Seattle, 
to McCann-Erickson office in that 
city . . . Monarch Wine I Mani- 
schewitz I to Grant, from Gumbinner 
billing SI million; Permaglas Divi- 
sion of A. 0. Smith Co., to Grant 
billins SI. 5 million . . . Lesli Profes- 
sional Home Facial Kits to Mohr & 
Eicoff. 

New Setup: Ralph Head, former 
BBDO marketing director, has or- 
ganized Ralph Head Affiliates, of- 
fering marketing services. 

Change of name: Roth! ardt & Hass 
Vgency, Chicago, currentlv billing s2 
million, has been bought out by 
Robert Hass and will go under that 



Anniversary Note: Kraft. Smith 
& Ehrig, Seattle, celebrated its 34th 



Admen on the move: Arthur B. 
Modell, to senior vice president, 
executive committee and plans board. 



SELLING 
POWER* 

for 
Kansas City's 

MILLION* 




Ray Eliingsen 



HOTOGRAPHY; 




photographic needs 

the kind of 

attention 

you like 

. . . backed by 

experience 

and artistry! 

Simply call 
DEIaware 7-7249 

or write to 

12 E. Grand An 

Chicago 



25 ji-ly I960 



passioned charges and countercharges have raised questions in the minds of many. The need for a 
•evaluation was weighed by a panel of distinguished guests on a recent WBBM -TV program. This is but 
e more example of the provocative local fare Chicagoans look for- and expect- on CBS Owned WBBM-TV. 
People who value their time find more that is worth watching on WBBM-TV. Which is why time is so 
luable on Channel 2, Chicago's top-rated television station for 60 consecutive Nielsen reports. 

WBBM -TV, CHANNEL 2 IN CHICAGO-CBS OWNED 



ORGANIZED LABOR-CRUSADE OR RACKET? 



Kastor Hilton Chesley Clifford & 
\lh.rton ... To v.p.'s at SSCB: 
Hermine Lueders and Norman B. 
Mullendore . . . To v.p.'s at Leo 
Burnett : Louis A. Kennedy and 
Raman W. Stullz . . . John Freeze, 
to v.p. Y&R, Holly wood .. . Roland G. 
James, to v.p.. Gever, Morev, Mad- 
den & Ballard . . . Maxfield S. Gib- 
bona, appointed v.p., Ketchum, Mac- 
Leod & Grove ... To v.p.'s and ac- 
count group managers at Klau-Van 
Pietersom-Dunlap, Milwaukee; Eu- 
gene E. Cooper and John D. Fin- 



ley . . . Julian L. Watkins, rejoins 
N. W. Ayer in an executive capacity 
. . . Walter Mayer, appointed media 
director. Wade Advertising. Los An- 
geles . . . Philip Wolf, named radio 
and tv director. Eisaman, Johns & 
Laws, Hollywood . . . Arnold Leeds, 
to tv executive producer, DCS&S . . . 
To group supervisors at DCS&S: 
Robert S. Morton and Sam Tarri- 
eone ... At Campbell-Mithun: Bob 
Thompson to media research and 
analysis supervisor; Bob Zsehunke 
to associate media director. 




YOU'RE ONLY 

HALF-COVERED 

IN NEBRASKA 



^^^\ 



IF YOU DON'T USE KOLN-TV! 




KOLN-TV DELIVERS THE 
MAXIMUM AUDIENCE IN NEBRASKA* 

Gunsmoke 98,000 homes 

Father Knows Best. . 86,500 homes 
6:00 p.m. News. . .84,400 homes 
10:00 p.m. News. .74,400 homes 



J/,<..'M ,<:!)/«/,<„, 




You can talk about TV markets in 
Nebraska until you're blue in the face; 
but when all's said and done, you'll come 
up with just two big ones — the extreme 
East and Lincoln-Land. 

In the East, you must choose from 
the three top TV stations covering the 
area. In Lincoln-Land it's no contest; 
KOLN-TV is the station, hands down. 
Latest Nielsen credits KOLN-TV with 
65J00 TV HOMES during prime 6 to 
9 p.m. viewing time. Compare this figure 
with that of ANY Omaha station! 

Ask Avery-Knodel for all the facts on 
KOLN-TV— the Official Basic CBS Outlet 
for South Central Nebraska and Northern 
Kansas. 



KOLN-TV 



More about personnel: Normaiu 
Kranz, named project chief for the| 
SCI Division of Communications At 
filiates, Chicago . . . Robert F. Agne,, 
appointed director of marketing re- 
search, Harold Cabot & Co., Boston 
. . . Fred Barrett, retired BBD()i 
v.p. in charge of media, joined Bus 
ness Development Associates . . 
Thomas M. Vincent, to Ogilv 
B&M as account executive ... At 
Earle Ludgin: Albert C. Mull, i 
and Howard L. Ballard to accoun 
executives . . . Melcon Tashian to 
SSCB from Grey . . . Norman R, 
Erickson to research manager 
Zimmer, Keller & Calvert. Detroit . . 
Harry Stoddart, appointed tv group 
head on Ford at K&E . . . Betty, 
Mandeville McGarrett, to broad- 
cast department, OB&M . . . Frank 
Stull. to account executive, C&W 
Chicago . . . Nelson O. Argueso< 
named treasurer, SSCB. 



An example of how a program 
concept can create the machinery 
to put it into syndication was pro« 
vided in Boston this week. 

The Frith Corporation waf 
formed to distribute Fashion Firs/: 
syndication's first fashion news series 
It has a cooperative advertising plai 
for national advertisers. 

The show recently completed a sue 
cessful 39 week local run on WHDH 
TV, Boston, sponsored by the Bai 
Bay Association. 

In syndication the show will pro!) 
ably be sponsored locally through 
Fashion First Advertisers Associate n 
in 15 markets. 

Julian Smith, board chairman 
Smithcraft, is president of Frith 
which acquired the tv show fro 
Parsons, Friedmann & Central, Inc. o 
Boston. 

Sales: CNFs Blue Angels to th 
Storer stations, WJBK-TV. Detroit 
WITI-TV. Milwaukee; WJW-TV 
Cleveland; WSPD-TV, Toledo, an 
WAGA-TV. Atlanta, and also I 
WABC-TV. New York . . . Officia 
Films' Greatest Headlines of tlie Ccti 
tury to WTVJ. Miami; WFMJ-TV 
Youngstown : KOMO-TV, Seattle 
KYW-TV, Cleveland, and KRCA-TY 
Sacramento . . . Medicine 1960 o 
KING-TV, Seattle, to Associate 

sponsor • 25 JULY 196 



[ "The Sound of Music over the City of Angels" 

ON THE ALL NEW 




Los 4*^ 
Angeles 



50^00 

WATTS 



THE NEW RGBS: now covers all the 
Southern California market with ten 
times the power... delivers more 
buying families per dollar invested 
than any other station in Los 
Angeles! New call letters to match 
KGBStyle programming: smooth, 
familiar music balanced by news 
eports, weather 
and traffic 
briefs 
...every 
spoken 
word creatively 
scripted, tastefully 
delivered! Still holds 
the same "action" spot 
at the center of the dial 
— 1020— now attracting 
more attention than ever 
with one of the largest audience 
promotion campaigns Los Angeles 
has ever seen. National Sales Representa- 
tive: Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., In Los Angeles: 
Dale Peterson, DUnkirk 8-2345- RGBS, 338 S. Western Avenue, 
Los Angeles 5, CaSfornia. Another Great Storer Station—in Los Angeles. 



In 



(HMD 

nothing 

sells 

like 




WJW 



the STORE R station 

backed by 33 years 

of responsible broadcasting 

CALL KATZ or 

National Sales Offices: 
625 Madison Ave., New York 22 
230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1 



Grocers, Inc. for the first six shows 
with option for the remaining six; 
the series will be telecast monthly 
starting in September . . . MGM-TV's 
Pete Smith Specialties, which in- 
cluded 101 theatrical shorts, started 
syndication sale with purchase bv 
WSPT-TV, Miami. 

International sales: CBS Films re- 
ports a 45.2' r increase in internation- 
al business for the first five months 
of 1960 compared to 1951. Sales in- 
crease in individual areas or countries 
included the following: Europe (con- 
tinental), 455%; Japan, 159%; Au- 
stralia, 56.9% ; Canada, 50.9% ; Latin 
America, 44.6%, and United King- 
dom, 15.2% . . . MGM-TV's National 
Velvet sold to the CBC in Canada 
and to four stations in Australia . . . 
Sterling's Silents Please sold to ABC 
I Australia I for September start. 

Promotion: Victor & Richards' Top 
10 Dance Party reports receipt of the 
following number of post cards in 
a contest for the syndicated teenage 
show: 12,480 cards to WTVD. Dur- 
ham: 10.129 cards to WJBF-TV. 
Augusta; 6,155 cards to WLIX-TV . 
Jackson-Lansing; 5.625 cards to 
WDEF-TV. Chattanooga; and 5.031 
cards to WHBQ-TV, Memphis . . . 
Screen Gems' Father Knous Best won 
the Freedom Foundation Medal for 
"24 Hours in Tyrantland," a film 
specially produced for a U. S. Savings 
Bond Drive and financed by the AFL- 
CIO. 

Commercials: MacLaren Advertis- 
ing of Toronto used Ampex Video- 
tape recorders at Meridian Films for 
a closed circuit presentation of ad- 
vertising plans for its client, Imperial 
Oil . . . Keitz & Herndon of Dallas, 
commercials producers, have incorpo- 
rated with Lawrence F. Herndon 
as president, R. K. Keitz as execu- 
tive vice president, Thomas R. 
Young as v. p. . . . Mel London 
appointed executive producer of the 
eastern division of Wilding. Inc. . . . 
Felix the Cat Creations, producers "I 
the tv film animated series of the 
<ame name, has formed a commercial 
film cartoon division at 355 Lexing- 
ton Avenue in New York. . . . WANE- 
TV. Ft. Wayne, produced 23 commer- 
cials of minute length within six 
hours from a remote in a new Pat- 
ferson-Fletcher-Northcrest store, 



moving to seven different sections of J 
the store; results were so good that I 
onl) four spots had to be redone, and I 
this was accomplished during the si? 
hour session. Slides and price supers I 
were inserted from the studio durin» 
the remote taping process. 

Programs : M & A Alexander Pro- 1 
ductions of Hollywood has com- 
pleted production on 70 of the 10(1 
Q. T. Hush, Private Eye cartoon seg- 
ments at Animation Associates . . . 
Heritage Productions is negoti- 
ating for production and distribution 
rights to Freedom From Fear and has 
placed Golf Tip of the Day in distri- 
bution; both are five minute series 
. . . Robert Lawrence Animation's 
first production venture in program- 
ing is Toy Box Time, a series of 
half hours composed of four seg- 
ments each. 

Strictly personnel: Russell Karp 

named contract negotiations director 
of Screen Gems . . . Ernie A. White 
joins GAC's sales development de- 
partment . . . Wynn Nathan, former 
MCA TV Ltd. v.p. and board mem- 
ber, has formed his own new com- 
pan\ . a tv producer's representative 
. . . Herb Pearson appointed execu- 
tive v.p. of Heritage Productions . . . 
Charles E. Norton named manager 
of Ampex International video mar- 
keting department. ... A number of 
NTA personnel will move from 
West Coast to New York assignments 
when the NTA home office is moved 
back to New York within 90 days. 



NETWORKS 



The sale of Groucho Marx this 
week to Lorillard (L&N) and 
Toni (North) last week could 
turn out one of NBC TV's more 
significant moves of the season. 

Why: it precludes NBC affiliates in 
two-station markets from taking the 
Untouchables live just because the 
Marx show was unsponsored. 

Part of Toni's deal: transfer of 
Toni's daytime business from CBS 
TV to NBC. Toni had been trying t<» 
get an alternate half-hour on CBS but 
tlio powers-that-be at that network 
couldn't deliver. 

I For background on that Untouch- 
ables threat to clearance of the Ernie 
Ford Show see 18 Julv SPONSOR- 
SCOPE, page 22.1 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY 196' 




4 




Another Addition to Our Proof Book 



Editorializing is not now a new concept in the communications 
industry. But it is new in the Heartland — news, in fact, to the 
"Kansas City Star", which reprinted our first effort in its entirety. 

WDAF will continue to editorialize whenever the community 
well-being is a matter of concern. It's tailor-made to our policy 
of delivering interesting, informative, provocative radio to the 
listeners in our big 6-state area. 



How is our policy of radio-to-be-listened-to paying off? Ask your 
Christal man to see our bulging "proofbook" of thoroughly 
satisfied advertisers. 



^ 



WDAF 610 RADIO 



SIGNAL HILL 



KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 



REPRESENTED BY 



BUY THE )^ 

SUPERLATIVE 
STATION 




E. Newton Wray, Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 
Represented by The Katz Agency, Inc. 



Top 3 AP 

Awards to 

WTAR& 

WTAR-TV 

WTAR-TV & Radio again have been 
cited by the Associated Press as best 
in Virginia in state and local TV news, 
women's TV news, and comprehensive 
radio news . . . making 27 AP awards 
received in the past 8 years by these 
stations for superior news broadcasting! 

This record is representative of the 
quality standards — in material, person- 
am I. programs, equipment, and operat- 
ing policy — that have made WTAR-TV 
and WTAR Radio the most influential 
broadcast media in the Tidewtar area! 
I In 1m -i cu-tomers, and more of them, 
tunc Id these stations. 

WTAR-TV WTAR 



Ch 


annel 3 




RADIO 
790 Kc. 




Norfolk, 


V 


rginia 


Rep- 


cscnted by Edward 


Petry & Co., Inc. 



NBC TV last week released its an- 
nual survey of eolor facilities 
available on all tv stations. 

The highlight of this report: 

• Three hundred and sixty-seven 
stations, or 70.6% of the 520 U. S. 
stations, are now equipped to re- 
broadcast color. 

• The 367 station represent 97.8% 
of total homes. 

• Of the 486 stations with network 
affiliation 354 (72.8% I can rebroad- 
cast color. 

• Comparable percentages for net- 
work affiliates with color equipment: 
NBC TV, 95.8%; CBS TV, 92.7^ 
and ABC TV, 47.5%. 

• Affiliates able to originate any 
tvpe of local color programing: NBC, 
52; CBS, 34; ABC, 24. 

I For list of stations equipped to 
broadcast local, both network and in- 
dependent, see SPONSOR'S MEDIA 
BASIC issue, due 1 August.) 

Aluminium (JWT) is finding it 
hard to get a decision from NBC 

TV as to whether Sunday afternoons 
will be available next season for its 
six Omnibus specials. 

NBC would prefer that Aluminium 
go on Saturday nights. 

NBC TV color schedule will 
amount to over 1,000 hours dur- 
ing 1960, 50% above last year's 
720 hours. 

Starting in September the Jack 
Paar Show will be broadcast in color 
four nights a week. In addition, there 
will be seven other color hours a 
week. 

Perfection of RCA's new 4401 Im- 
age Orthicon tube, which requires no 
greater lighting for color than for 
black-and-white, is a main factor in 
the expansion plans. 

Network tv sales : Block Drug Co. 

(SSCBl has purchased sponsorship 
in Riverboat, NBC TV hour-long 
series . . . General Food's Jell-O 
(FC&B) will sponsor the Little 
League World Series on 27 August, 
ABC TV . . . Purex will sponsor 12 
specials on NBC TV during the 1960- 
61 season — five nighttime and seven 
daytime . . . Peter Paul, Curtis 
Publishing, Dow Corning, Miles 
Laboratories, and Ex-Lax have 
purchased 134 quarter hours of the 
ABC TV daytime program schedule 
. . . Speidel has signed for full 
sponsorship of the Jackie Gleason 



H'GH 
RaTeP 

LOCAL 
PROGRAMMING 



MILWAUKEE 




NETWORK 



TV Capital of Wisconsin 




AVAILABILITIES 
IN THE LARGEST 

FILM LIBRARY 
IN THE MARKET! 

CALL BLAIR 



the STORER station 
backed by 33 years of 
responsible broadcasting I 



sponsor • 25 JULY 19 )(■ 




DAREN F. McGAVREN CO 



INC. 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES • SEATTLE • ST. LOUIS 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



UNIQUE 




FOR 

FARM NEWS! 

The only station in this rich 
agricultural market with a 
complete farm department! 

WOW-TV 

Channel J^ Omaha 

Blair-TV 



6 



A MEREDITH STATION \ 



BEST WAY TO EMBRACE THE NEW YORK 
NEGRO COMMUNITY... 




i *** 

When it comes to reaching the enor- 
mous Negro Community of greater New 
York, time buyers sum up their strat- 
egy in three little words: "LIB IT UP" 
The reasons are simple. Whether you 
sell a LIBation or appeal to the LIBido 
only WLIB can do- 
the effective job. f • ■-. 

mfjlm 

Hotel Theresa. 125th St-eet & 7th Avenue Nev. 

EMBRACES THE ENTIRE 
NEGRO MARKET IN GREATER NEW YORK 



Special to be aired on CBS TV in 
October. 

\«>t\*ork personnel notes: How- 
ard G. Barnes, appointed director 
of programs, administration. CBS 
TV, Hollywood ... At ABC TV: 
William C. Seaman to director of 
program services: George Patriek 
to manager of daytime program serv- 
ices: Richard Mumma to commer- 
cial co-ordinator . . . Richard J. 
Raburn, appointed controller. NBC. 



RADIO STATIONS 



The suburban stations with 
strong community orientation 
continue to come up with some- 
what different selling aproaches. 

Take as the latest case the Herald 
Tribune radio group which rings New 
York: it's offering a plan which gives 
the same sponsor triple five-minute 
expose daily on community service 
programs. 

The airing time: early morning, 
noon and late afternoon. There's no 
extra cost for the taped show for the 
other two times it's used. 

Noted the group: the tripling up 
gives the local sponsor maximum 
communitv identity with a particular 
species of service. 

Ideas at work: 

• Key, key, w here's the key: 
For 10 ' davs, WIP, Philadelphia, 
listeners lurked the city's streets, 
portable radio in hand. The idea: the 
station hid a key. somewhere in the 
citv. and broadcast clues as to its 
whereabouts. Winner received a sport? 
car. 

• Management flux: the Kroger 
Grocery Boy Show, aired on WING, 
Dayton, is handing out bundles of 
groceries to its audience. The idea: 
each dav a Kroger store manager is 
named "Manager of the Day" and his 
name is mentioned on the air twice 
during the morning. Lou Swanson. 
\\ IV, Grocen Bo^ - contacts listeners 
who ha\e submitted entr\ blanks and 
asks tbeni to identify the day's man- 
ager. \Y : >-< receive 125 certificates 

redeemable in produce. 

• Covered bv Yogurt: To mark 
Dannon Yogurts (Zlowe) sponsor- 
ship of the conventions on WOR. 
New York, the station had a model 
distributing; a pair of promotion but- 
ton- on Madison — one ursine conven- 



tion listening on WOR. the other| 
reading "Go Yogurt.*' 

• Roving reporters: KJLUE, 

Longview. Texas, is distributing "Pri- 
vate Eye"' membership cards to its lis- 
teners. The idea: card-holders can 
compete for the best news or special 
events story of the week. Winners re- 
ceive cash prizes. 

• Public scalping: KISN, Port- 
land, Ore., d.j. Mike Western, got his 
trimming in the picture window of 
the station's studio. Record spinner's 
been so busy with his off-the-air pro- 
duction work for the sales staff that 
he hasn't been able to make it to his 
barber. His buddies thought this a 
swell way to make it up to him. 

• Music's man of the year: The 
Better Music Broadcasters association 
named Arthur Fiedler "Man of the 
Year'' in music. WCRB, Boston, a 
member of the association, presented 
the award on "night at Pops'" in that 
city. Fiedler has been conductor of 
the orchestra for 31 years and re- 
ceived a 31-year-old bottle of wine 
and a motor scooter to commemorate 
the occasion. 

Thisa 'n' data: WSB, Atlanta, held 



MEMO FROM 

WHEN 

. . _. („t both 1 



-TV 



however, ana vembM 

contest. r hoice of 

countiyme"' 



WHEN -TV 



SPONSOR • 25 JILY 



J^A V W *% 




WAVE-TV Viewers Have 
28.8% MORE WRECKS! 

(therefore need new automobiles today, NOT tomorrow!) 



®From sign-on to sign-off in any average week, 
at least 28.8% more families watch WAVE-TV 
than any other television station in Kentucky. All this 
extra viewing just automatically means extra buying! 
WAVE-TV costs less per 1,000 than any other 
station around here. Much less! Don't just sit there 
and doubt it. Ask us or NBC Spot Sales for the proof! 



CHANNEL 3 • MAXIMUM POWER 
NBC 

LOUISVILLE 

NBC SPOT SALES, National Representatives 




PONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 




AE LOVES CB 

EVEN MORE THAN OLIVES OR LEMON TWISTS 

This AE may not know all he could about 
bridge, but he knows about bridge players . . . 
About their fantastic loyalty to the game . . . 
and to the show they refer to as "our show" — 
Championship Bridge. 10,000,000 bridge play- 
ers watch the show. They write thousands of 
letters of thanks to stations carrying "their" 
show. Their profile looks like many others 
except for a bulge from fatter billfolds. And 
they watch with unheard of interest. Avid. 
Our AE's client likes this interest. So does his 
comptroller. So does our AE who sold them 
the show. He likes being a hero. 
For a completely one-sided story, write or wire 
Walter Schwimmer, Inc., 75 East Wacker 
Drive, Chicago, Illinois. 

Championship Bridge 



"Championship Bridge with Charles Goren" resumes on 
ABC-TV Sunday. October 16. Minute announcements are 
available either on a 13/26 week or 26/26 week basis. 



a milking contest in one of the citj 
shopping centers . . . KDKA, Pittsi 
burgh, now aiding golfers, motorists! 
and shoppers by announcing waiting 
times on the public golf courses, traf] 
fie conditions, and best-buys in fo< 
. . . WCPO, Cincinnati, conducting 
teen-age dances during the summa 
months from Ault Park . . . KIMNj 
Denver, sponsored a "Teacher of the 
Year" contest — $1,000 awarded t( 
the teacher and $500 to the student 
submitting the winning letter . . 
WPAT-AM-FM, New York, h< 
opened a midwest sales office in Chi 
cago . . . KATZ, St. Louis, a full-tim 
Negro independent, received the high- 
est ratings for the 6 p.m. to midnighj 
time slot in the July Pulse . 
KHOU-TV, Houston, supplied frj 
tapes of the Presidential Far East trip 
to KHUL-FM, which ran one-houi 
after the tv exposure ... Pet Milk'! 
Third annual Grand Ole Opry Talen 
Contest aired on 200 Keystone sta 
tions . . . KPOJ, Portland, Ore., dis 
tributed 5,000 fans to office workei 
to tie in with a recent station promo 
tion . . . WFEA, Manchester. N. H.' 
distributed accumulated profits to 1(1 
participating members of its PensioJ 
and Profit Sharing plan . . . Bu-im - 
notes: Amoco Gas purchased exclul 
sive broadcast rights for two Gianl 
football exhibition games on WCBSI 
New York; Hygrade Foods ha? sign--< 
for quarter-sponsorship of U. ol 
Washington's sports broadcasts ni 
KING, Seattle. 



! 



Station acquisitions: WWIL, Foi 
Lauderdale, purchased b\ William 
Roberts for $400,000. Transacts 
handled by W. B. Grimes & Co. 
C-B-T. a Rollins Broadcasting subsidy 
ary. buying WCHS-AM-TV, Charlei 
ton, for approximately S3 million. 

Kudos: WPKM, Tampa, recipij 
of the U. S. Army's award for oul 
standing public service in cooperatioi 
with the third army's enlistment pio 
gram . . . Mary Jo Tierney awardei 
the AFTRA Award for "Best Radi* 
Woman Performer" for hostessinJ 
For Women Only, WTCN, MinnJ 
apolis-St. Paul. 

Station staffers: Norman W. Lof| 
thus, to general manager. KDFSI 
Palm Springs . . . Jack Macdonaldl 
to promotion director, KVI, SeattlJ 
. . . Sidney Arthur, named comnvr| 



25 july 196f 



!al manager, WXFM, Elmwood Park. 
''. . . . Ed Forester, to sales staff. 
NBC, New York . . . Don Benet 
commercial manager, WKRL, Bill 
Ugs . . . H. Malcolm Stuart, to ac 
>unt executive, QXR Network . . 
10 account executives at WPAT-AM 
At: William Codus, Winston 
nirby, and Leonard Levitt. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



avid E. Cassidy has joined RKO 
.eneral as assistant to the vice 
resident in charge of broad- 
isting, Hathaway Watson. 

r Cassidy 's background includes 
lints with the Boiling Company as 
Angeles managers, Radio TV 
eps, and manager of John E. Pear- 
!>n's Los Angeles office. He will 
f ake his headquarters in New York. 

Bep appointments — stations: 
GHL, Billings, Mont., and WVEC, 
^ampton, Va., to Devney-O'Connell 
,j . Capital City Group stations WOL, 
Washington, WNAV, Annapolis, and 
fDOV, Dover, Del., to Breen & 
tard . . . WKAN, Kankakee, 111., to 
Jadio-Tv Reps . . . WLYN, Lynn, 
>|ass. and WTSA, Brattleboro, Vt., to 
fettell-Carter for New England . . . 
AN, Caribbean, to Pan Ameri- 
in Broadcasting as international 
'P- 

orrection: KCMJ, Palm Springs. 
United Spot Sales for national 
presentation. JALCO will continue 
' represent the station in Los Angeles 
|id Southern California. 

ew Office: George P. Holling. 

jiery has opened its eighth branch 
ice in Dallas with George L. Pettett 
manager. 



W 



ep appointments — personnel : 

amed v.p.s at Trand Associates: 
'avid N. Simmons for radio pro- 
raming and marketing; Buddy 
larke for sales, publicity, and pro- 
motion ... To the sales staff of Har- 
ngton, Righter & Parsons; Jay 
falters and Dick Gardner . . . 
eter Kadetsky, to account execu- 
ve, Kettell-Carter. 



TV STATIONS 



jleas at work: 

I • Mass innoculation: WJAR- 




AE LOVES CB 

EVEN MORE THAN CANCELLED CONFERENCES 

Account Executives are not always Right. 
There is usually a research director or a mar- 
keting manager or a media buyer or a client 
to point up this fact. But once in a while they 
luck out. Like the other day when three 
different clients had regional problems. AE sug- 
gested Championship Bowling, market-by- 
market. Each client said fine, knew it was the 
top filmed sports show for six straight years. 
Research blessed the audience profile, market- 
ing applauded the merchandising potential, and 
media knew the cost per thousand is fantasti- 
cally low. They all said, "AE, you are Right." 
AE's wanting to avoid a persecution complex, 
write or wire, Walter Schwimmer, Inc. 
75 East Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois. 

Championship Bowling 



"Championship Bowling" can be bought as an houi 
show or a half hour show every week, or as a half houi 
every other week, nationally or in selected markets. 



''ONSOR • 25 JULY 1960 



I 



SELLING 
POWER* 

for 
Kansas City's 
MILLION* 




CHANNEL 5 

station with the 

tall tower 
KCMO-TV 







INTRODUCING THE NEW 

DRYDEV EAST 

HOTEL 

39th St., East of Lexington Ave. 

NEW YORK 

Salon-size rooms • Terraces • New 
appointments, newly decorated • 
New 21" color TV • FM radio • New 
controlled air conditioning • New 
extension phones in bathroom • New 
private cocktail bar • Choice East 
Side, midtown area • A new concept 
of service. Prompt, pleasant, un- 
obtrusive. 



Robert Sarason, General Manager 
ORegon 9-3900 



T\ -AM. Pro\ idenee. held a free polio 
clinic and broke the world's record 
for mass innoculation. Within eight 
hours. 11.108 shots were administered 
\>\ h\po-spray injection guns. Re- 
in.it.' cameras showed viewers the 
method used for the mass injection 
and radio interviews were broadcast 
from the clinic. All Rhode Island sta- 
tions cooperated by urging listeners 
to attend the clinic and help stop the 
near epidemic. 

• Independents Day: WTTY. 
Indianapolis, hosted a breakfast for 
advertisers, agencies and the press, 
and submitted its "Declaration of In- 
dependents'" presentation. The idea: 
by using closed circuit tv and live 
dialogue, the station demonstrated to 
its guests the value of placing spot 
money on the independent tv station. 
A booklet, including coverage and 
marketing information, major attrac- 
tions of the station, and a summary 
of the presentation was presented to 
all guests. 

• Timebuyers tested: WCHS- 
T\ . Charleston, tested timebuvers 
throughout the nation as to their CH 
' Charleston Quotient, of course i . 
Typical question — In TA CHS-TV 
Land. George W ashington: 1 I crossed 
the Delaware 2 1 did not sleep here 
3 1 helped salvage Braddocks defeat 
4 i is program director. Part II of the 
contest — in 10 words or less "Why 
WCHS-TV is a Good TV Buv." Win- 
ner received a long weekend for two 
at a posh hotel, all expenses paid, plus 
baby-sitter fees. 

• Special screening : WMT-TV. 
Cedar Rapids, ran a special "closed 
circuit"' showing for the city's young- 
er members. The idea: parents whose 
kiddies' bedtime comes earlier than 
The Four Just Men feel that their off- 
spring are missing something — the 
Rath "Knuckles" and "Nellie" com- 
mercials. Hence — the special showing. 

Thisa 'n' data: WXYZ-TV. Detroit, 
prepared a booklet to supplement its 
free tv courses for political candidates 
. . . WLOS-TV, Greenville-Asheville- 
Spartanburg. N. C. to celebrate its 
recent high ratings, treated local chil- 
dren to animal rides hired from a 
traveling circus . . . CO-OP Industries 
sponsored the telecast of the largest 
local soapbox derby over Vk AK.R. 
Akron . . . Taft Broadcasting an- 
nounced that net earnings for the first 
fiscal quarter, showed an 18.795 in- 




on the NEW WCOL 



ACTION: Client purchases spo 
package . . . WCOL prepares "flift| 
proof" taped commercials . 
sales message is single spott: 
delivered during "selective . p 
gramming", rated FIRST in 60 sej 

■ ments from 9 a.m. to midnig' 
(Pulse. Hooper, Nielsen) 
REACTION: People listen . 
pie hear . . . people buy! 
MORAL: Get greater sales act ot 

' through listener reaction, on « 
NEW WCOL! 

i CAPITAL STATION 
" COLUMBUS 15, OHIO 
!30 AM 24-hours-a-day-broadcasting 
I 923 F M ■■'^f!^. Represented by: 

+** robert e. eastman > 



IN GREENVILLE- 
S. C's 1st MARKET 



LEADS 




Ask us or 

AVERY-KNODEL 

for the facts about our leadershif 

WFBC 

5,000 WATTS- 19 HOURS DAIL> 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Offered with WORD, Spartanburc 

S. C. as the PIEDMONT GROUP 

AFFILIATED WITH WFBC-TV 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 





5 -CmrTV/RADJ0 



SUBSCRIBER 



Our apologies to 

Atlanta, St. Louis, Boston, 

Dallas and some other cities! 

The new 5-City Directory, just off the press, 
contains more than 1900 listings, and 36 pages. 

It's the recognized tv/radio guide to 5 cities 
where 93% of all national spot business is 
bought. 

The 1960 directory is substantially bigger than 
any of its predecessors. You will find it more 
useful, and we hope you will forgive us if your 
city is not included. 

If you're a SPONSOR subscriber drop us a note 
and we'll send you a 5-City Directory with our 
compliments. 

If not, the price is 50£ each . . . 40£ in quanti- 
ties of 5 to 10 ... 30£ for 10 or more. 

If you're not a subscriber, enter your subscrip- 
tion now by using the form shown on this page. 
We'll send you, as a bonus, not only the 5-City 
Directory but also the 220 page 1959-60 Air 
Media Basics including Radio Basics, Tv 
Basics, Timebuying Basics, and much more. 



25 july 1960 




Sponsor Publications Inc. 

40 East 49th St., New York 17, N. Y. 

□ Send me copies of Sponsor's 5-city directory. 

□ Enter my subscription to Sponsor 

for one year at $8.00 and send me FREE 
the 5-CITY DIRECTORY & AIR MEDIA BASICS. 



NAME 

TITLE 

COMPANY _ 
ADDRESS- 
CITY 




crease over the same period for 19 
and declared a cash dividend of J 
per share . . . Kudo: WPST-Tl 

Miami, recipient of the Civic Leagi 
of Miami Beach Public Seni 
Award. 

On the personnel front : Peter J 
Kennev, appointed station manad 
WRC-TV, Washington . . . Mel I 
vine, named assistant to the genei 
manager, WCAU-TV, Philadelphia . 
Rieharcl Beesemyer, to sales i 
ager. KNXT. Hollywood . . . Mag« 
Stair, to national sales coordinato 
WWL-TV. New Orleans . . . Thoni 
R. Nunan, Jr., to Crosley Broadca* 
ing as director of marketing 
munications . . . Riehard C. Dre 
fuss, to program director, WSAZ-T 
Huntington, West Va. . . . Robe 
D. J. Leahv, to manager of husine 
affairs, WSUN-AM-TV. St. Petei 
burg . . . Bob Reed, to program-pr 
duction manager. WPTA-TV. Fo 
Wayne . . . James M. Henneberr 
to director of advertising, sale 
motion and public relations. WIC 
Springfield, and WCHU. Champai* 
. . . Claude Donica, to account exe 
utive, KVOO-TV, Tulsa. 



TRENDEX 

( Continued from page 37 I 
"last-purchased" in its type by 110* 
more homes which could correct 
identify the sponsor (25.0%) the 
among those which couldn't (11.9 r o 

Facial tissues : Sponsoring 
western, this item tabbed sales 62' 
higher in the female selector horn 
(62.5$ I than in the non-fen 
I 38. 4', ). Sales were 115% great 
in the homes correctly identify ing tl 
sponsor (83.3%) than in those wh 
didn't (38.7', i. 

Toothpaste: Sponsoring a ha 
hour drama, this toiletries produ 
netted a 50% sales gain in the fenia 
selector homes (42.0%) over the no 
female (28.0%), and a 25% increa 
in the homes correctly identifying tl 
sponsor (44.0%) than in those whi< 
didn't (35.0%). 

As Mr. Reilly noted to buyers 
over the country in a recent lette 
"This demonstrates, we feel, the ir 
portance of a media buying fa 
about which little was known befo 
this: involvement in the selection of 
tv program by a potential purchasf 
may result in a dramatically high* 
purchase rate of the product adve 
tised on that program." 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY \% 




those who live on air... 



I the last three decades advertisers and their agencies 
t,'e spent billions of dollars on air. A lot of people 
^d on it. A lot of goods were moved. 

f ! those who live on air SPONSOR serves a function 

I I other publication can match, for SPONSOR is 
1 : most definitive study of air in the broadcast in- 
i,stry. It is the news of air— the plans of air— the 
)j)gress of air— the thoughts of air— the very life of 
;!— delivered to you every week — 52 weeks a year. 

Ipsf every man who's gotten anywhere in air reads 
: )ONSOR. The man who wants to get there faster 
ids SPONSOR at home— because the very chem- 
ry of broadcasting— the factors that make it move 



and earn its salt are just much too important for 
light reading on a routing list. 

If you live on air — read SPONSOR at home. Read 
it on A time, B time or C time but make sure it's 
free time at home. At the price of only $8 a year you 
can have 52 issues of this most useful publication in 
the field at your side — to see, study, tear out and file. 
It's the best investment you'll ever make. Order your 
home subscription today. 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



You Reach 
1.433.000 



RADIO! 



Rounsaville Radio programs to a 
positively receptive audience of 1,433,000 
Negroes with an annual cash income of 
824 million dollars! They spend 80 r ( of 
it for consumer goods— name brand, 
quality products. But the ONLY way to 
get your share of this buying-power is 
through the medium preferred by 95% 
of all Negroes— Negro Radio! And, in 
six important metropolitan markets Negro 
Radio is Rounsaville Radio ! Any budget 
you make for these markets must include 
Rounsaville Radio or you completely miss 
this 5824,000,000 consumer group! Get 
the facts about Rounsaville's six number- 
one rated stations ! Call Rounsaville Radio 
in Atlanta, John E. Pearson or Dora- 
Clayton in the Southeast today! 



Personal Letter 






tha 



dom 



irstand the Negro 
to know why Negro 
so singularly ef- 
s a sales medium. 
lie Radio is more 
i the 



Negro— it is a daily necessity! Proof of 
Know-How is the Negro's quick, loyal response 
to products advertised on Rounsaville Radio . 
Let us tell him about your products. Rounsaville 
Radio is one of the oldest and the largest 
broadcasters in Negro Radio. 



AROLD F 



ALKER 

•I Sales Mgr. 



FIRST U. S. NEGRO-PROGRAMMED CHAIN 
FIRST IN RATING IN SIX BIG MARKETS 

WCIN 1,000 Watts (5,000 Watts soon)-Cin- 

cinnati's only all Negro-Programmed Station! 

WLOU 5,000 Watts - Louisville's only all 

Negro-Programmed Station! 

WMBM 5,000 Watts— Miami-Miami Beach's 

only full time Negro-Programmed Station! 

WVOL 5,000 Watts — Nashville's only all 

Negro-Programmed Station! 

WYLD 1,000 Watts-New Orleans' only full 

time Negro-Programmed Station! 

WTMP 5,000 Watts— Tampa-St. Petersburg's 

only all Negro-Programmed Station! 

Buy One or All— Discounts With Two or More! 



WU 



ROUNSAVILLE 
RADIO STATIONS 



JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 



' -^ 







. and WKBS. Ne 



NEWSMAKER] 



Perry S. Samuels has assumed his ne* 
post of general manager of WBNY, Buffali 
a station of the Straus Broadcasting Grou] 
The newly appointed manager who. unti : 
this time, was account executive 
WMCA. New York, started in the industr 
as an announcer. His announcing caree 
included stints with WGAY, Silver Sprinj 
Maryland, WPAZ, Pottstown. Penns< 
j York. In 1956. when Samuels joined WMCJ 




he was responsible for development of retail and national account! 

Richard E. Nason has been named gen- 
eral manager of KFRC Radio. San Fran- 
cisco, an RKO General station. He comes 
from CKLW, Detroit, where he was radio 
sales manager. Prior to that, Nason held 
the post of general manager of WGBI, 
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre. and of the W est 
Virginia Radio Corp. He has also served 
as assistant to the president of WJIM-AM- 
TV, Lansing, and as account executive at KABL, Oakland-San Frar 
cisco. During W.W. II, Nason served as a combat correspond 

Walter E. Barrlerr, who has been actii 
general manager of \^ L\^ -C. Columb 
since early June, has been appointed ge 
eral manager of the station. He had be< 
sales manager since 1958, after a three-ye 
stint with the Indianapolis Times as general 
advertising manager. Earlier, Bartlett val 
a sales executive with WLW-C for twJ 
years. He started his career as national 
sales representative for the Columbus Citizen l now the Citizen J 
nal) . Following that, he joined the radio station for the first 1 

Archibald Foster has been elected to the 

executive committee at Ted Bates. He has 

been with the agency since 1954 and 

current!) serves as a director, senior 

vice president and account group head. 

Before joining Bates, Foster was associated 

with Cecil & Presbrey Advertising as a 

vice president and member of the executive 

committee. In 1946, he was a junior 

account executive with A. W. Lewin Company. Foster joined 1 

first as an account executive and three years later was appointed v.pj 





• 25 juli 19* 



:\Fl 


jfj 5( 1 


i - ^ 



La&e spe/z/ over 100 days in Alabama's Kilby 
Prison observing prison life — and the prisoners 
themselves — firsthand. His reports sparked ap- 
pointment of a special commission of the Ala- 
bama legislature which is bringing about a com- 
plete revamping of the Alabama penal system. 




Lake stayed on the "Phenix City" story contin- 
uously for six-and-a-half months . . . from the 
time of the murder of the Alabama attorney gen- 
eral nominee and the calling out of the national 
guard to the final indictment of 1500 persons and 
the demise of "America's Wickedest City." 



Former City Editor of The Birmingham News . . . 

Ace Reporter for Miami Herald 

CLANCY LAKE 

named News Director 
for WAPI & WAPI-TV 

Clancy Lake, the man who 
shocked America with his 
coverage of the Phenix 
City cleanup . . . The man 
who spent 3 months in pri- 
son to report on condi- 
i tions in the Alabama Penal 
I 1 system . . . The man who 
worked seven years to free a convicted mur- 
derer he knew was innocent. . . . has now 
turned his news reporting abilities to broad- 
cast news and it is with pride that WAPI 
and WAPI-TV announce his appointment 
as News Director. 





j (Left) While reporting on a snake-handling cult which had come into 

■ Alabama, Lake observed snake handlers demonstrating their faith by 

handling live copperheads. Two worshipers were killed . . . and Lake's 

I stories helped lead to new state laws designed to prevent such rites. 

(Right) Lake carried on a one-man crusade and appeared before the 
I pardon and parole board 14 times and secured the assistance of "The 

Court of Last Resort" on behalf of Ellis Fewell, sentenced to 30 years 
| imprisonment for murder. After seven years Lake finally won a full 

pardon for Fewell. 



WAPI 

TELEVISION AND RADIO, BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

WAPI-TV Represented nationally by Harrington, Rlghter & 

Parsons 
WAPI-Radio Represented nationally by Henry I. Christal 



25 july 1960 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Watch out for the salesman from the discount station, the one who works with 
a "rubber card and can always offer a 'deal,' " warns Gordon Davis, general 
manager of WIND, Chicago. He draws a clear, detailed picture of the con 
man-type techniques and pitches most often used by the salesmen whose sta- 
tion is suffering a drop in audience. Among them: reduction of rates and 
placing some spots in traffic time, but many others on a floating basis. "The 
best stations dont sell on price, Davis concludes, they sell on value." 

MEMO TO A YOUNG TIMEBUYER 




■ ou have only one responsibility: Do the best job pos- 
sible for your client. Make the best buy. Get him a sched- 
ule of spots that'll make his sales soar. 

But you wish it were as easy to do as it is to say. They 
swarm all over you — the nice guys from all the reps and 
all the stations. They offer proof positive that they repre- 
sent the dominant stations, that their sales response is un- 
matched, that each is a "best buy." 

And out of the hundreds who call upon you, a minority 
group begins to emerge: The salesmen with the under-the- 
table rate, the ones who work with a rubber card and can 
always offer a "deal." 

Of course, a red flag should go up when this happens, 
but these salesmen too are nice guys. No horns on their 
heads. And they've got facts and figures and a basketful 
of "bonus spots" and a flurry of audience percentage fig- 
ures to throw at you. And they also tell good stories and 
they're good fun over a martini — and why shouldn't you 
listen? 

You should, only recognize that you're talking to a sales- 
man from a discount station. He's selling you on your own 
hopes, he's selling you a story which will sound great when 
you report it back to the client, but he isn't selling you 
what you most need: A better-than-average chance to make 
your clients sales soar. 

Beyond that, all his protestations to the contrary, he's 
probably not selling you a good "deal" by any yardstick. 

Who makes these kinds of pitches? In case after case 
they're usually from stations whose audiences have dropped 
in this highly changeable medium, but which could not 
lose face by reducing rates. Their management is often 
well-known in the trade, their faces appearing on industry 
committees, symbols of business and moral rectitude. 

But they're in trouble. Expenses keep rising, audiences 
dropping; their only recourse is to sell on a "deal" basis. 

Why do you buy any station? Because of a guarantee 
of a certain number of advertising impressions per dollar 



80 



spent. Or because the station has a quality of audience 
and programing which you think has response value for 
your client. Perhaps, too, the station has a unique commu- 
nity-involvement story which could deliver a certain kind 
of audience to you. But you should never buy alone on 
price, and if you do, you should very carefully check the 
nature of the buy you have made. 

For after such a buy is made, a small voice must] 
whisper in the buyer's ear: "Yes, but are you still getting 
the lowest price?" Already, our industry has spawned the 
apocryphal story of one timebuyer describing to another 
the terrific buy he had made on a station, only to find the 
second buyer had gotten the same package at a lower price. 

Of course, there's a gentleman's agreement involve li 
when the salesman tells you he'll make a special deal. The| 
agreement is that you don't look too closely at what y 
get. You have a suspicion that the station which se 
below its published rates could be suspected of violati 
other broadcasting practices, too, but you don't ask. Y 
know you can brag about the spots you got in traffic tir 
but you're willing to overlook the others to be schedul 
by the station on a floating basis. He knows you'll report 
"terrific bonus spots," but he also knows you won't say 
that they were scheduled at 3 a.m., or at 11:30 p.m. on fm. 

He knows — since in a way you're obligated to him bt 
cause of the tremendous deal he set up for you — that youj 
can't insist too much on product protection. 

He also knows that you'd never tell your client that sorm 
if not all, of your spots are back-to-back-to-back-to-back. 

The under-the-counter deal you get for the salesman 
with a rubber rate card is the same as the deal vou 
when you buy a non-name appliance from a store \\ hit I 
sends it out in a plain, unmarked crate. They'll deliver tl 
goods to you all right (at a slight charge), hut whethe 
they can deliver the goods for you is another matter. 

The best stores and the best stations don't sell on prio 

They sell on value. ^ 




Take the strongest local sports programming in the 

>arolinas; team it up with the stand-outs of 

>oth NBC and ABC. It figures— another winner in the format 

hat's changing things in Charlotte television. 

Here in America's 25th largest television homes market 

'ou can get more for your advertising dollar on WSOC-TV. . . 

|)ne of the great area stations of the nation. 

I 



CHARLOTTE 9-NBC and ABC. Represented by H-R 



WSOC and WSOC-TV are associated with WSB and WSB-TV, Atlanta; WHIO and WHIO-TV. Dayton 

sponsor • 25 july 1960 81 



SPONSOR 



Ominous note in the platform 

Madison Avenue, America's No. 1 whipping boy, came in 
for the usual amount of flogging by the speakers at the recent 
Democratic Convention in Los Angeles. 

Even though ex-adman Chet Bowles stands high in the 
Party councils, no one was particularly surprised when Key- 
noter Church lambasted the Administration for its Madison 
Avenue "barrage of bland ballyhoo." 

But a much more ominous note (for broadcasters and ad- 
vertisers too) was struck by a phrase in the Democratic plat- 
form which scored "the exploitation of sadistic violence as 
popular entertainment." 

Apparently Democratic policy makers (at least some of 
them ) intend to focus attention on a criticism of tv that is 
already pretty widespread. 

Both FCC Chairman Ford, and responsible NAB leaders 
have called on the industry to do something about the exces- 
sive crime and violence in tv programing. 

We urge action on this problem now, before it becomes an 
even more serious political issue. 

Radio programing in the '60's 

Philip K. Eberly of WSBA, York, Pa., in a recent speech 
before the Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters spelled 
out in detail what we have been saying about the importance 
of programing in the decade ahead. 

Said Mr. Eberly, "Programing in the '60's, more than at 
any time in radio's short history, must perform a greater serv- 
ice for the listener, and at the same time be more resultful to 
the advertiser." 

Pointing out that "to serve the advertiser best is to serve the 
listener first," he called for a greater production of new pro- 
gram ideas, and offered some practical suggestions — "Don't 
turn down, without consideration, any idea, even from your 
janitor . . . keep in touch with your listeners . . . re-examine 
your programing constantly and try always to improve it. . . . 
Don't go in for adulterated imitations of your competitors' 
programs . . . sharpen up your own ideas . . . put as much 
showmanship into public service programing as into any 
other type." 

This is healthy advice for both radio and t\ programers. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Captive audience: When the warden 
of an Ohio jail threatened to lilac k 
out the telecast of a major spoil- 
event unless the inmates produced ; 
missing club, the prisoners responded 
by coming up with a dozen club-. 
files, saws, and numerous other blunt 
instruments. — TV Guide 

Out-of-home listening: It seems 
that during the warm months the bu/.. 
zards down in Uvalde I Texas i make 
their homes in tv antennas. 

One tv cable corporation, plagued 
by the birds, decided to take action 
and piped the audio section of KONO- 
TV, San Antonio up onto the roof. 

The buzzards no longer roost, but 
fly in lazy circles over the antennas, 
probably in search of leftovers from 
the Untouchables. 

Research: A radio farm director was 
in town complaining about his hard 
luck the other day. 

It turns out he had developed 
great way of saving money by teach- 
ing animals how to live on nothing 

To demonstrate his theory 
bought a horse and began to teach ill 
by gradually reducing its ration <>f| 
oats. But just when the horse lu.dl 
learned, it died. 

Re repeats: Tv's memory is so->cl 

In spring, winter and fall. 
But during the summer. 
It has total recall. 
— Will Conwaj 

Politics: CBS newsman Douglas Ecfi 

wards in Los Angeles to cover then 
Convention, discovered one day la-t: 
week that he was driving in the wronfl 
direction. He pulled over to the side! 
and engaged in this exchange with al 
nearby patrolman: 

"Am I allowed to make a U-turn| 
here, officer?" 

"No," replied the policeman. "TheH 
only place you can make a U-turn is 
where there's a sign saying so." 

Then after a brief pause he added 

"And we don't have an\ signs like j 
that in Los Angeles." 

Easy listening: TV Guide quotas I 
Sam Lutz. Lawrence \\ elk'- person \\ 
representative, as describing theB 
\\ elk -bow as '"the onl\ t\ show \< u ' j 
can watch while \ou r re reading thejl 
paper." 

SPONSOR • 25 J I LY VX J 




rf Are you serious? I wouldn't 
consider buying the competition!" 



That's what so many of our steady adver- 
tisers say. Who needs wasteful duplicate 
coverage, when WING in DAYTON delivers 
more audience than any other Dayton station 
ever has! Get the FACTS from your East/Man 
or General Manager Dale Moudy. 

robert e. eastman & co., m 

national representative 



TIMEBUYERS... 

write a caption for this picture 
and WIN $25 CASH! Deadline 
August 7. Winning caption will 
appear in August 22 issue. Give k 
your entry to your East/Man. m 
or mail to WING, Talbott Bid".. f 
Dayton 2, Ohio. 
This Month's Caption Winner: 
Roy Terzi, Dancer, Fitzgerald, 
Sample in New York. 




WING in DAYTON 

? TRAILS stations are WEZE, Boston; WKLO, Louisville; WING, Dayton; WCOL, Columbus; and WIZE, Springfield, Ohio. 



NOW! NEW! 



Stories that begin where 
OFFICIAL POLICE ACTION LEAVES OFF! 




1 AUGUST 1960 



fHE WEEKLi 



RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



^5^1 WESTERN UNION 

TELEGRAM 




Iart holt= 

RADIO STATION V/YSL BF L0 = 
THEY .AID SAN-FRANCISCO AND BUFFALO WERE DIFFERENT BUT 

« " '^ "» T - C ^^^E°R NS o"-rB £ D ST 
RAT.NGS WYSL. BUFFALO PULSE ^ 1^ IM UPPER 

-■s s jts. -rLsrr r-,; ™ 

EQUALLY GOUU k$ tq y()u anQ 

VICTORY FOR US= ^^ mclendon==# 




/EcLendon 
stations... 

jation's highest 
! rated group 

L , ^riSt 



AIR MEDIA'S 
CAMPAIGN TAB: 
$10 MILLION 

Earmarked for tv — 
§8 million, whether or 
not Congress passes 
equal free time bill 

Page 29 



How pay tv 
came out in 
Canadian test 

Page 32 

Charms change 
in copy hikes 
sales 20% 

Page 38 

Viewing up over 
last year- 
Tv Basics 

Page 41 





THE 




TOUCH 



"Nothing endures but personal qualities." 

These words from the pen of Walt Whitman 
account for the great music which has endured 
the years. Each composition reflects the 
personal qualities of its composer. This same 
reflection could easily be applied to quality radio 
and television stations of today . . . the dedicated 
efforts of those behind the scenes to constantly 
build and maintain a quality image. 




TELEVISION oTT 
RADIO obcnbc • DALLAS 



BROADCAST S 



The Original Station Reprtsentatire 




LAND OF 



AND YEAR-ROUND SPENDING, TOO! & 



The 52 county Tallahassee, Florida — 
Thomasville, Georgia area, served exclu- 
sively in its entirety by WCTV, is far en- 
ough South to afford its happy citizens 
year-round good living yet far enough 
North to permit it to escape the feast-or- 
famine business climate sometimes result- 
ing from tourism. 



This means high-level year-round spend- 
ing - - - Tallahassee actually stands fifth 
in the U. S. in retail sales per household*. 
That's why so many leading brands place 
strong, long-term spot schedules on 
WCTV. Get the full story from Blair Tele- 
vision Associates. 
* Annual Survey of Buying Power, 1959. 




WCTV 



TALLAHASSEE 



CD 



<§> 



THOMASVILLE 



a John H. Phipps 
Broadcasting Station 
TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 

National Representatives 



'ONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



NASHVILLE'S 

WSIX-TV 

Now offers 

Quality. ..with NEWEST 

VIDEOTAPE* 




the fastest way to sell 
the Central South 



Simplified, economical production . . . the 
quickest way to get your sales message 
across. In Tennessee WSIX TV offers you 
the latest model VIDEOTAPE* television — 
improved circuitry insures brilliant repro- 
duction. Complete facilities for both re- 
cording and playback ... or send us any 
tape that's been recorded on an Ampex 
VR-1000 for immediate scheduling. 




> LAND OF THE 
CENTRAL SOUTH 






© Vol. 14, No. 31 • 1 AUGUST I960 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS (J 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Their tv tab: $8 million 

29 Republicans and Democrats will probably spend 80% of their ad budgets 
in broadcast, bulk in tv. Here are some tv techniques, plans evolving 

Pay tv looks good in Canadian test 

32 Current pay tv test in Canada proves potent threat to commercial tv. 
First of two-part special article from Canadian sponsor tells story 

How sex appeal sells gasoline 

34 Here's how gasoline advertiser ties in with sex, via 43 tv stations inj 
19 eastern markets for splendid results; shifts to spot radio in su 

TvB digs up new data on daytime tv 

36 Medium is offered to advertisers as both a "mass" and a "selective* 
salesman, TvB presentation cites "cost efficiency," variety of buys 

Change in Charms radio copy hikes sales 20% 

38 New soft-sell technique in spot radio sets peak sales record for Charms 
Candy company adds $50,000 to radio budget for heavier fall progranj 

Only radio reaches grass roots, says Globe 

3d Scranton department store dominates one station, uses saturation schedl 
ules to reach distant shoppers. Store execs report outstanding sales 

WAVE style books ask for 'English' 

40 "Re-introduction to the public of the English language in broadcast 
ing" aim of Louisville radio-tv outlets' continuity and news style book] 

Tv sets-in-use level remains firm 

41 Nielsen's March Week I study shows tv public is increasing viewin; 
last year to 45 hours per week. Included in section: Comparagrap; 



FEATURES 

12 Commercial Commentary 

56 Film-Scope 

24 49th and Madison 

60 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

60 Picture Wrap-Up 

16 Reps at Work 

68 Seller's Viewpoint 



SO Sponsor Asks 

58 Sponsor Hears 

19 Sponsor-Scope 

70 Sponsor Speaks 

26 Spot Buys 

70 Ten-Second Spots 

66 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

55 Washington Week 



EH3 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive Editorial, Circulation 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: ML 
Hill 8-2772 Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. iirming! 
Office: 3617 8th Ave. South. Phone: FAirfax 2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Su' 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm * 
Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada r- -" 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year, 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St. " 
by SPONSOR Publications '— 



other Western Hemisphere Countries $' I 
jingle copias 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Ad< • 
. .17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekl 
2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



1960 Sponsor Publication* In 



WHO radio continues 

to dominate 
Iowa radio audience! 

"Voice of the Middle West" 
serves America's 14th largest radio market 

£1 URVEYS have measured the Iowa radio audi- radio families residing within WHO Radio's NCS 

3 ence for 23 consecutive years. A new 93-County No. 2 coverage area — America's 14th largest radio 

rea* Pulse Survey proves — as have all the others market. And in all this area, WHO Radio is an 

-that 50,000-Watt WHO Radio is again Iowa's important voice! 

>ost listened-to station. WH Radio reaches more people, more often 

Iowa radio families have again given WHO Radio anc j at / ess cost than any other station or combination 

"clean sweep" with first place in every week-day f stations in Iowa. And, for a qualifying food or 

uarter hour surveyed. Competition came from more drug advertiser, WHO Radio offers Feature Mer- 

lan 85 other stations serving this area. In fact, chandising services — operated and controlled by 

3,000- Watt WHO Radio's audience outstrips that trained WHO Radio personnel. See your PGW 

E the next two stations combined during the three Colonel about reaching all of Iowa plus lots more 

lajor week-day broadcast segments (6 a.m.-Noon, with WHO Radio! 



Ioon-6 p.m., 6 p.m.-10:30 p.m.) 
But these ratings tell only part 
present only 72% (625,000 of 865,350) of the witT'ioSTp^Tt^Ii. 



But these ratings tell only part of the story. They *"* owa PL Y S " T L cons , ists of the 137 counties in Iowa > M ^ ™> 

Illinois and Nebraska in which NCS No. 2 credits WHO Radio 



WHO 

for Iowa PLUS! 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

NBC Affiliate 

WHO Radio is pare of Central Broadcasting Company, I 

which also owns and operates 

WHO-TV, Des Moines; WOC-TV, Davenport 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 
Robert H. Harter, Sales Manager 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., Representatives 



nail down 

more 
sales 




it 

with 

SAN ANTONIO'S 




ABC Television in Son Antonio . . . 

the Greatest Unduplicated Live 

Coverage in South Texas! 

Represented by 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Richard P. Jones, tvho left Leo Burnett five years ago to joii 
J. Walter Thompson's media department, this iceek took ovet 
the media director's post there from Arthur H. Porter, ttii* 
responsibility for one of the dozen or so largest agency 
radio/tv spot budgets, estimated in 1959 at 814.5 million 

The newsmaker: Richard P. Jones, J. Walter Thompsc 
v.p.. whose elevation from manager to director of the media depart 
ment was announced this week by president Norman H. Strouse. 

Jones joined J. Walter Thompson in 1955 as associate media di 
rector and was named v.p. and manager in 1958. He succeeds Ar| 
thur H. Porter, who moves into account management. 

Before joining Thompson. Jones was with Leo Burnett in Chica 
for six years and with D'Arcy in St. Louis for eight. The latter o| 
these two assignments was also in media. 

Jones" new capacity entails responsibility for one of the largea 
agency media departments in the field, ranking among the dozei 
largest for radio tv spot spending 
of all agencies, with its estimated 
$14.5 million total in both areas 
in 1959. 

J. Walter Thompson's large spot 
pocketbook has often been ob- 
scured by its enormous total air 
media billings, which was S135.5 
million last year, estimated to be 
one-third higher than any other 
agency. 

J. Walter Thompsons important 
SI 1 million in tv spot and S3. 5 
million in spot radio, estimated to 
be the ninth and fourteenth highest in each group, constitute colled 
tivelv only one-eighth of the agency's tv network outlay, said to bj 
$120 million — which is. incidentally, some $50 million more tlial 
either of the next two agencies. 

Jones' policies are expected to be largely a continuation of J. Waltel 
Thompson's attitudes toward media. However. Jones anticipates I 
"slight increase" of 1960 spot spending over 1959. 

Jones will be watched closely for any shifts in J. Walter ThoridJ 
son's relative network and spot spending. All 10 agencies trailing 
Thompson as air media users, spend a higher proportion in spo 
than J. Walter Thompson, and three actually spend more in spol 
than they do in network. If Thompson's imbalance in favor of nel 
work spending is leveled out. the result could be an enormous actusj 
increase in spot spending next year. W. 

SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1961 




[chard P. Jor 




Jack Sterling 




• 




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I I El 1 1 

Arthur Godfrey 

mill 1111 

Mil Hill 
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1,461,200 different homes each 
day, 3,131,700 different homes 
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A cumulative rating of 33.5% 
daily and 71.8% weekly of the 
total radio homes in the vast 17- 
county New York area (Cumula- 
tive Pulse Audience, March 1960). 
ONLY WCBS Radio in all of 
New York radio offers this combi- 
nation of top talents and prestige 
programming: Jack Sterling, 
Dick Noel, Martha Wright, Allen 
Gray, Freeman & Hayes, Arthur 
Godfrey, Lanny Ross, Garry 
Moore, Ed Joyce, Bing Crosby, 
Lee Jordan, Rosemary Clooney 
—plus, daytime dramas, special 
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WCBS Radio attracts the biggest 
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Want to call on more different 
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Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales. 



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what has an eye^Lpatc 



Two things. 

One — it points out how brilliant a job 
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the advertiser who does it generally 
winds up with the business. 

The moral is obvious. 

Which brings up two things more. 

One — there are some 7500 men and women 
involved in the purchase of national spot. 
Of this number — the top 2000 control over 



7 • #7 O UT this number — the top ^UUU control ov 

(10 Willi yOU . 95% of the total business. We call them 



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"KNOE-LAND" 



NO, THIS 15 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1,520,100 Drug Sales $ 40.355,000 

Households 423,600 Automotive Sales S 299.539,000 

Consumer Spendable Income General Merchandise S 14S. 789.000 

SI. 761. 169.000 Total Retail Sales S1.2S6.255, 000 
Food Sales S 300.486,000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 79.1 % SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to March 1960 ARB we average 79.1"; share of audience from 
9 am. to midnight, 7 days a week. 



k 


\X f 1 K 1 


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CBS • ABC 


JV 


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A James A. Noe Station 




Channel 8 
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Represented by 
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oa Mm />,.-.. w— 


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SPONSOR 



Executive Vice President 

Bernard Piatt 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMiHin 
New* Editor 
Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor 
Alfred J. Jaffa 
Senior Editor 
Jane Pinkerton 



Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 



Ben Seff 
Lloyd Kaplan 
Walter F. Scanlon 

:- £ -e- 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Barbara Wiggins 

Editorial Research 

Helene Etelson 

Barbara Parkinson 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 

Sales Manager 

Arthur E. Breider 



Eastern Office 

Willard Dougherty 



Western Manager 

George Dietrich 



Production 

Phyllis Waldbrand 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT! 



Virgin 



Markey 



ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

S. T. Massimino, Assistant to Pub'isher I 
La_ra O. Paperman, Accounting ManeM 

George Becker: Anne Marie Cooper: I 

Michael Crocco: Syd Guttman; Wilke I 

Rich; Irene Sulzbach; Dorothy Tinker: I 
Flora Tomadelli 

SPONSOR s 1 AUGUST 19 X J 




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E NTE RTA INMENT 



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CALL OR WRITE US OR ASK ANY KATZ AGENCY 



AUGUST 1960 



man, that WSUN RADIO 

AS strictly from 
SQUARESVILLE! 

I mean, man, for me it's 
nowhere. Like there's n 
real swingin', screamin' 

announcers . . . none of then? 
crazy sirens, gongs and all 
that cool noise. And the 
music doesn't come on 
with a crash and really rock 
you. I mean. Dad. if you 
want to be shook . . . like 
really rattled . . . don't 
listen to 



WSUN 



RADIO 
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BUT... 

If you want to reach the solid, 

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"SUNNY" is the 

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620 KC 



TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG 




Natl. Rep: VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL 
S.E. Rep: JAMES S. AYERS 






by John E. McMiWd 

Commercial 
commentary 




Adlai Stevenson's tv code 

Governor Adlai E. Stevenson, writing as a — 
summer replacement guest for John Crosby, has 
come up with a ''campaign tv code'" for political 
parties which makes a good deal of sense as far 
as it goes. 

But it goes a pitifully short distance. 

In fact it seems to me that Mr. Stevenson, in 
prescribing for the maladies of political tv, has 
run the gamut from A to a point slightly beyond B. but has cavalieilj 
refused to consider the rest of the long dolorous alphabet. 

His four-point code includes a proposal that the parties shoulc 
reach an agreement on the total amount of tv time to be purchased 

I think most of us would say amen to that. And would heartily 
agree with the Governor that a "presidential election should not be 
competition in which one group tries to outspend the other." 

But the balance of his code contains only these suggestions 

1 i Republicans and Democrats should use nothing but '"straight 
forward speeches or talks' and "bona fide press conferences'" in th< 
tv campaigning. 

2 I Thev should agree to ban "film dialogue in which a candidal 
appears to be talking extemporaneously," as well as "actors employe* 
to represent racial or geographical groups." and "'theatrical props oi 
contrived little dramas." 

3 i Tv spots should be used with "restraint and circumspection. 
No spots should be less than five minutes. 

In support of these proposals. Mr. Stevenson who apparently i 
still smarting over the tv messages prepared by Rosser Reeves of Tec 
Bates for the 1952 Eisenhower campaign, has this to say 

"I realize that many tv technicians feel that the American peopl 
won't listen to straightforward speeches . . . that the employment o 
dramatic tricks is necessarv to sustain public interest in politics 

"I think this is nonsense. I have too much faith in the America 
people to think thev must be treated like children." 

Yes, but can you name 10? 

Now just a minute, Governor. 

I am afraid I sense in your remarks some of that same, unhaj >■ 
anti-Madison Avenue and anti-tv bias which has distinguished a gr-^a 
deal of political demogoguery in recent weeks. 

And I respect vou too much not to call you on it. 

I am sure I speak for many "tv technicians" ( not including Mrl 
Reeves i when I tell vou that the reason we dislike straight political 
speeches on tv is not because we distrust the American people. 

It is because we distrust American politicians. 

Having listened in bug-eyed horror to all that flannel-mind >d| 

flannel-mouthed oratory at the recent Conventions. I dare you tdj 

i Please turn to page 14) 

SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST l'.'tW 







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SAUVE 
QUI 

PEUT 



(or women and schedules first?) 



A heavyweight H-R salesman (195 pounds), two 
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schedules* are trapped on the third floor of a hot 
agency. In fact, the building is burning. 
Two baskets are attached to opposite ends of a rope 
which is strung across a pulley outside a window. 
When one basket is grounded, the other is at third- 
floor-window level. However, there is only one way 
to utilize this device: by placing a heavier weight in 
one basket than the other. The weight of human 
being(s) in the descending basket must not exceed 
that of the other by more than 15 pounds, because 
lives would be endangered. This restriction does not 
hold for the WMAL-TV schedules. They can take it. 
Naturally, you can depend on the H-R salesman. 
How did he save all? 

Burn up the mails — send solution pronto. First- 
time winners will receive a free copy of Dudeney's 
hot opus 'Amusements in Mathematics" — Dover 
Publications. Repeat winners will receive other 
valuable prizes. 

"Weighty, indeed — due to WMAL-TV's emergence as the 
Number One nighttime audience leader (ARB and Nielsen}. 
Summer advertisers on WMAL-TV's Straw Hat Plan win 
ex officio via audience increases of as much as 15% without 
additional cost. 



wmal-tv 

Channel 7 Washington, D. C. 

An Evening Star Station, represented by H-R Television, Inc. 



filiated with WMAL and WMAL-FM, Washington, D.C.; WSVA-TV and WSVA, Harrisonburg, Va. 

ONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 13 



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Commercial commentary (Cont. jrom P . i 



tr\ to name 10 men from both parties land this includes 100 I 
senators and 50 state governors) who are even remotely capable 
making an intelligent, straightforward, and effective tv speech. 

I don't believe you can do it. 

Your fellow political leaders, most of them, are approaching 
with the hoary cliches, the pot-bellied rhetoric, and the dreai 
mindlessness of an 1850 stump speaker. And none of us in the 
business have ever insulted the American public as grossly as soi 
of them did at Los Angeles and Chicago. 

But don't get me wrong, Mr. Stevenson. 

I am not suggesting that the alternative to such bombast should i 
"contrived little dramas." Most mature men in tv and in advertisin 
I and there are a good many of us I share completely your contem! 
for the fake, the phony, and the contrived. We agree with you, to 
that a statesman should not be judged on his "abilities as an act' 

But the ability to think straight, to write straight and to spei 
straight is a proper measure of a man in many if not most profq 
sions. And we believe we have a right to expect it in our statesme 

A tv catechism for politicians 

As to tv techniques, we think it would be healthy if politician 
stopped listening to the dilettantes and adolescents of our busine^ 

These are the knuckleheads I we have a lot of them l who babble 
about the importance of make-up and camera angles and the propj 
"image" — who insist that the secret of tv success lies in knowing hd 
to read a TelePrompTer so that even your best friends don't realize 

Tv technique does not start with these things. Nor are they ev 
very important. 

The first rule for any sound tv presentation is — have material lit § 
is worth presenting, and thoroughly understand it yourself. 

The second rule land this applies to political speeches as well 
to any other kind of tv I is — have the skill, the patience, the expel 
ence, and above all the self discipline to organize your material mm 
a form that makes for quick, effective, sympathetic communicat, 
with your audience. 

The third rule — breathe into your presentation the life, the Kgj 
and the truth of your own character and personality. In a polit 
speech this cannot be done by tired hacks, or pallid ghost write) 

Obviously, Governor Stevenson, there is no need to lecture 
personally on such painfully elementary principles. 

As much as any man in public life you have demonstrated that \<j| 
understand and have thoroughly mastered them. 

But the same cannot be said for most of your political confr«*r| 
in the Democratic and Republican parties. 

Tv. as you have pointed out, is an almost hideously expensij 
medium. To waste time on tv is a sign of irresponsible recklessnea 
And I believe that any politician, before making a tv appearand 
should be forced to answer three rude questions: 

1 I What the hell are you trying to say? 

2 l To whom do you think you're saying it? 

3) What do you hope to accomplish with this speech? 

If you could ever write such a catechism into a political tv con 
I can promise you that it would "improve tv as an effective h$ I 
ment for the communication of political views." 

And it would make all of us in television so very grateful. m 






SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST l'XB 




* 








LISTENERS . . . JEWELERS . . . CUSTOMERS . . . CLIENTS . . . YOU ! 

The Quality Swiss Watch Promotion was a whopping big 
success ... for everyone! 

Last winter, radio stations designed audience-promotion con- 
tests to boost the Watchmakers of Switzerland radio campaign. 
Their purpose: Increase listenership . . . get more people into 
jewelry stores. 

With a nation-wide network of creative heads at work, the 
contests could only be sensational and spectacular. And they 
were! So are the results: Increased Listener Interest . . . Higher 
Ratings . . . Better Watch Sales . . . More Store Traffic I Everything 
a promotion should do— and a little bit more. 

So everybody's happy! Congratulations to all! 



Special Kudos and a Watchmaker of Switzerland 
Plaque to these three stations for an A - 1 job: 

KWK, St. Louis, Mo Markets 1-10 

WCCO, Minneapolis, Minn Markets 11-20 

WCPO, Cincinnati, Ohio Markets 21-30 

Formal Presentation: 

July 27th . . . Cunningham & Walsh Inc., 

260 Madison Ave., N. Y. 16, N. Y. 



I 



{- The Watchmakers of Switzerland 



• 1 AUGUST 1960 



YOU 
KCAN'T 
KCOVER 

TEXAS 

without 



KCEN-TV 




M. P. ! 

also stands for military 
pay roll ... the buying 
power of 6 Central 
Texas bases zero-ed 
in on our call signal. 



CHANNEL, 





Reps at work 



ft 




Paul Kingsley, manager. San Francisco office. Broadcast Time Sals 
feels that the nation would indeed be chaotic if consumers purchase 
products by the numbers. "Imagine a hypothetical world whei 
products are rated in terms of popularity, and consumers onlv pu 
chased the sales leaders. Everybody would buy the top sellir 
brands, to the exclusion of all oth- 
ers. That was the way radio time- 
buying operated until fairly re- 
cently. But as timebuyers matured 
professionally, remember timebuy- 
ing is only a generation old. they 
lost their old dependence on radio 
and lost their fear of striking out 
into new. creative buying channels. 
Today's timebuyers understand that 
ratings are indications, nothing 
more, and their importance is 
pre-empted bv numerous facets of 

a station's operation and character."" Paul points out that n 
of a station's features cannot be measured. "The percentag< 
faithful listeners who actually are motivated to buy advert 
products may be considerably higher than the ratings indicate, 
cept for special studies, ratings do not reveal purchasing pow 



Joe Hogan, Katz Agency. Chicago, has some random though 
this broadcast advertising business. "It's very much of a 'hand 
business." ... of course now millions of dollars are negotiat< 
phone, the schedule runs and after it's all over, the contracts i 
for signature. ... I personally regret the honest mistakes mai 
both buyer and rep that mus 
mately be absorbed by the st 
and how about the agency an 

ttion. for that matter, which. f< 
i ^^ pediencv. permit a film sale 

1 *S»^ j to nominate particular station 

time slots for syndicated filn 
disregarding the recommends 
made by media experts. . . 
about secretaries, well that's I 
thing else again. . . . For one 
I think that they're badly 
named. . . . Mathematician, pull 
relations counselor, station expert, information seeker, availabi ii 
compiler, anv of these would be more appropriate, if inadequate -I 
something else about that, if a rep's secretary is good, then he's greJ 
but if she's not. then it's all up for him. . . . And you know wha:,| 
do believe there are very few cynics in any phase of this business! 




SPONSOR 



1 AUGUST 1 '6i 

1 




pNSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



WJIM-TV 

LANSING 

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wnc 

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ST. LOUIS 

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TAMPA -ST. PETERSBURG 



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OPPORTUNE 

Each group of letters at thi 
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our entire personnel and 
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to supply advertisers and 
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BLAIR-P 



Television's first exclusive 
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Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR -SCOPE 



I AUGUST I960 Fancy this unusual move in the Ford dealer hierarchy: using half -hour syndi- 

CfloyriBht ism cated shows two-three times a week in at least 20 markets for 52 weeks in prime time. 

In any event, that's the call that went out of J WT New York last week. 

The starting date would be late September. Said the agency : if the stations didn't 
have the shows under contract, the client would bring them in. 

Echoed in the Ford flourish is something the Chrysler agencies have been hearing 
from the dealers: they want shows of their own so that they can do some real grass- 
roots selling and garner identity for themselves. 

Difference between the Ford and Chrysler local ad fund patterns : The Ford dealers get 
an outside sum per car, while the Chrysler dealers split the billings 50/50 with the 
factory, thereby giving the parent company control. 

Action on spot tv for the fall, some of its beefing up of current schedules, 
picked up considerably on Michigan Avenue last week. 

Among the Chicago business: Peter Pan Peanut Butter (McCann) ; Sheaffer Pen 
(BBDO) ; Brown Shoe (Burnett) ; Paper Mate (FCB) ; Pfizer (Burnett) ; May bel line 
(Gordon Best) ; Lever's Pink Liquid Swan (NLB) ; Camay and Lava (Burnett) ; Goetz 
Brewing (John W. Shaw). 

Out of Cleveland: G. E. Lamps (BBDO). 

In New York Morse International put out a call for Vick availabilities, with a 3 
October start; day and evening segments and fringe minutes; 20 weeks. 

What may turn out to be quite a sleeper for radio, both network and spot : 
ALD, Inc., an independent franchiser of Westinghouse automatic laundry and drier 
equipment. 

The buys to date, out of Herbert Baker Chicago : four-week campaigns on NBC, ABC 
and Mutual plus spot in 39 markets. Expenditure: $125,000. 

ALD's function: helps a prospective operator of a laundry stand find the right 
location, estimates his gross income and expenses, designs the store and installs the 
equipment, provides a repairman, etc. 

Sales pitch on radio: housewives, use the laundromats rather than mess around 
at home with obsolete equipment. 

The networks are urging affiliates to get tie-in announcements from ALD's local franchise 
holders. 

Never put it beyond a network to put the pitch on for spot — that is, when it 
serves the network's immediate purpose: it's happening at ABC TV's daytime op- 
eration. 

The ABC sales stratagem takes this line: 

• We admittedly can't deliver most of the important two-station markets in the 
daytime. 

• These constitute 15% of all U.S. homes. 

• Hence we suggest you take 15% of your proposed expenditure and apportion it 
up for spot in these uncovered markets. 

• The aggregate sum for network and spot would still be much less than the ad- 
vertiser would have to pay for full coverage on a competitive network. 

The combination concept has already worked: it was sold to Brillo (JWT) as part of 
a day and night scatter plan. 

ust 1960 19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Lever Bros, is doing a sort of reevaluation of what local rating service it wa' 
its five agencies to subscribe to so that there'll be a uniform source. 

Right now ARB is Lever's required yardstick, but, as a result of some Nielsen sa 
nudging, Lever agencies have been asked to listen to Nielsen's latest pitch on its lo< 
services. 

ARB in the meantime has been pitching hard at P&G in the same area. 

The last time Lever took a sounding on what its agencies preferred, ARB won out 
one vote. 

Here are the local services that each of the Lever agencies subscribe to: 

ARB only: OBM, K&E, BBDO; Nielsen only: none; both ARB and Nielsen: J\S 
FC&B, SSC&B, NL&B. 

One of those notable spot successes in the service area, the National Assoc 
tion of Insurance Agents (Dor emus), started last week to set itself up for the bi 
ance of 1960. 

It's buying 150-odd markets in tv for 13 weeks, starting 10 September, using spoi 
news or weather segments. Ultimate objective: 180 markets. 

Tv will be supplemented with radio in Virginia and Delaware. 

Chicago reps can douse those fears that the juicy Alberto-Culver account (, 
cently switched to Compton) will have the spot buying done in New York. 

The information from New York Compton to SPONSOR-SCOPE: only Alberto-Culve; 
network will be bought in New York; the buying of spot remains in Chicago. 

On the debit side for Chicago reps is this : DFS New York will handle all buying f 
Simoniz, which had been doing its spending via Y&R Chicago. 

Sellers of spot radio might find the going much easier on the national front If 
they found out just what sort of information is needed to get the medium fav«J 
able consideration at the plans board level. 

This commentary is the sum and substance of what SPONSOR-SCOPE has heard latjl 
from many account executives and supervisors. 

Radio, they point out, has changed both as an instrument of service and aei 
competitive force. 

The plans board needs to know in terms of facts, figures and use what these chandl 
have been and how they fit in with the client's present marketing problems ail 
needs. 

For instance: (1) ratings are just a nibble at the true dimensions of listening I 
cause of the distribution of sets about the home; (2) radio's ability to deliver a s| 
cialized as well as mass audience; (3) a sharper index to the extent and variety of oj 
door listening. 

What the accountmen say would be of great help: if the sellers of spot radio maj 
greater use of the agency's media analysts in getting the message to them. 

General Motors really started something: now it's Ford that's going the way I 
network nighttime spot carriers. 

The buy: a total of eight minutes over the last two weeks in September spread over fJ 
shows. It's to introduce the Ford Division 1961 models. 

E. F. Mueller (DCSS) will be back in spot radio this September, with mc| 
markets and more stations. 

The plan — calling for the usual daytime saturation — should be moving into the tir I 
buying stage within two weeks. 

Likely digit dimensions: 65 markets from Maine to Florida and west to I 
troit; at least two stations in each market; 33-34 weeks. 

SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1SI 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



With the conventions out of the way, ABC TV and NBC TV sales are now trying 
to rake in billings from what's left unsponsored of election night coverage. 

The asking prices: 

ABC TV: $100,000 for six commercial minutes to be inserted between 9 p.m. and 
3 a.m. (Full sponsorship may be had for $600,000.) 

NBC TV: $300,000 for seven commercial minutes between 9 p.m. and 4 a.m. (The 
remaining 5/12 open is available to a single advertiser for $750,000.) 

Apparent reason for the big difference in prices: (1) more stations; (2) the resound- 
ing convention click of the Huntley-Brinkley team. 

The fabulously successful Sara Lee Kitchens (C&W) has suddenly burst out as 
a prospective sponsor of tv specials. 

It's talking to NBC about co-sharing five of them during the coming season. 

The strategy : five different types of shows so that it can on each occasion drum up 
heaps of excitement among Sara Lee salesmen. 

Four more tv network series have joined the spot carrier clan, making a total 
of 26 of them now available. 

The latest show on which participations can be bought: Person to Person and All 
Those Bells, CBS TV; Tall Man and Klondike, NBC TV. 

Bringing you up to date on the spot carrier sweepstakes by network: 

NETWORK NUMBER HOURS INVOLVED 

ABC TV 13 12 

CBS TV 5 31/2 

NBC TV 8 7 

Total 26 2214 

General Mills continues to pour its advertising largess into NBC TV. 

Add to that $1 million that just went to that network via BBDO for daytime another 
couple million or so out of DFS. 

No small part of the new money will go for alternate week sponsorship of the Tab 
Hunter Show. (NBC already has $9.5 million in General Mills billings.) 

Seriously plaguing NBC TV and CBS TV at the moment is this problem: get- 
ting the affiliates — and it doesn't apply only to two-station markets — to clear for 
sponsored programs in the 10:30-11 p.m. slot. 

With CBS the situation is not so harrowing, since it doesn't involve, in contrast with NBC, 
any threats of cancellation. These clearance problem children include : 

June Allyson Show (CBS) : the balking has something to do with the fact that the 
preceding half-hour looks as though it will be unsold. 

Eyewitness to History (CBS) : the network feels confident it will overcome all pockets 
of resistance because of the Washington climate anent public service programing. 

This Is Your Life (NBC) : it's touch and go whether Warner-Lambert will go through 
with this buy unless the network can shortly produce a satisfactory station list. 

Lawless Years (NBC) : there's a good chance of Alberto-Culver pulling out if an am- 
ple number of stations aren't available. 

People Are Funny (NBC) : Squibbs' interested if sufficient stations will take. 

Trade comment : the networks' stations relation department obviously have a big 
job cut out for them ; also : the spot clearance horizon looks favorable. 

• 1 AUGUST 1960 21 






SPONSOR-SCOPE 



The week's windfall for national spot radio: the Gasoline Tax Educations 
Committee's (SSCB) six-seven week campaign in over 100 markets, starting 1 Aup 

Segments: 10, 20 and 30s in traffic time and weekends, with 20 spots a week where 
single station is used in a market and 10 a week each when two stations are used. 

SSCB explained that this campaign did not emerge from the American Petroleum Insfl 
tute, a SSCB account, but was jointly subsidized by the entire oil industrv. 

Canada's easement of the rules on beer advertising in tv isn't helping the Di 
minion's broadcasters. 

The Canadian brewers who've been sponsoring programs on this side of the border hai 
elected to stay put, despite strong political pressure. 

The apparent reason: the U.S. stations continue to get a bigger share of the G 
nadian audience within reach of the American signals. 

Reps with radio stations in upper New York state were perplexed by L&N's 
fort to get the local rate for an account that's been regularly paying the nations 
rate, namely Stokely Van Frozen Foods Division. 

The New York L&N office explained that it was making the local rate offer at the n 
quest of its San Francisco branch. The schedule was to be a tie-in with local supei 
market chains. 

Rejoined the reps: if the local rate were granted in this case, wouldn't it be incumbe| 
on the agency to get the local rate for all its national accounts? 






22 



For those agencies that are occasionally called upon by a client to compar 
the cost of network tv time costs over the past three years, here's how it stacks up o 
the basis of a one-time rate for a maximum hookup: 

NETWORK FALL OF 1957 FALL OF 1960 

ABC TV 860,000 564,500 

CBS TV 68,000 79.200 

NBC TV 63,500 77,700 

Note: in the interim there's also been an appreciable increase in number of stati 

BBDO New York's media buying is going through a process of redesigning 

What media chief Herbert Maneloveg has basically in mind: revise the bu; 
groups so that each best fits the needs of the individual clients. 

In other words, if an account bills $20 million and it's about evenly split between 
media and print, ample recognition will be given to radio-tv in the supervisor)' setup, the 
establishing a proper balance of authority. 

Another innovation Maneloveg is pushing: making every media buyer convert 
with all media so that each can be shifted back and forth as the operations 
quire. Right now trainees are being given guidance on both print and air media. 

Maneloveg also hopes to develop enough media buying power within BBDO's ra 
for promotion purposes, instead of having to raid other agencies. 

The political parties can be expected to put their spending in the forthcoming 
campaign — both national and Congressional — at an all-time high. 

One thing that can be expected from the Democrats: lots of quarter-hours for dij 
cussion programs on local stations, that is, if they're available. 

John F. Kennedy found out they worked like a charm when he was running again 
Hubert Humphrey in West Virginia. 

For other news coverage In thi» issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page a 
Spot Buys, page 48; News and Idea Wrap-Up. page 60: Washington Week, page 55: SPOHSi 
Hears, page 58; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 66; and Film-Scope, page 56. 

SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST V.6 




FARM STUDENTS EYE NEW PAS 

... in tde S£cwd o^ (jlWIb and TO&ney 

And what a bountiful future! . . . Thriving cities, bustling towns, ex- 
panding farms, and a way of life modern as Manhattan. In this Magna 
Cum Laude market, we submit: 

1. Channel 2 for those extra Counties. 

2. CBS for the best in Public Service. 

3. 400,000 TV homes for greener pastures. 





AE LOVES CB 

EVEN MORE THAN CANCELLED CONFERENCES 

Account Executives are not always Right. 
There is usually a research director or a mar- 
keting manager or a media buyer or a client 
to point up this fact. But once in a while they 
luck out. Like the other day when three 
different clients had regional problems. AE sug- 
gested Championship Bowling, market-by- 
market. Each client said fine, knew it was the 
top filmed sports show for six straight years. 
Research blessed the audience profile, market- 
ing applauded the merchandising potential, and 
media knew the cost per thousand is fantasti- 
cally low. They all said. "AE. you are Right." 
AE's wanting to avoid a persecution complex, 
write or wire. Walter Schwimmer. Inc. 
75 East Wacker Drive. Chicago. Illinois. 

Championship Bowling 



49th a 
Madisc 



"Championship Bowling" can be bought as an hour 
show or a half hour show every week, or as a half hour 
every other week, nationally or in selected markets. 



In with Top 100 

\^ ith the infrequent inclusion of M^ k . 
belline in connection with spot tv 
metic advertisers. I wonder if you < 
not aware that they are among I 
Top 100 largest spot advertisers 
television. 

I refer, now. in particular to 
item on Page 22 of your June 2 
issue, third paragraph, about beai 
preparation manufacturers and i 
time users of tv. You state, 
spicuous among the missing : Revl >i 
I believe vou will find Maybeili 
as large a user of nighttime tv n 
if not larger than Revlon. May I « 
gest you check the volume of M 
belline spots the first or second qn 
ter of 1960. 

Ray M. Kirtlai 
vice president 
Gordon Best < 
Chicago 



Mutual Benefit 

My sincere congratulations to 
Henry at WCKR in Miami for a 
job of selling, in getting the ffiOJ 
fur his all night show from the M\ 
Herald. This is in fact a tremer.d 
blow for the good cause. 

Mr. Henry's letter to "49th 
Mad.."' 25 July. said, "this proz 
has a unique approach for a n< 
paper to advertise itself on radio 
commercial contents, and the wav 
program will be handled, both iri 
allv and bv the personality. e« 
this program worthy of recogniti j 
the industry. It is most unusual, 
will agree, that a newspaper 
spend this kind of money on a "t 
budget, so you can well imagine 1 
effective the program must have t 
to convince the management of 
Miami Herald to go ahead v 
WCKR's Miami at Night." 

We have the feeling that Mr. Hel 

SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST ll 



ould have included the fact that it 
esn't hurt for the newspaper to 
n 42 1 L . r c of the radio station 
her. 

Murry Woroner 
station manager 
WAM-E 
Miami 



connection with your article on 
changing shopping habits in 
lerica ("New Interest in Radio's 
st Word'"— sponsor, 25 July), I 
sending along the initial digest 
a research project which we 
,/e underway on shopping center 
itations. Among the findings: 
ytime vists last an average of only 
^2 minutes. Nighttime visits last 
average of 51 minutes. 
We expect to have a much more 
,ailed report within the next 60 
s and we certainly would be 
ased to let you have a copy when 
liable. 

R. T. Anderson 
mgr., res. & market dev. 
National Advertising Co. 
Bedford Park, 111. 

•NSOR correction: 

thanks to sponsor for their re- 
ting of our taping of the commer- 
s for Koerner Motors, Inc. Fish- 
Festival (page 66, 18 July 1960 

NSOR). 

Jowever. WROC-TV is Channel 5 
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, not 
OC (which is in Rochester. Min- 
Pta) as reported. We are always 
ig confused, which makes it more 
resting for both of us. 
I is of interest to note that al- 
igh other media (newspapers) 
e used, a dealer salesman survey re- 
ed that more than 75% of the 
)le and customers who came in for 
event said television brought 
o in. 

|he advertiser found this such a 
lessful promotion that the same 
I lod was employed for its opera- 
in Syracuse, 80 miles to the east 
{ochester. New York. 

Walton Smith 
promotion director 
WROC-Tv 
Rochester, N.Y 




AE LOVES CB 

EVEN MORE THAN OLIVES OR LEMON TWISTS 

This AE may not know all he could about 
bridge, but he knows about bridge players . . . 
About their fantastic loyalty to the game . . . 
and to the show they refer to as "our show" — 
Championship Bridge. 10,000,000 bridge play- 
ers watch the show. They write thousands of 
letters of thanks to stations carrying "their" 
show. Their profile looks like many others 
except for a bulge from fatter billfolds. And 
they watch with unheard of interest. Avid. 
Our AE's client likes this interest. So does his 
comptroller. So does our AE who sold them 
the show. He likes being a hero. 
For a completely one-sided story, write or wire 
Walter Schwimmer, Inc.. 75 East Wacker 
Drive, Chicago, Illinois. 

Championship Bridge 



"Championship Bridge with Charles Goren' 

ABC-TV Sunday. October 16. Minute announcements are 

available either on a 13/26 week or 26/26 week basis. 



<SOR 



AUGUST 1960 



BEST WAY TO EMBRACE THE NEW YORK 
NEGRO COMMUNITY... 




When it comes to reaching the enor- 
mous Negro Community of greater New 
York, time buyers sum up their strat- 
egy in three little words: "LIB IT UP" 
The reasons are simple. Whether you 
sell a LIBation or appeal to the LIBido 
only WLIB can do 
the effective job. 



mc ciicmve juu. -i 



Hotel Theresa. 125th Street & 7th Avenue, New York 27, N. Y. 

EMBRACES THE ENTIRE 
NEGRO MARKET IN GREATER NEW YORK 




INTRODUCING THE NEW 

DIUMW 

HOTEL 

39th St., East of Lexington Ave. 

NEW YORK 

Salon-size rooms • Terraces • New 
appointments, newly decorated • 
New 21" color TV • FM radio • New 
controlled air conditioning • New 
extension phones in bathroom • New 
private cocktail bar • Choice East 
Side, midtown area • A new concept 
of service. Prompt, pleasant, un- 
obtrusive. 



Robert Sarason, General Manager 
ORegon 9-3900 



I 



National and regional 6uj) 
in work now or recently complete^ 



SPOT BUYS 






RADIO BUYS 

Chesebrough- Pond's, Inc., New York: Campaign to reach tee 
agers begins this month in about 80 markets. Schedule is in tin 
four-week flights, minutes in the top 4 to 6 p.m. d.j. shows. Bu 
Alan Silverman. Agency: Norman Craig & Kummel, Inc.. New Y o] 

Advisory Board For Promotion Of Fresh California Bartle 
Pears, Sacramento: Its pear promotion begins 4 August in scatter 
top markets. Day minutes are being scheduled for five weeks. Ageiu 
Cunningham & Walsh. San Francisco. 



Bulova Watch Co., Inc., Flushing. N. Y.: Fall-Christmas campa* 
for Bulova watches will begin around mid-September. Traffic I.C 
for 13 weeks will be bought. 50 to 100 per week per market. Bu 
Phil Stumbo. Agency: McCann-Erickson. New York. 



TV BUYS 



Continental Baking Co., 

for Hostess products. 



Rye. N. Y.: Planning its fail 
in about 25 markets. Bulk of sche 
1 be in women's and kid s shows starting early September. 
Art Goldstein. Agency : Ted Bates & Co.. New York. 

American Tobacco Co., New York: Buying 52-week schedule^ 
Dual Filter Tareyton in 45-50 markets. Prime and fringe mint 
and 20 s are being used. Buver: Johnnie Murphy. Agency: Lawrej 
C. Gumbinner Adv. Agency. New York. 

American Chicle Co., Long Island City. N. Y.: Schedules st. 
August and run through September on Rolaids. Placements ar-; 
night minutes in about 15 markets. Buyers: Paul Reardon anri 
La Marca. Agency: Ted Bates & Co.. New York. 

Whitehall Laboratories, Div. of American Home Products, 

York: About 20 markets are getting Anacin schedules. Campais 
for 52 weeks using night minutes. Buyer: Jim Curran. . : 
Bates & Co., New York. 

International Latex Corp., New York: Planning the fall camp 
in 75-100 markets for Playtex girdles. Day and night minute 
ules will start in September for 13 weeks. Buyer: Greg Sulli 
Agency: Ted Bates & Co.. New York. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York: New activity on Fab begin 
August in about 50 markets. Prime I.D.'s and some minut- 
being scheduled for 13 weeks. Buyer: Russ Barry. Agenq 
Bates & Co., New York. 

Corn Products Refining Co., New York: Schedules of da> 
night minutes start at various times through August for Bosco 
range from six to 13 weeks, depending on market. Buye: 
Kaufman. Agency: Donahue & Coe, New York. 

SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 



I 



WBT... FIRST AS ALWAYS, IN PULSE 



Per cent 
GREATER 



WBT averaged 57 per cent greater share of audi- 
ence than its nearest competitor in the Monday to 
Friday ratings. Proof once again that WBT, serving 
the nation's 24th radio market, is the voice of 
authority in the Piedmont Carolinas. 



First every Monday 
to Friday period 
in the Prime 
25-county 
Charlotte 
Marketing 
Area 



*The January, I960 Pulse 



'NSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



Jefferson Standard 
Broadcasting Company 




50.000 v 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 



IN BOBSLEDDING 

A four man team headed by Captain Fiske 

is the 

PACESETTER 

It covered 5 miles in 3 minutes, 20.5 seconds 




IS CINCINNATI'S 

PACESETTER 

RADIO STATION 

Northwest Orient Airlines used only 
WSAI in Cincinnati to promote a Hawaiian 
tour. Says Donald Kimel, Area Sales 
Representative for Northwest: "This is 
the most successful radio tour ever gener- 
ated from the area. I think it is sig- 
nificant that your station was able to 
generate over $20,000 worth of busi- 
ness for us with just two one-minute 
spots a day for two months in the Jack 
Reynolds show. No other advertising 
media were used on this tour." In Pro- 
motion ... in Productivity . . . WSAI is 
The PACESETTER Station in Cincinnati. 

Represented Nationally by gill-perna New York, Chicago. Los Angeles. San Francisco. Boston. Detroit. Atlanta 
THE CONSOLIDATED SUN RAY STATIONS WSAI - Cincinnati; WPEN - Philadelphia; WALT - Tampa 



SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 19 



^ SPONSOR 

1 AUGUST 1960 




THEIR TV TAB: $8 MILLION 



he Democratic and Republican parties will spend an estimated $8 
lillion on television this Election year, even if Congress approves the 
enate bill seeking equal time free for the major party candidates 



10 matter which candidates lose in 
s Election year, tv and radio are 
und to win. They're headed for a 
litical sales bonanza which may 

11 reach an astronomical $10 mil- 
n for national network and spot as 
11 as local time. And tv, of course, 
11 come out an even bigger winner 
in radio, as its share is estimated 
j experts to be about 90% of all air 
;llars slated for 1960. 



The air budgets of both parties are 
undetermined — and probably won't 
really be known until long after the 
campaigns are over. This happens be- 
cause much of the money is donated 
by the citizenry and comes in on a 
week-to-week basis. But much of the 
uncertainty is occasioned this year by 
the fact that candidates may not be 
able to take advantage of the network 
and station offers of free time. The 



less free time available, of course, the 
more money will move into broadcast 
coffers for paid time. 

Either two or three weeks from to- 
day — on 15 or 22 August — the House 
of Representatives is expected to call 
up a Senate-approved resolution 
which will have profound immediate 
as well as long-term effects on the 
use of tv by political candidates. 

This bill — Senate Joint Resolution 



J3NSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



29 



207 — would suspend for this political 
jreai "til\ the "'equal time" for oppos- 
ing candidates passed as an amend- 
ment to the Communications Act by 
Congress last year. If the bill is ap- 
proved by both houses, candidates of 
both major political parties — Repub- 
lican and Democratic — will be able 
to dominate some 19 full hours of air 
time which have been offered by the 
three networks. 

But if the bill does not pass, ''they 
won't get a nickels worth of time," 
one veteran broadcaster commented 
last week. The amendment as passed 
last \ear provides that all candidates 
for the same office must be given 
equal air time, apart from interview 
and news programs. And the ruling 
applies to such splinter parties i there 
were 15 in the last Presidential Elec- 
tion \eari as the Greenbacks and the 
Vegetarians as well as to all national- 
state and local l county and city I po- 
litical contests. 

If the waiver is granted for this 
Election vear. major party Presiden- 
tial and Vice-Presidential candidates 
will be offered eight hours each from 
CBS TV and \BC TV and three 
hours from ABC TV — a total of 19 



hours roughly estimated to be worth 
almost 82 million. 

The S2 million figure gains added 
significance in light of the S3 million 
limitation imposed on each of the two 
national political committees by the 
Election laws. If the resolution passes, 
politicos and broadcast people will 
end up after the campaign with what 
they both want — free time plus siz- 
able chunks of paid-for time. If the 
bill does not pass, they'll get half of 
what they want — the television time 
which is paid for. 

Whatever happens, tv will be the 
lodestar for every candidate. And this 
Election year the Presidential cam- 
paign promises to be more dramatic, 
informative and controversial be- 
cause of tv lessons learned and tv 
tactics devised. 

Here's a summary of what you can 
expect from both the GOP and the 
Democrats, and from their major 
candidates in particular: 

• Modern electronic debates, with 
candidates talking a consistent policy 
line on major issues because of na- 
tionwide coverage rather than shift- 
ing stances between Birmingham, 
Ala., and Birmingham, Mich. 



• Tighter writing, more pinpoinl 
ed thinking, less declamation an 
oratory and more person-to-perst 
public speaking. 

• More scrupulous selectk 
program and announcement time s 
well as content, with a Septemb* 
start building up to a pre-8 Mo 
(Election) peak. 

• Fast-moving candidates, accor 
panied by video recorders and fill 
cameras, with speedy schedule shu 
fling as crucial issues arise. 

• More short program period 
probably the five-minute variety fd 
lowing a taped or live show wlii< 
can be readily cut to accommoda 
the political addition, and a moj 
realistic judgment as to the popula 
appeal shows, which should not \ 
pre-empted and which tend to bri 
on public resentment. 

• Intensified use of spot announcj 
ments for frequency and exposuii 
despite much criticism of the ''fa 1 
slogan" or "toothpaste" technique 
selling which played an important * 
role in the '56 Republican campais 
and — more recently — in Kennedy 
West Virginia primary drive. 

There'll be more audience prom 



CANDIDATES SEEK TO MATCH THEIR OWN TALENT 




MOBILITY: Giant crane hoisted SBC TV camera aloft at Democratic Convention. AUTHORITY: John Dal. 

Candidates themselies will be more mobile than in any previous campaign. One reason: v.p., and commentator Quincy 

Flexibility oj video tape, which trees them from fixed appearances, allows for changes thority to tv screen which 



SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST :91 



>i» in an effort to build tune-in to 
ndidate appearances, intensified re- 
arch into political themes and is- 
es which will be planks in the copy 
■forms, a striking rise in the num- 
r of news and interview shows be- 
use they are exempted from offer- 
i equal time to opposing candidates 
all parties. 

Even after getting millions of dol- 
s worth of free time, the national 
■mmittees are expected to spend at 
ist as much as they did in the 1956 
esidential election year. 
This sum, estimates William 
'dges. XBC TV's v.p. in charge of 
political unit, was $7 million — $4 
llion for the Republicans and $3 mil- 
n for the Democrats. He estimates 
.9 was for radio and $5.1 million 
r television, covering both network 
d spot purchases. The committees 
?mselves reported after the last elec- 
n these ratios in their over-all budg- 
I — for the Democrats, 75% of the 
al advertising appropriation went 
H tv and radio (62%, tv; 13%, ra- 
j i . with paid advertising account- 
's for 37% of their total operating 
dget: for the Republicans, 70% of 
e ad money went to air time (tv, 



AD PROS ON OPPOSING TEAMS 




GOP: Carroll Newton 



Democrats: J. L. Reinsch 



BOTH Republicans and Democrats are amassing staffs of pros in 
broadcast and advertising. Heading up GOP crew is BBDO v.p. Carroll 
Newton, loaned to the new Campaign Assoc, agency. Leonard Reinsch, 
tv/ radio director for Democrats, is long-time air media specialist 



THREE MAJOR PLUSES OF TV 




'ONTANEITY: Viewers like to 'peep' at ad-lib. unrehearsed action, evidenced 
te for CBS TV cameras by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. This year more than ever major 
t'didates will try to appear natural, avoiding such labels as 'canned, rigged, phony' 



54' ; : radio, 16% ) and 37% of the 
total budget to advertising. 

The public, said one network ex- 
ecutive, "will reap its richest political 
reward yet. Because this year both 
candidates are young, attractive and 
articulate. They're experts in com- 
munications of all kinds, and particu- 
larly sensitive to the miracles which 
tv can perform for them in the way 
of reaching people emotionally and 
stirring them to decision." I For re- 
lated comment, see "Commercial 
Commentary," page 12.) 

These men as well as the advertis- 
ing professionals around them — and 
both Kennedy and Nixon have been 
choosing them judiciouslv and im- 
aginatively — know well how to take 
maximum advantage of television's 
unique reach. So say the network 
people working with them. 

The Kennedy camp's broadcast ef- 
forts are centered in the hands of a 
respected pro, J. Leonard Reinsch, 
managing director of the Cox stations 
in Atlanta, who has been active in 
Democratic Conventions and broad- 



[ijONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



casl usage Bince 1944. He will work 
closely from Washington headquar- 
ter- with the new chairman of the 
Democratic National Committee. Sen. 
Henrv l Scoop I Jackson of Washing- 
ton, and with the advertising agency 
of record. Guild. Bascom & Bonfigli. 
San Francisco. There the details of 
the campaign air schedule are being 
shaped — and carefully guarded — by 
Miss Reggie Schuebel. v. p. for net- 
work relations. 

The Nixon contingent has tacitly 
approved formation of a temporary 
ad agencv in New York called Cam- 
paign Associates, with agency execu- I 
tives starling the company on loan 
from their own shops. Operating 
manager is Carroll Newton. BBDO 
v.p. who was active in the last Eisen- 
hower campaign, and Ted Rogers, 
who has been associated with Mr. j 
Nixon for many years. They will j 
work with L. Richard Guylay, former j 
newsman who now heads the Repub- 
lican Committees public relations di- 
vision and who held the same post in 
the '56 campaign. 

New ton agrees with his Democratic 
counterparts on one point: he won't 
discuss campaign advertising strat- 
egj or what they're planning for tv. 
But he does think the tv tape record- 
ings will be "extremely important" in 
this campaign because one of the 
"toughest things to do is to lock a 
candidate into a specific appearance 
at a particular moment of time." 
Tape, he says, allows for freedom of 
operation. It's to be assumed that 
tape will be used to fill some of the 
10 full hours which are understood 
to have been reserved by the Repub- 
lican part} 

He thinks "too much material tele- 
casl in the past has not been written 
with a full understanding of the tv 
medium. Speeches have been written 
as thoughtful dissertations on issues 
and subjects, and tv has been misused 
b) almost all candidates of both par- 
tie-."' 

Mi. \ewton suspects that most tv 
campaigning is directed to "the peo- 
ple who think -election of a candidate 
should be an intellectual and thought- 
ful process," but that even though 
thi- i- a fairK small percentage of all 
voters it's necessary to use a mass 
medium like t\ to reach the \ast cross 
i Please turn to page 52 1 



PART I OF A TWO-PART SERIES: 



$1 PER SHOWING FOR FILMS 




Telemeter coinbox shown above collects from $1 for feature 
films down to 25? for children's shows from home owners in 
Toronto suburb, where pay tv has close to 6.000 installations 



PAY TV LOOKS GOOD 
IN CANADIAN TEST 



Because of strong U.S. interest in pay tv ne are reprint- 
ing here the first of a tuo-part special article from the 
last issue of our sister magazine, CAISADIAJS SPOMSOR. 



I TORONTO, ONT. 

n the average Canadian household, 
free commercial television is watched 
36 hours a week. All television eco- 
nomics reflect this fact. It is one 
reason why tv has become this na- 
tion's top advertising medium. 

But in the Toronto suburb of 
Etobicoke, an experiment in Tele- 
meter pay tv is threatening to knock 
commercial tv viewing for a loop. 
The evidence so far, although still 
somewhat vague, indicates that Tele- 
meter will become a potent entertain- 
ment force which tv will have to meet. 



Sometime next month the ha 
working Telemeter engineers will 
stall the 6.000th electronic coinl 
on a tv set in the Etobicoke ar 
Thus, with half of the 12.000 kon 
w ithin reach of the coaxial cables pi 
vided with Telemeter service, the f 
scale field test can begin. 

Of necessity it will be a long t 
extending well into next vear so t 
the impact of Toronto's new CF' : 
TV and many other socio-econo r 
factors can be measured with reL 
bility. The resulting answers will 
onlv be vital to Telemeter's futi 



SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST l'> \ 



utmost interest to potential fran- 
lise holders around the world, but 
extreme importance to tv broad- 
sters as well. 

Even now, however, Telemeter ex- 
utives Gene Fitzgibbons and Bill 
ampton have a pretty good hunch 
ey have harnessed a giant, despite 
iy tv's history of three resounding 
ilures in the U.S. (at Chicago, 
dm Springs, and Bartlesville I . A 
w guides to what commercial tv 
11 be up against in the years to 
jime are available now. They de- 
and attention. 

Through the magic of its electronic 
■inboxes, Telemeter executives know 
actlv which households paid to see 
film on any given night, but they 
refully shield many of their statis- 
ts from close scrutiny. It is known 
at Telemeter's biggest "box-office" 
t so far was "Ten Commandments," 
e only film it has "held over" for 
full week's run. It did 50% busi- 



ness. In other words, half of the 
subscribers at some time during the 
week each paid SI to see it. 

This is not exactly a recent film, 
as Telemeter subscribers now under- 
stand the term, but it is considered 
one of those perennial favorites that 
can be counted upon to do well any- 
where. Therefore, it is not indicative 
of Telemeter films generally. Instead 
it showed what a big film can do. 

A much newer and more represent- 
ative film, "Sink the Bismark," shown 
on Telemeter simultaneouslv with its 
second run in theatres, piled up a 
big box-office score in only three 
nights: 43%. 

So far the poorest Telemeter re- 
turn has been with "Peyton Place," 
shown after it had completed theatri- 
cal runs. It did 22% business. The 
fact that this film's Telemeter appear- 
ance came after it had finished at 
central and neighborhood theatres 
does not seem significant. Other films 



in the same position showed up much 
better: "Ask any girl" did 37% busi- 
ness, "North by Northwest" did 36% 
business, and "The Mating Game" 
drew a 33% response. 

Here are a few more film ratings 
for comparison : "Anatomy of A Mur- 
der" with 23%, "Cash McCall" also 
with 23%, "FBI Story" with 25%, 
and "Gigi" with 30%. 

Taken individually, these perform- 
ance percentages are only mildly im- 
pressive. Certainly they make theatri- 
cal film people rub their hands in 
glee because they've lived with the 
rule-of-thumb that any production 
which gets 5% of the potential North 
American audience will be a colossal 
money-maker. But what does this 
Telemeter performance do to com- 
mercial tv? 

From a quick glance at this sam- 
pling of films and their ratings, it 
might be concluded that roughly one- 
i Please turn to page 48) 



VERAGE family of four is spending $10 to $17 per month to see 
Idren pushed the total to $22.) The popularity of pay tv has cause 
ell over $50 have been collected from some boxes, despite the 



Toronto test. (One worried father discovered his 
^e coinbox pickup cycle from 60 days to six weeks, 
that they would hold a maximum of only $48 





HOW SEX APPEAL SELLS GAS 

* Flying A's 'man with drive' theme, which hiked 1959 sales 6.3%, is now aire 
on 43 tv stations in 19 eastern markets; scene shifts to spot radio for the summ 

HFIen buy the gas, directly or I 
directly. Housewives may drive I 
family car in to gas it up, but bi el 
selection usually comes from the ill 
of the house. 

Tidewater Oil's eastern divi^l 
bases its advertising for Flying! 
gasoline on this premise. It buB 
male appeal by equating automo* 
power derived from Flying A vfl 
power over the ladies. Tv spot i ~ le 
main medium employed to proM 
this image, primarily because ofjE 
ability to show a robust "man ^T 
drive" in action, buying Flying A j 
driving off in his convertible, 
tionate female model at his 
"This approach is in the traditioi 
Marlboro cigarettes and Hathaj 
shirts," observes Tidewater 
sales manager Donald Y. McCo 
The "man with drive" cam 
got underway in 1959. That 
Flying A sales were up 6.3%, < 
pared to an industry-wide average 
crease of 4.1%. Consequenth 
theme was carried over to this ; 
with a larger budget and certaii 
visions in media strategy. And 
all indications, the upward swin 
sales continues in 1960. 

This year, as last, the camp 
was launched in April when the li 
motoring season begins. The tv sc 
ule encompassed 43 stations 
major markets throughout the IN 
east and middle-Atlantic states, 
spot frequency up considerably 
'59. There was a week of spot 
support at the beginning, in cor 
to a three-week "blitz" last 
Tidewater having decided to 
hold its major radio effort until 
mer. 

Newspapers, used the year b 
to help establish the new copy trl 
were eliminated from the new [ 
paign. Outdoor advertising's j 
was enlarged to the point wherej 
billboards are currently in u?< 
every two employed last year, prl 
ing extra thrust to the man with | 



GUY BUYS GAS, GETS GIRL is a theme of Tidewater 
Oil's spot tv campaign. Commercials, slanted to the male population, 
show robust Flying A customer hitting it off well with the opposite sex 



LOVE THAT FACTORY, TOO. A second theme devel- 
oped in Flying A's commercials, radio as well as tv, is quality and 
power produced by its new refinery, "the most advanced in the world" 




1 august 9 



,ienie. And. an additional boost 
[jmes from full-page, black-and-white 
agazine ads. 

He chose spot tv instead of an 
pcasional network plunge because we 
ave an effective copy point and, 
MBng within our budget, want to 
?t it across with frequency," ex- 
lain> \. R. Senftleben, sales promo- 
nn supervisor at eastern Tidewater. 
\nd for the same reason, we buy 
)ots on more than one station in 
'\eral major markets rather than in- 
st in a film series that would limit 
5 to one outlet." 

The Flying A tv spots, tailored to 
3- 30- 20- and 10-second availabilities, 
in through 3 July. Nearly all were 
ired in the evening, adjacent to 
igh-rated, prime time programs 
herever possible. In addition there 
as some late evening exposure to 
:ap the benefits of an almost-all-adult 
udience. "We don't mind a bit if 
omen see our commercials also," 
dds Senftleben, "since to our great 
jrprise, we've found that many of 
lem are attracted by the handsome 
lales and are convinced the spots are 
irected at them." 

Stations in the Flving A lineup in- 
iu.le: WMAL-TV, WRC-TV. and 
vTOP-TV. all Washington: WABI- 
V and WLBZ-TV. both Bangor. Me. : 
i'CSH-TV. WGAN-TV. and WMTW- 
X all Portland, Me.; WBAL-TV. 
HZ-TV. and WMAR-TV. all Balti- 
m\ WBZ-TV, WHDH-TV. and 
JliAC-TV, all Boston: WASTlTV), 
dhanv: WRGB-TV and WTEN-TV, 
•oth Schenectady; WINR-TV and 
TOF-TV. Binghamton. X. Y.; 
I ABC-TV. WCBS-TV. WOR-TV, and 
fNBC-TV, all New York. 

Rounding out the list: WHEC-TV 
;nd WVET-TV. both Rochester; 
VHEX-TV and WSYR-TY. both 
'Syracuse ; WGAL-TV. Lancaster. Pa.; 
VLYH-TV. Lebanon. Pa.: WCAU- 

V. WFIL-TV, and WRCV-TV. all 
'hiladelphia: WBRE-TV and WNEP- 
Y. both Wilkes-Barre, Pa.: WJAR- 
;Y and WPRO-TV. both Providence; 
VRVA-TV. WTVR-TV, and WXEX- 
fV. all Richmond; WNHC-TV. 
I'VTIC-TV. and WHNB-TV, all Hart- 

ord. 

J Though the regular tv schedule 
j-nded 3 July, there was some tv this 
tammer because the political Conven- 
tions fit so well into Tidewater's pre- 



ferred audience pattern. Over WCBS- 
TV, New York, Flying A 10-second 
spots were run at all station breaks 
during the Convention coverage, and 
the same arrangement prevails Elec- 
tion night. 

Basically, however, under the new 
media strategy w-orked out by Tide- 
water and agency Foote, Cone & Beld- 
ing, Los Angeles, the big play goes 
to spot radio for the summer months. 
"Radio is second only to tv in drama- 
tizing the man with drive," says Sen- 
ftleben. "And in summer, via its out- 
door reach, radio carries us to the all- 
important motorist while in his car 
and after he reaches his destination, 
such as the beach." 

The main thrust of Tidewater's 
spot radio drive this summer brings 
in 23 markets, 62 stations. It goes 
after the male audience with early 
morning, lunch-time, early evening, 
and weekend exposure. Scheduled to 
run through Labor Day, it utilizes all 
spot lengths and favors sports adja- 
cencies. 

The oil company is also carrying 
off an auxiliary spot radio campaign 
in 30 markets, most of which are out 
of range of the main flight. This is 
known as "Melody Mileage," a con- 
test based on speedometer mileage of 
listeners' automobiles. It's a 26-week 
promotion which began early last 
May. 

Each station carrying "Melody 
Mileage" broadcasts a "lucky" four- 
digit number from 10 to 15 times per 
day. If the number is the same as 
the last four digits of the mileage on 
a listener's speedometer, he is to pro- 
ceed to the nearest Flying A station 
within a half hour of the broadcast. 
There he fills out an application 
which the dealer mails to the radio 
station over which the number was 
heard. 

If the number jibes, allowing five 
additional miles for driving to a Fly- 
ing A station, and the time of arrival 
at the station is within a halfhour of 
broadcast, the station mails the lis- 
tener a certificate for 10 gallons of 
FKing A gas (and a Flying A credit 
card application!. Under this sys- 
tem, the winner is required to make 
two trips to a Flying A station, which 
could be the beginning of a trend on 
his part. "Melody Mileage" is owned 
by Creative Productions Inc. of Cali- 




MARKETING considerations are of utmost 
import in Flying A advertising approach. The 
Tidewater Oil Co.'s marketing head, J. Ronald 
Getty, checks all commercials prior to their use 



fornia, from which Tidewater pur- 
chased the eastern rights. 

At Tidewater anecdotes are flying 
thick and fast regarding the impact 
of Melody Mileage in various com- 
munities. There's a report that one 
man. in the process of getting a 
shave, heard the lucky number via 
the barber shop radio, reached into 
his pocket for the slip of paper on 
which he had recorded his latest mile- 
age, saw that he was a winner, and 
dashed, lather and all, to the nearest 
Flying A station. 

According to another story, a ladv 
heard her number come up while 
bathing, and she sailed off to the 
Flying A station clad in a bathrobe. 
And there's the grocer who keeps a 
radio going for his customers' con- 
venience and is wondering about the 
wisdom of this policy. Whenever the 
"Melody Mileage"" number is read on 
the air his clientele scatter in all di- 
rections to check their cars, leaving 
the store deserted. 

Tidewater's tv commercials are 

composed of two basic themes: sex 

and quality. The former emanates 

[Please turn to page 69) 



august 1960 



35 




TELEVISION Bureau of Ad 
Armsby (left), director < 



|'s presentation — A Network of Facts About Daytime T< 
s promotion and presentations, and Bob Levenstein, sales presentatio 



TvB digs up new data on daytime t\ 



* With wide variety of possible buys, network daytime 
tv has become both a 'mass' and a 'selective' ad medium 

^ TvB presentation shows cost-per- 1,000, programing 
costs down, cost efficiency, audiences, and advertisers up 



Uaytime network television, hope- 
fully putting the "transition" years 
behind, last week offered itself to ad- 
vertisers as a "giant medium, mass 
and selective, to move more of what 
you manufacture, to more people at 
less cost." 

"A Network of Facts About Day- 
time Television," published by the 
Television Bureau of Advertising, 
stresses a reduced cost-per- 1,000 cou- 
pled with an increase in home impres- 
sions-per-dollar, and should provide 
further ammunition to attract clients 
into the medium now who will be 



willing to pay higher cost when the 
merits of the medium have been 
proven. (See "Will 'Rock Bottom' 
Costs Spur Daytime Network Tv?" 
sponsor. 4 July, i 

The report points out that daytime 
network tv is no junior medium, but 
is "big business." with advertisers in- 
vesting $171,243,799—27.3% of total 
network investment — in 1959 week- 
day daytime network gross time. 
This is $25 million more than in 1958 
and $65 million more than in 1955. 
an increase of 61.5% in five years. 
TvB also states that 57.8% of ail net- 



work commercial minutes were wei 
day daytime in 1959. 

The 1960 cost-per-1,000 is n< 
about $1.36, or 735 home impr< 
sions-per-dollar. Last year, buyers a 
only 549 impressions-per-dollar, o 
$1.82 cost-per-1,000. TvB claims tr 
network weekday video, with its 25 
reduction in cost-per-1,000, has 
creased in cost efficiency "at a ti 
when all basic sources show ott 
media costing much more for li 
more." 

"Only the facts are new, the val 
remain the same," declared 
Armsby, TvB director of sales p 
motion and presentations. "Dayti 
television was a good buy in 1 ( 
and in 1958 when we put out this 
ports predecessor, but new facts sh 
it to be an even better investmr 
Our job in assembling the latest 
formation is to show the new rec< 
nition the medium has received fri 



SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST IS 



livertisers and to get it even broader 
Htcognition. 

I "The facts are available," he said. 

■jpur job is to make them as dra- 

Hiatic and pertinent as possible — and 

Handy to advertisers, networks and 

Hj^encies. We've endeavored to show 

jfjie prospective client that television 

JP not only a mass medium, but can 

so be a selective medium, depend- 

ig on what time he buys, what day, 

hether net or spot, what length of 

jmmercials, and so forth." 

If an advertiser wishes to sponsor 

r co-sponsor a program, he will find 

time programing bugaboos 

ave been largely exorcised, accord- 

ig to TvB's presentation, and a pat- 

rn of development has set in. The 

lesis: As more advertisers move into 

lytime network television, they 

ring with them the need for more 

different television programing. 

he increased quantity and variety of 

•ograming, in turn, attracts more 

id new viewers. 

Counting sponsored programs only, 
le number of network daytime week- 
quarter hours has gone from 49 
rery two weeks in 1956 to 73 every 
vo weeks this year, states TvB. Pro- 
raming fare has settled down to 
flfine major types: Quiz-audience par- 
cipation (32.5%), serial (27%), 
hildren (10.8%), situation comedy 
10.8%), drama (8.1%), and at 
.7' i interview, news, popular music 
nd western. The filmed shows are 
Imost exclusively reruns of nighttime 
iniii'Tograms. 

Another feature of the daytime buy 
ssed in the report is flexibility 
hich eliminates any long-term com- 
- litments. Networks offer line-up in- 
entives, choice of full, half or par- 
cipating sponsorship, and choice of 
sngth of the buy — days, weeks. 
lonths, quarters of the year, full 
ear. And the price is low. Advertis- 
rs get Class C and Class D time 
ates, saving one-half and two-thirds 
he cost of nighttime. 
What is the reach of a daytime 
uy? TvB says that 85.9% of all tv 
view daytime television ; 
view mornings, 83.1% view 
That's more than 27 mil- 
homes a.m., 36 million homes 
37 million homes for the whole 
ay. There are more homes watch- 



COST 


& 


REACH- 

Net Time 
Plus Talent' 


DAYTIME 

Cost-Per- 
1,000** 


NET TV 

Homes Reached*" 


1956 




$15,400 




$1.57 


3,254,000 


1957 




17,200 




1.59 


3,431,000 


1958 




19,600 




1.33 


3,914,000 


1959 




15.800 




1.82 


3,067,000 


1960 




16,300 




1.36 


3,489,000 


♦Nielsen, .Tan-F 
••Nielsen, Jan.- 

•"Nielsen. First 


-eb. e 

Fell. 


ch year, adult programing only 
ach year, all weekday daytime p 
Report, total audience, sponsored 


■scltil 


* carter-Hour —» 



ing daytime tv today, TvB points out, 
than there were total television homes 
in 1956. 

Carrying the figures further, 8,- 
!!.V ).()()() homes watch the average 
minute of daytime tv. In 1955, only 
5.642,000 watched the same minute. 
And the first quarter of 1960, TvB 
claims, is almost 7% ahead of the 
same period last year. Today, the 
total number of daytime home view- 
ing hours is 106,220.000 a day, and 
weekdays — between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. 
— tv delivers at least 19% of all U.S. 
tv homes. 

Other statistics on reach quoted in 
the presentation: 

• Average quarter-hour segment: 
1960—3.489.000 homes (1956—3,- 
254,000). 



• Average daytime network pro- 
gram: 1960—3,648,000 per telecast 
(12.2% more homes than the first 
quarter of 1959). 

• Average weekday quiz-audience 
participation strip, cumulative: 8.4% 
of U.S. homes per telecast; 19% in a 
week, 2.2 times each; 32.4% in a 
month, 5.2 times each. 

• Average daytime serial program, 
cumulative: 10.6% of U.S. tv homes 
per telecast; 18.2% in a week, 2.9 
times each; 28.6% in a month, 7.3 
times each. 

Who watches weekday daytime tele- 
vision? TvB lists 52%) of all the 
women in the nation as watching 
every day, regardless of whether they 
live in tv homes. Before 9 in the 
(Please turn to page 69) 



PARENT COMPANIES 


ADVERTISING 


ON NETWORK TV 






1959 


1958 


Number of Advertisers 


320 


269 


Number of Netv Advertisers 


59 


30 


(Percent of All Advertisers) 


(18.4%) 


(11.1%) 


Number of ISetv Advertisers Using 
Daytime 


32 


11 


(Percent of All New Advertisers) 


(54.2%) 


(36.7%) 









ISOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



37 



Change in Charms radio copy hikes- 



^ New soft-sell technique by Needham & Grohmann 
sets peak sales record for Charms in current campaign 

^ Candy company adds $50,000 to radio budget for 
schedules in New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Boston 



I he success of the current spot ra- 
dio advertising campaign which 
chalked up a new high in sales for 
the Charms Candy Co. in June, is 
credited to a swinging, toe-tapping 
tune, a lilting female voice, and satir- 
ical lyrics. 

"We broke all records for the 
month" claims John M. Keil, crea- 
tive director and vice president of 
Needham & Grohmann, the agency 
handling the Charms account. "I 
Want Some Charms," a singing com- 
mercial with a danceable pops tempo 
now extolling the taste appeal of the 



small package of confection to radio 
listeners in the New York City, Phila- 
delphia, Chicago, and Boston areas, 
represents a new concept in advertis- 
ing for Charms, says Keil. "It's ob- 
vious that people are sold on com- 
mercials that give them some measure 
of fun and entertainment," he adds. 

Keil bolsters his statement by point- 
ing to the strong sales stimulant of 
their earlier "Boomer" commercials 
— a series of taped one-minute fam- 
ily life comedy situations. 

According to the agency executive, 
the humorous soft-sell "Boomer" ra- 



dio advertising stint, which ran fro«F 
July 1959 through May of this yeaB* ' 
resulted in a solid 20 f v over-all salest' 
increase. For a five-cent candv itedr 
— one which had languished inertlyf 
for years in the shadow of til b 
"giant" in that category — LifesaveV ' 
— this was eyebrow-raising. Biggl*' 1 
things, however, are expected of tlfcjF 
new singing commercial. 

Prior to the amusement - gearewT 
sales pitch contrived by Needham IIP 
Grohmann. the Charms Candv CouT 
had spent its advertising dollars aw 
an assortment of musical jingle me*jP 
sages on radio stations in the samel 
markets without newsworthy conse-i * 
quence. When Needham & Grohmanni r 
acquired the account in June 1959,1 
also fell heir to contractual commit- 
ments wtih these radio stations — and 
to a jumbo-sized challenge. 

"We just had to come up with 
something different" exclaims Keil, 



I WANT SOME CHARMS,' the c 

:ontrived by Sascha Burland (left). 



ndy company's 
With him are 



I whose clever lyrics take good-natured but firm pokes at Lifesave 
Jan Crockett and Needham & Grohmann, president, H. Grohman 



►ales 20% 



j-trho admits that a considerable 
mount of creative head scratching 
^ent into the evolution of "Boomer'" 
nd his Charms boosting Mom and 
fop. 

"Boomer,'' a precocious lad of 10 
yr 11 (played by a bright young- 
,ter named Leland Mayfield) , and his 
ypically American parents (por- 
fayed by veteran actors Margaret 
)raper and Mason Adams) "sell'-' 
heir candy product subtly while en- 
ding capsule versions of life's little 
; omedies. The name "Charms" is 
leverly interspersed at strategic 
■oints during the tiny family-life dra- 
las without fanfare. 
. The popularity of this first "fun 
;eH" endeavor was soon evidenced as 
^harms salesmen everywhere found 
Jiemselves suddenly stripped of their 
rue identities and greeted, collec- 
tively as well as individually, by their 
justomers as "Hi, Boomer!" 

The Charms song commercial (la- 
beled by the admen as "the second 
,hase in the fun ads") is the brain 
wild of Sascha Burland, a musically 
|riented writer, singer, and producer, 
;cured by Needham & Grohmann for 
lis specific work. Burland, the cre- 
of an outstanding list of com- 
lercial jingles, tailored the Charms 
isical beat to permit deliberate and 
lear enunciation of the product 
ame. while the lyrics were fashioned 
take gentle but obvious pokes at 
leir top competitor — Lifesavers. 
Backed up by nine years' experi- 
ice in creating radio and television 
ngles as well as program themes, the 
rsatile Sascha announced, recently, 
te formation of C/Hear Services. 
ic. In their New York City studios 
ie company will create and produce 
Ivertising for clients in radio and 

The charmer (if you'll pardon the 
tin) doing the vocal is Jan Crock- 
t, an attractive miss with a fresh 
>ung singing style. The newcomer 

the singing commercial field is a 
cent Miss America Pageant finalist, 
gainst a Nelson Riddle type arrange- 
ent. the little candy is getting a 
business style "sell." 
I Please turn to page 69) 




STORE STRATEGY is explained and demonstrated by Globe's v.p. William 

WEJL's Bill Pierce (c), promotion-publicity director and d.j.; and Cecil Woodland, gen. mgr. 

ONLY RADIO REACHES THE 
GRASS ROOTS, SAYS GLOBE 



Wh 



' hen the Globe Department Store 
of Scranton, Pa., recently came in for 
a $2 million expansion program call- 
ing for a greater advertising budget, 
it turned, naturally, to radio. 

Naturally, because having used ra- 
dio, specifically and exclusively sta- 
tion WEJL, for the past 10 years, 
Globe knew it was the only medium 
that could draw new business from 
outlving areas. The onlv question to 
be settled: What type of schedule 
would best carry out their new goal? 

Up until three months ago, Globe's 
advertising on WEJL had consisted 
of two participations in the Bill 
Pierce Morning Show (Mon.-Fri.), 
sponsorship of the Mon.-Sat. (9-10 
a.m.) Globe Store Showcase, a music 
and news program, and the 10-minute 
Athlete of the Week show, scheduled 
on Sundays, 1:30 p.m. and running 
33 weeks out of the year. Purchase 
of even five-minute newscast on Sun- 
day i total of eight scattered through 
morning and afternoon) completed 
the heavy-on-radio ad picture. 

All of the above — with the excep- 
tion of Athlete of the Week, which 
promoted men's furnishings and two 
segments of the Globe Store Show- 
case, one devoted to the appliance 
department and the other to the store 
restaurant — stressed the Globe in gen- 



eral: reminder of store hours, conve- 
nience of parking, shopping and din- 
ing under one roof, etc. 

The new schedule, however, re- 
quired a different approach, Globe 
ad executives felt. One that would 
not only stress the convenience of 
shopping at the store, but would give 
that extra incentive necessary to pull 
shoppers from distant areas. 

Their solution: a saturation sched- 
ule of 30-second announcements — all 
on WEJL, since Globe's policy is to 
dominate any medium it uses — each 
promoting one department which was 
carrying a special sale or feature. 

At the start of the schedule most 
of the spots promoted the basement 
shoe department. But when recently a 
total of a hundred 30"s in just three 
days pulled outstanding results. Globe 
decided to give its other departments 
more extensive coverage. 

Over-all success of Globe's radio 
advertising is attested to by this com- 
ment from store v.p. \^ illiam W . Da- 
vis: "Radio is given a very specific 
job to do in our merchandising pro- 
gram, and it's accomplishments of 
that job is certainly a big contribut- 
ing factor to the total volume we 
realize per \ear. a good deal more 
than any of the five other department 
stores in the vicinity." ^ 



WAVE STYLE BOOKS 
ASK FOR 'ENGLISH' 

^ 4 Re-introduction to public of English language 
in broadcasting' is aim of Louisville radio/tv outlets 

^ Style books for news and continuity writers outline 
rules and suggestions for clear and understandable copy 



#% return to clear, concise, under- 
standable English is the aim of two 
new style books just issued by WAVE. 
Louisville. 

Prepared for its radio and televi- 
sion news and continuity writers, the 
WAVE manuals were published in 
"an attempt to carry out what we feel 
is broadcasting's responsibility to set a 
good example in the correct use of 
English."* 

"We hope that other stations will 
join us.'" said James M. Caldwell, 
radio program director, "in our cam- 



paign to wield the meat axe on cliches 
in broadcasting, and try to re-intro- 
duce to the public the English lan- 
guage." 

The continuity style book, after 
setting down basic operating stand- 
ards, lists a series of "do's"" and 
"don't's" (see box) for writers to 
follow. The recommended WAVE ap- 
proach is to try to look at the prob- 
lem from the listener's viewpoint. 
"Write it the wav you would best 
understand it if you were the listener. 
Be simple, sincere, specific, informa- 





DO'S AND DONT'S FOR CONTINUITY 




Write the way you talk 


Don't use unneeded words 




Put action in your verbs 


Don't overwrite 




Use terms your listeners can 

visualize 


Don't affect an overly breezy 
manner or style 




Write with nouns instead of 
pronouns 


Don t explain too much 




Make >ure the listener knows 
who is speaking 


Don't use awkward adverbs 




Avoid cliches 


Don't use dialect unless your 
ear. and announcer's, is good 




Prefer the standard rather than 
the off-beat 


Don't inject opinion 




Handle humor with kid gloves 


Don't take short cuts at the ex- 
pense of clarity 



tive. enthusiastic, and believeable. 
and be sure you're understood." 

In its news writing style book, the 
Louisville outlet outlines 10 guides to 
a good broadcast news story — clarity, 
brevity, simple language, descriptivt 
wording, careful sentence structure, 
proper identification of names and 
titles, updated leads to old but usable 
stories, fairness, identification of 
sources, and proper handling of names 
and nicknames. Some of WAVE > 
suggestions to news writers: 

A news writer should pause befort 
going on to the next story and ask 
himself if the one he has just writtei 
is complete and clear to the listener. 
Does it answer all legitimate qua 
tions one might have? Could the 
listener re-tell the story from having 
heard it on the newscast? Generalb 
speaking, if a news story is clearh 
written, the other ingredients of good 
writing are automatically there. 

Not connected directly with style. 
but extremely important to all news- 
casts. WAVE reminds newswriters, is 
'"fairness." Fairness in reporting 
not only necessary, but demanded 
here. A charge by one person or part\ 
against another should be balanced 
with an answer from the accused. It 
no answer can be obtained, the writer 
should balance the story with an 
explanation that the accused parh 
was not available for comment, or 
declined comment." 

Continuity writers are urged to 
take time to think out points before 
thev write, organizing details to make 
the writing direct and concise. \^ A\ I 
also warns: Watch the "purple 
prose." be conversational but not flip 
pant, use only explanations that art 
essential. Also, don't use awkward 
adverbs — or. as Art Carney says. "At 
mv burial, please don't sav funeral 
wise." 

"Unlike the writer of printed 
matter." WAVE concludes, "the 
broadcast writer must remember that 
he is a ghost writer. That is. he is 
writing for one individual listenei 
through a middleman, the announcer. 
Therefore, he has to keep in mine 
not onlv the listener, making sure ht 
reaches him or her. but he also has 
to make sure that structurally and 
technically his copy and instructions 
are clear to the announcer and the 
engineer." 



SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



■ all tv planners can continue to re- 
y upon a solid sets-in-use picture. 

The high viewing level trend of the 
pst few years continues — with the 
public watching the screens three 
t iours more per week over last year, 
/ringing the total to almost 45 hours. 
, This is one highlight of Nielsen's 
innual study on cumulative audiences 



tv basics/aug. 

Tv sets-in-use level remains firm 



^ Nielsen's March Week I study shows the tv public 
viewing increasing over last year to 45 hours per week 



and usage patterns for tv viewing — 
part of its March Week I report. ( See 
chart below. I Other highlights: 

• More than 95% of all U.S. tv 
homes, or 43.211 million different 
households, use their tv sets during a 
typical week — compared with 95.6%, 
or 42.064 million homes using tv dur- 
ing the same week in 1959 and 



94.5%, or 40.163 million homes dur- 
ing the like week in 1958. 

• The average home views tv 44 
hours and 56 minutes a week, with 
the mornings accounting for 13% of 
all tv viewing hours, afternoons 29%, 
evenings 54%, and post-midnight 
4%. In 1959 the average home 
viewed tv 41 hours and 49 minutes 
per week; in 1958, 43 hours and 12 
minutes weekly. 

• More than half (23 million) of 
the tv homes use their tv sets after 
midnight. ^ 



Homes using tv, by day parts, during an average week ( 1959 vs. I960) 

WEEKLY CUMULATIVE TOTAL 



% of total 
viewing time 
1959 1960 



Avg. hrs. per home 
% tv homes No. (add 000) reached 

1959 1960 1959 1960 1959 1960 



Mon.-Fri. A.M. 


9 


10 


62.3 


66.5 


27,412 


30,058 


5.74 


6.27 


Mon.-Fri. P.M. 


19 


21 


83.1 


83.9 


36,564 


37,923 


9.38 


10.55 


Sunday A.M. 


1 


1 


24.2 


26.4 


10,648 


11,933 


1.29 


1.45 


Sunday P.M. 


4 


4 


62.5 


65.1 


27,500 


29,425 


2.49 


2.64 


Saturday A.M. 


2 


2 


42.6 


46.1 


18.744 


20,837 


2.06 


2.12 


Saturday P.M. 


4 


4 


57.2 


64.8 


25,168 


29,290 


2.45 


2.62 


All evenings 


57 


54 


95.5 


94.6 


42,020 


42,759 


24.00 


24.73 


12 Mid.-6 A.M. 


4 


4 


48.0 


51.3 


21,120 


23,188 


3.23 


3.43 



24 Hr. 7 Day Total 

Source: A C Nielsen, first ueek 



1. THIS MONTH IN NETWORK TV 

Specials scheduled during four weeks ending 28 Aug. 



PROGRAM (NETWORK)* 



COST SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 



[41-Star Football Game (A) 



lolly wood Sings (N) 



$185,000 



Standard Oil, D'Arcy; Car- 
ling Brewing, Lang, 
Fisher & Stashower; 
Revlon, Grey; R. J. Rey- 
nolds, Esty; 8/12 

Breck (V 2 ), Reach-McClin- 
ton 8/1 



PROGRAM (NETWORK)* 



COST SPONSOR, AGENCY, DATE 



Jazz Age (N) 

What Makes Sammy Run: 

Part I (N) 
What Makes Sammy Run: 

Part II (N) 
Esther Williams (N) 



Purex, E. H. Weiss, 8/5 
Purex, E. H. Weiss, 8/15 



Purex, E. H. Weiss, 8/22 



Brewers Foundation, J. 
Walter Thompson, 8/8 



Networks: (A) ABC TV; (C) CBS TV; 



JPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



2. NIGHTTIME 



C O 



P A 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 






FYI 


Meet The Pre* 

Manhattan Shirt 

(Daniel A 

Charlea) 

I L $6,500 


















Twentieth 

Prudential 

(B-McC) 

D-F $35,000 


Time Present 




D Edwards 

(Bates) 
N-L $9.500tt 






No net service 








D. Edwards 

(Bates) 
N-L $».500H 




News 
Texaco (CAW) 
N-L $«.500tt 


News 
Texaco (CAW) 
N-L $6.500tt 


Broken Arrow 


Lassie 

Campbell Soup 

(BBDO) 

A-F $37,000 


Overland Trail 
(7-») 

Warner-Lambert 

(Lambert A 

Feasley) 

W-F $34,500 

(hr.) 




No net service 
D Edwards 






No net service 






John Daly News 


News 
(repeat feed) 


John Daly News 


D Edwards 
(repeat feed) 


News 

(repeat feed) 


John 


Maverick 

(7:30-8:30) 
Kilter Co (TAB) 
Dnckett (TAB) 
W-F $78,000 


Dennis The 

Kellogg(Buniett) 

Best Foods 

(GB&B) 

Se-F $36,000 


Overland Trail 


Cheyenne 

(7:30-8:30) 

Balston (Gard.) 

Am. Chicle 

(Bates) 

Ritchie (KAE) 

W-F $81,500 


Charlie Farreli 
Show 

(Bates) 
ScF $18,000 


Riverboat 
(7:30-8:30) 
Del Monte 
(McCann-E.) 
A-F $72,090 


Bronco 

(alt wks 
7:30-8:30) 
Bra A Wmsn 
Chevrolet (C-E) 
DuPont (BBDO) 
W-F $82,000 


No net service 


(7:30-8:30) 
Philip Morris 

(Burnett) 
Colgate (Bates) 
W-F $65,000 


Mu 

Sum 

(7 


Maverick 


Ed Sullivan 

(8-9) 

Colgate (Bates) 
alt Kodak (JWT) 
V-L $85,800 


Music On Ice 

(8-9) 


Cheyenne 
Johnson A J 

(TAB) 
PAG (BAB) 


The Texan 
Brown A Wmsn 
(Bates) alt 
All State 
(Burnett) 
W-F $37,000 


Riverboat 


Sugarfoot 

(alt wks 
7:30-8:30) 
Carnation 
(EWRR) 
Polk Miller 
(Ayer) 
W-F $82,008 


Peck's Bad 
Cirl 


Del Monte 
(McCann-E.) 


Mui 
Sum 


Law Man 
B. J. Remoldi 
(Bsty) 
Whitehall 
(Bites) 
W-F $41,000 


Ed Sullivan 


Music On Ice 


Bourbon St. Beat 

(8:30-9:30) 

Bm A Wmsn 

(Bates) 

A-F $80,500 


Father Knows 

Best 

Lever (JWT) alt 

Scott (JWT) 
Sc-F $39,000 


Wells Fargo 

(SSC&B) alt 
P&G (BAB) 
W-F $47,000 


Wyatt Earp 

Gen Mills (DFS) 

alt PAG 

(Compton) 

Alberto Culver 

(Wade) 
W-F $40,000 


Dobie Ci His 

PUlsbury 
(Burnett) 

Philip Morris 

(Burnett) 

Sc-F $37,000 


Cas Co. Playhsc 

Amer. Gas Assn 

(LAN) 
Dr-F $14,000 

alt wks 
NBC Playhouse 


Oxz 

Qui 

Sc-P 


The Rebel 
LAM (DFS) 

PAG (TAB) 
W-F $41,500 


C. E. Theatre 

Gen Electric 

(BBDO) 

Dr-F $51,000 


The Chevy 

Mystery Show 

(9-10) 

Chevrolet 

(Cemp-E) 

V-L $60,000 


Bourbon St. Beat 

Reynolds Metal 
(LAN) 


Spike Jones 

Show 

Gc-» Foods 

(BAB) 

MuL $20,000 


Peter Cunn 
Bristol- Myers 
(DCSAS) alt 
R. J. Reynold! 

(Eaty) 
My-F 138.00< 


The Rifleman 

Miles Lab 
(Wade) 
PAG (BAB) 
Ralston 
(Gardner) 
W-F $38.00n 


Tightrope 
J. B. Williams 
Co. (Parkson) 
alt 
Am Tob (SSCB) 
My-F $39,000 


Richard 
Diamond 
P. Lorlllard 
(LAN) 
alt sust 


Hat 
<» 
Car 

My-1 


The Alaskans 

(9:30-10:30) 
LAM (Mc-E), 
Armour (FCB) 
Gen. Fd§ (BAB) 
Polk Miller 
(Ayer) 
A-F $77,50< 


Hitchcock 

Bristol-Myers 

(TAB) 

My-F $39,000 


The Chevy 
Mystery Show 


Adv. In Paradise 

(9:30-10:30) 
Reynolds Metals 

(LAN) 
Chevrolet (C-E) 
Armour (FCB) 
A-F $80,000 


Celebrity Talent 

Gen Foods 

(BAB) 

VL $32,000 


Alcoa-Coodyear 

Theater 
Alcoa (FSR) at 
Goodyear (TAR] 
Dr-F $39.00( 


Colt .45 
Chevrolet (C-E) 
Armour (FCAB) 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

BmAW (Bates) 

W-F $18,000 


Comedy Spot 

Pet Milk 

(Gardner) 

alt 

8. C. Johnson 

(NLAB) 

Sc-F $14,001 


Arthur Murray 
Sterling (DFS) 

Block (Grey) 
V-L $30.00 


Hat 


The Alaskans 
Chevrolet 


Connecticut 
Lever (JWT) 
Sc-F $12,000 


Loretta Young 
Tool (North) 

(Lam A Feasley) 
Dr-F $49,50( 


Adv. In Paradise 

Gen Fds. (BAB) 

LAM BAB] 


New Comedy 

Showcase 

Lorlllard (LAN) 

Gen Foods 

(TAB) 

Sc-F $18,000 


Purex Specials 
(10-11) 

Purex (Weiss) 
Dr-F $225.00i 
Hollywood Sine 

(8/1; 10-11) • 


Alcoa Presents 

Alcoa (FSB) 
Dr-F $35,000 


Diagnosis: 

Unknown 

(10-11) 

S. C. Johnson 

(NLAB) 

Polaroid (DDB) 

My-F $40.00( 


M Squad 
Am Tob (SSCB 
A-F $31,001 


Bren 
111 
8p I 


Johnny Staccati 
A-F $11.50 


What's My Line 

Kellogg 

(Burnett) 

Sunbeam 

(Perrln Paul) 

Q-L $31,000 


No net service 


Ted Mack & 
The Original 
Amateur Hour 
J. B. Williams 
Co. (Parkson) 
V-L $23,00< 


June Allvson 
DuPont (BBDO) 
Dr-F $44,000 


Purex Specials 
Esther William 

B 8 10 U * 


No Net Service 


Diagnosis 
Unknown 


No net service 


w 



ttCost is per segment. Prices do not include sustaining, participat- 
ing or co-op programs. Costs refer to average show costs including 
talent and production. They are cross (include 15% agency commisaion) 



e charges. This chart covers p 

Heated as follows: (A) Ad veil 

(An) Audience Participation. (C) Comedy, (D) Documentary, 



SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1961 





i 


G 


R 


A 


P 


H 


1 


1 AUG. - 


28 AUG. 




NESDAY 

NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 




















































D Edwards - 
Amer. Home 

(Batei) 
It Philip Morrli 

(Burnett) 
S-L $9.500tt 


D Edwards 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

alt Amer. Home 

(Bates) 
N-L $9.500tt 




ird« 

Bates) 
(DFS) 
'.500U 


Ncwi 

Texaco (C&W) 
4-L W.500tt 


INwaco (C&W) 
I-L $6,500tt 


Texaco (C&W) 
*-L $6,500tt 




irefco 






No net service 






No net service 


No net service 










Hrds 
M) 


News 

(repeat feed) 


ohn Daly News 


D Edwards 

Amer. Home lit 
Philip Morris 
(repeat feed) 


(repeat feed) 


John Daly News 


D Edwards 

Parliament 
alt Amer. Home 
(repeat feed) 


News 
(repeat feed) 




ing 

-:30) 
Cann) 
(18.000 


Wagon Train 

(7:80-8:30) 
Ford (JWT) 
rV-F $T8.000 


Steve Canyon 


Invisible Man 


Plainsman 

Amer. Tob. 

(SSCB) 
P&G (B&B) 
Midas Muffler 
, (Weiss) 
Sterling (DFS) 
W-T $30,000 


Walt Disney 

Presents 

(7:30- 840) 

Hill (Ayer) 

A-L I94.0OO 


Rawhide 

(7:30-8:30) 

Van Camp 

(EWRR) 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

Hamm (C-M) 

W-F $80,000 


Cimarron City 

(7:30-8:30) 


Dick Clark 

Show 
Beeeh-NM 
Life Brnn 

(TAB) 
Mu-L $14,500 


Perry Mason 

(7:30-8:30) 

Colgate (Bates) 

Parliament 

(BAB) 

My-F $80,000 


Bonanza 

(7:30-8:30) 

Gen. Foods 

(FC&B) 

DuPont (BBDO) 

W-F $78,000 




u 


Wagon Train 

B. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

Natl Blse. 

(Mc-E) 


Donna Reed 

Campbell 

(BBDO) 

alt 

Johnson & J 

(Y&R) 

Sc-F $38,000 


Playhouse of 
Stars 


Bat Masterson 
Sealtest (Ayer) 
Hill Bros. 
(West Coast) 
V-F $38,000 


Walt Disney 

Canada Dry 
(Mathes) 


Rawhide 
Colgate (Bates) 
Nabisco (Me-B) 

Wrlgley 

(EWRR) 


Cimarron City 


John Cunther's 

High Road 
Ralston (GBAB) 
Dr-F $31,000 


Perry Mason 
Sterling (DFB) 
Hamm (C-M) 


Bonanza 
segs open 


j 


3) 

r*B) 

(38.008 


Price Is Right 

Lever (OBM) 

alt Speldel 

(NCAK) 

J-L $21,500 


The Real 
McCoys 

PiO (Comptoe) 
8e-F $39,000 


Johnny Ringo 

S. C. Johnson 

(NLB) alt 

P. Lorlllard 

(LAN) 

tV-F $38,000 


Producers' 

Bris. -Myers 
(TAB) 

R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 
)r-F $11,000 


Man From 
Blackhawk 

Miles (Wade) 

K J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

W-F $38,000 


Hotel D'Paree 
Carter (SSCB) 

L&M (DFS) 
W-F $43,000 


Wichita Town 

sust 


Leave It To 
Beaver 

Ralston (Gardner, 

GBAB) 
Sc-F $30,000 


Wanted Dead 

or Alive 
Bm A Wmeoo 

(Bites) 
Kimberly-Clark 

(FC&B) 
W-F $39,000 


Man & Challenge 

R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) alt 

Chemstrand 

(DDB) 

A-F $36,000 




3atei) 
ewlng 
(42,000 


Happy 
Kraft (JWT) 
Ic-F $23,000 


Jeannie Carson 

P&G (Grey) 

(Bates) 
5c-F $16,000 


Zane Crey 
S. C. Johnson 

(B&B) 
General Foods 

(OBM) 
V-T $45,000 


achelor Father 
Whitehall 
(Bates) 
alt Am Tob 
(Gumblnner) 
c-F $42,000 


77 Sunset Strip 

(9-10) 

Am. Chicle 

(Bates) 

P&G (Grey) 

My-F $85,000 


Video Village 

P&G (B&B) 
Au-L $5,000 


Play Your 


Lawrence Welk 

(9-10) 
Dodge (Grant) 
Mu-L $45,000 


Mr. Lucky 
Lever (OBM) 
alt Bra & Wmsn 

(Bates) 
A-F $43,000 


The Deputy 
Kellogg(Burnett) 

(T&R) 
W-F $39,000 




Esty) 

ryers 
(27.000 


Tate 

Kraft (JWT) 
F-F $21,000 


Untouchables 
(9:30-10:30) 
Armour (FCB) 
L&M (Mc-E) 
JuPont (BBDO) 
Vhitehall (Bates) 
kly-F $80,000 


Markham 

Schlitz (JWT) 

alt Renault 

(Kudner) 

ly-F $39,000 


Wrangler 
, Ford (JWT) 
P-F $23,000 


77 Sunset Strip 
H. Ritchie 
(K&E) 
R. J. Reynolds 
(Esty) 
Whitehall 
(Bates) 


December Bride 

Gen. Foods 
Sc-F $32,000 


Masquerade 

Party 

Block Drug 

(Grey) 

5-L $18,000 


Lawrence Welk 


Have Gun, Will 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

alt Lever (JWT) 

W-F $40,000 


Project 20 

(9:30-10:30) 




•1 Hr 

0-11) 

>?' 
80.000 


This Is Your 

Life 
P&G (B&B) 
-L $52,000 


Untouchables 

Ritchie (K&E) 
Carnation 


Adventure 
Theatre 


You Bet Your 

Life 
J. B. Williams 
Jo. (Parkson) alt 
Lever (BBDO) 
l-L $53,000 


Robert Taylor 

starring in 

The Detectives 

P&G 

(B&B) 
My-F $45,000 


Twilight Zone 
Gen Food (Y&B) 

Kimberly-Clark 

(FCB) 
A-F $38,000 


foment of Fear 

(10-11) 
Lever (SSCB) 
ly-F $28,000 


Jubilee, U.S.A. 

(10-11) 

Maasey- Ferguson 

(NLAB) 

Polk Miller 

(Ayer) 

Mu-L $20,000 


Cunsmoke 
LAM (DFS) alt 

S perry -Rand 

(TAR) 

W-F $42,000 


Project 20 




.eatre 
• 11) 
lag 

)) 

80.000 


People Are 
Funny 

Block (Kay 

Spector) 

lenbrook (DFS) 

•F $24,000 


Silents Please 


To Tell The 
Truth 

I. Curtis (Reach- 
McClinton) alt 
R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 
:-L $22,000 


lo Net Service 


Black Saddle 

Carter (Bates) 
Chevrolet (C-E) 
A. Culver (Wade) 
w $38,000 
All-Star Football 
v IS; 10- 


Person to Person 

Carter (SSCB) 

alt All State 

(Burnett) 

I-L $000 


foment of Fear 
Jazz Age 

(8/5; 10-11) *) 


Jubilee. U.S.A. 
Inside Argonne 
(S/G; 10-12 Mid) 


No net service 


Man From 

Interpole 

Sterling (DFS) 

A-F $25,000 




t 























■mEF'i*-^ ££*•» iV Interv,ew ' < J > J^enile, (L) Ljye, (M) Misc. 

(Mu) Music, (My) Mystery, (N) News, (Q) Quiz-Panel, (Sc) Situation 

> (Comedy, (Sp) Sport*. (V) Variety, (W) Western. tNo charge for repeats 



jSPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



Philadelphia's prize reporter 

The Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcasters recently honored WRCV and WRCV-TV 
with six awards for outstanding news operations — the largest number won by any radio 
and television news department in the Commonwealth. These citations are particularly 
meaningful, coming as they do from a ''jury" of professional broadcasters. And from the 
people of Greater Philadelphia comes further recognition of the superior news service 
being rendered by both of these stations. WRCV-TV \s 11PM News and Weather programs, 
for instance, attract the largest viewing audience in Philadelphia, according to Nielsen.* 




VV.S7 Jan April, 1960 



MMRCV-TV 



NBC Owned Stations in Philadelphia • Sold by NBC Spot Sales 




DAYTIME 



C O 



P A 



I 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 






Lamp Unto My 
Feet 






December Bride 


Dough Re Mi 




>ecember Bride 


Dough Re Mi 

ergens (L 8/30) 
alt. sust. 






Look Up & Live 






Video Village 


Play Your 

Hunch 

Brn. & Wmsn. 

alt Whitehall 




Video Village 


Play Your 
Hunch 

Colgate alt sust 
Sterling alt 




Colgate 




FYI 






1 Love Lucy 


Price It Right 

SUrllng 

alt Whitehall 




1 Love Lucy 

Gen. Mills alt 
■ust 


Price Is Right 






Camera Three 






Far Horizon 


Concentration 

Culver alt 

Lever 

Mennen alt Lever 




Far Horizon 


Concentration 

Frlfldalre 
Alberto Culver 




alt Ton! 








Restless Cun 


Lev* of Life 

Amor Han* Prod 

alt Nablico 


Truth or 
Consequences 

Miles 

pao 


Restless Cun 

Armour, J&J 


Love of Life 
Gen. Mills 


Truth or 
Consequences 

Nabisco alt sust 
Culver alt sust 


Res 
Let 

c I 


Johns Hopkins 
File 7 






Love That Bob 

Sx-L«x, Johnson 

& J., Stales-, 

Toni, Gen. Mills. 

Lever 


Search for 
Tomorrow 

pao 


It Could Be You 

Culver alt sust 
P&G alt sust. 


Love That Bob 

3eech-Nut. Mln. 
Maid, Toni, 
Hill Bros. 


Search For 
Tomorrow 


It Could Be You 

Miles alt sust 


.ove 

Aloe 

Ura 

Bt 


PIcQ 


Guiding Light 


sust 


Co\\tf News 
Conference 






About Faces 

Min. Maid 
Whitehall 


No net service 


No net service 


About Faces 

Sterling Drug, 

Mills. Armour 


No net service 


No net service 


Abe 
B 1 


News 
(l:»-l:lt) 


News 
<l:tt-l:M> suit 










World Terns 

PAG 
Nabisco alt 

H. Curtis 


No net service 




World Turns 
PAO 

Sterling alt 

Carnation 


No net service 


Litjj 
Chi 


baseball Came 
of Week 

(partlc.) (1:45- 


Frontiers of 
Faith 




Baseball 




Day In Court 


Full Circle 


Queen for a 
Day 


Day In Court 

Toni, J.&.T., 
3en. Mills. S. C. 
Johnson, B-Nut 


Full Circle 


Queen for a 
east 


Day 

EiL 


TBA 


Lady Esther 


sust 




Baseball 


Major League 
Baseball 
Bayuk % 
regional 
Buseh Vi 


Cale Storm 

Mills, Sterling, 
Beech-Nut 


Art Linkletter 

Lever 

J. B. Williams 

Van Camp 


Loretta Young 
P&G 


Cale Storm 

Sterling, Ponds, 


Art Linkletter 
Scott 
alt Toni 
K.iioei 


Loretta Young 


u 


Open Hearing 
nit 




Major League 
Baseball 

various sponsort 


Seat The Clock 
Ex-Lax 


Millionaire 
Collate 


Young 
Dr. Malone 

Block alt sust 
P&G 


Beat The Clock 

Lever, J&J. 

Beech-Nut 
Lady Esther 


Millionaire 


Young 
Dr. Malone 

Proctor Elec. 


loal 

• 






Major League 
Baseball 


Who You Trust? 

B-Nut. J&J 
S. C. Johnson 


Verdict Is Yours 

Esso alt 


From These 
Roots 


Mho You Trust? 
Ex-Lax, Ponds 
Whitehall. Coty 
Lady Esther. 
Geo. Hills 


'erdict Is Yours 
Scott alt Toni 


From These 
Roots 








Major League 
Baseball 


American 
Bandstand 

Sen. Mills. Lever 
Polk Miller. 
Western Tablet 


Brighter Day 
PAO 


Comedy Theatre 


American 
Bandstand 

Welch. Lever. 

Western Tablet 


Brighter Day 
P&G 


Comedy Theatre 


1 d 

1 


Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 


Secret Storm 

Gen Mills 
alt Scott 


sust 








Amer. Band. 
'osltan. Armour 


Edge of Night 
PAO 

H Curtis alt 


Adventure Thea. 


Amer. Band. 
Toni. Hollywood 
?andy, Northam 

War., Plough 


Edge of Night 
Sterling" 

St, Brands 


Adventure Thea. 


h b 


Matty's Fundaf 
Mattel 




World Champ. 
Coif 


American 

Bandstand 

ee-op 






American 

Bandstand 

•o-op 








Lone Ranger 
Gen Milli 


Face the Nation 


No Net Service 


:aptain Gallant 
Gen. Mills 






Rocky & His 

Gen Mills 
Kool Aid 





























HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 
NETWORK TELEVISION 
COMPARAGRAPH 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages (42, > 
includes regularly scheduled programing from 1 Aug. t 
28 Aug., include (with possible exception of chanii 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly sch^d 





G 


R 


A 


P 


H 




1 AUG 


. - 28 AU< 


MESDAY 
1 NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


.* 


Dough Re Mi 
sust 




December Bride 


Dough Re Mi 




December Bride 


Dough Re Mi 




Heckle & Jeckle 
Gen. Mills 


Howdy Doody 
Nablsea 
alt sust 




Block Drug 
1 (L 8/31) 


Nabisco 


V ige 


Play Your 

Coty 




Video Village 


Play Your 

Colgate 
Miles alt 




Video Village 


Play Your 
Hunch 

Colgate alt sust 

Colgate alt sust 




Mighty Mouse 


Ruff & Reddy 
Geo Itodi 


.V imi 


Colgate alt 


* cy 


Price Is Right 
Frigidalre 

alt Bterllnt 




1 Love Lucy 

U. S. Steel alt 


Price Is Right 

Lever alt sust 
Mile* alt 




1 Love Lucy 

Best Fds alt sus 


Price Is Right 

Culver alt sust 




Lone Ranger 

Gen Mills 


Fury 
Sweets C«. 
Gen Food! 


5 


Gerber alt 


L 


Concentration 

Mile» 




Far Horizon 


Concentration 

alt Lever 
Helm alt 
Whitehall 




Far Horizon 


Concentration 

Miles alt Lever 
Lever alt 
Brn & Wmsn 




1 Love Lucy 


Circus Boy 

Miles alt NesUs 


Ntblieo alt 

Brlllo 




sust 




Truth or 

Consequences 
Helm 


Restless Cun 

Gen. Mills. Hill 

S. C. Johnson 

Ponds 


Love of Life 

sust alt Tonl 


Truth or 
Consequences 

PAG 


Restless Cun 

S. C. Johnson 
Ponds, Lever, 
Min. Maid 


Love of Life 

Lever 
Gen Mills alt 


Truth or 
Consequences 

Frig, alt sust 


Lunch With 
Soupy Sales 

Gen. Foods 
(8/27 S) 


Sky King 
Neblico 


True Story 
Bterllng Drut 


P&G alt 


* 
(to 


Could Be You 
Whitehall alt 


Love That Bob 

Armour, Sterllm 

Min. Maid. Toni 

J&J 


Search for 
Tomorrow 

P&Q 


It Could Be 

Mil- alt 
Nabisco 
PAO 


Love That Bob 

Beech-Nut, JAJ 

Coty, Armour 

Gen. Foods 


Search for 

Tomorrow 

PAG 

Guiding Light 


Could Be You 

Frlgldaire 
alt sust 
PAG alt 
Rrillo 




Saturday News 


Detective Diary 
Bterllng Drui 


Heinz alt sust 


Guiding Light 


ice 

■ Hit 


No net service 


About Faces 


No net servic 


No net service 


About Faces 

S. C. Johnson 
Lever, Hill Bros 


No net service 


No net service 


No net service 




Mr. Wizard 


Lever, Beech-Nu 


(1:15-1:39) sust 


II 


No net service 




As the World 

Turns 

PAG 

PtlUbury 


No net service 




World Turns 

Best Foods 

Gen Mills 

alt Stand. Brand 


No net service 








• 


Queen for a 
Day 


Day In Court 

Gen. Fds., Leve 
J&J. Coty. 


Full Circle 

Toni alt sust 


Queen-Day 

sust alt Heinz 


Day In Court 

Min. Maid, Ton 
Beech-Nut, Ex 


Full Circle 

Lever alt aust 

— 


Queen for a 
Day 

Nabisco alt sust 
Culver alt Blocl 




Baseball Came 
of Week 

Falstaff, Colgate 
State Farm Ins 




sust 


■ Iter 


Loretta Young 

Nestle alt »ust 
Frlgldaire alt 


Gale Storm 

Staley, Gen. 
Mills, Lever, J& 


Art Unkletter 

Lever alt Dracket 
Plllibury 


Loretta Young 
alt P&G 


Gale Storm 
J&J, S. C. John 

Gen. Mills 


Art Unkletter 
Bauer & Black 


Loretta Young 




Sp-L $6,000,000" 




P&G alt sust 


Heinz alt P&G 


• 


Young 
Dr. Malone 
Plough, B&W. 
Heinz, Jergens 


Beat The Cloc 

Johnson & J., 
Gen. Foods 


Millionaire 

alt sust 
Drackett alt sus 


Young 
Dr. Malone 

Miles alt Culve 

P&G alt sust 


Beat The Cloc 

Beech-Nut, Leve 


Millionaire 

Colgate alt sust 


Young 
Dr. Malone 

Coty alt Mennei 
Sterling alt 










sust 


ours 

t v. 
.it 


From These 
Roots 

Brn. & Wmsn. 


Who You Trust 

Ponds, Gen. Fds 
Lever, B-Nut, 
Tonl, Armour 


Verdict Is Your 

Sterling alt Lev* 
Toni alt 


From These 
Roots 

Jergens alt sust 


Who You Trust 

Gen. Mills. Pond 
Staley. Beech- 
Nut. S. C. John 


Verdict Is Your 

1 Gen Mills 
alt sust 


From These 
Roots 










Comedy Theatn 
sus 


Amer. Band. 
Lever, Gen Mill 
B.-Nut. Welch 
Armour, Holly- 


Brighter Day 
PAG 




Amer. Band. 

Welch, Gen. 
Mills, Lever, 
Toni, Polk Mllle 


Brighter Day 

Best Foods 


Comedy Theatre 


Natl-.Amer. 
League Basebal 

Gillette 






Secret Storm 

Rem. Rand 


sust 


Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prcx 




tto 

at 


Adventure Thea 


Ame. Band. 

Plough, Northam 
Warren. Tonl 
Positan. Westen 


Edge of Night 

PAG 

Plllibury 


Adventure Thea 


Amer. Band. 
Armour, Albert 
Culver, Plough 
Western Tablet 


Edge of Night 

J. B. Williams 

Amer Home 

alt 


Adventure Thea 












American 
Bandstand 






American 
Bandstand 

OB-OP 
















Rocky and 
His Friends 
Gen Mills 






Rin Tin Tin 
Gen Mills 
Kool-Ald 












i 

we 
ms 
nd 


•These are pac 

programs a 
11, with air 
not listed 
ay-Friday, 


iage prices anc 

ppearing c 
dates. The 
are : Toni£ 
jarticipatin 


include time, 

uring this 
only regula 
'kt, NBC, 

; sponsorsh 


talent, producti 

period are 
rly schedule 
Ll:15 p.m.-] 
ip ; Sunday 


on and cable c 

listed 
d pro- 
a.m., 
News 1 


Special, CB 
i.m., Monda 
md 8:45-9 
Daylight Sa^ 


5, Sunday, 
y-Friday, pa 

a.m., Monc 

ing. 


11-11:15 p 
rticipating ; 
lay-Friday. 


m. ; Today 
News CBS, 
All time 


, NBC, 7-9 
7:45-8 a.m. 
periods are 



WTHI-TV 

the 

Number One 

single station 

market 

in 

America! 




"•Hit. '"•■ 




WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL lO 

TERRE HAUTE, 

INDIANA 

Represented by THE BOLLING CO. 



CANADIAN PAY TV 

{Continued from page 33) 

tenth of the coin-box-equipped tv sets 
in Etobicoke are tuned to a pa\ t\ 
film on an average evening. This 
a-:-innes that a 30-40'V film does 
equal amounts of business on each 
of its three or four nights, which is 
obviouslv not the case. Tuesday 
nights, according to Trans-Canada 
Telemeter's director of operations 
Bill Crampton. is still a low gross 
night for the paid system, at least 
partly explained by the hefty enter- 
tainment competition from commer- 
cial tv during the regular season. 
Saturdavs and Sundays — with a mati- 
nee each, and three or four showings 
respectively of the feature film — are 
big days. 

It's the multiple-channel character 
of Telemeter which makes it loom 
large as a tv competitor. Telemeter 
now transmits three separate program 
services over its 95 miles of leased 
Bell Telephone coaxial cable. As a 
rule, two of these programs are films 
on channels A and B that require 
pavment 1 so far SI for a feature. 75c 
for one special Golden Gloves boxing 
show, 25c for children's matinees: 
prices can be adjusted at any time 1 . 
Channel C can usually be viewed free, 
and it offers a program of local com- 
munity news, weather, previews of 
films on the other channels, panel dis- 
cussions, public service productions 
and sponsored films. 

In practice this means that while 
"North by Northwest" was getting its 
36 r 7 audience on 13-16 March on 
channel B. "Cash McCall" was its 
first competition lit ran 11-13 
March 1 on channel A. followed by 
"Gigi," which was shown 14-17 
March. So from this it appears that 
two films are each doing somewhere 
between 10-15 r V business on any 
given night. It follows then that 
about 25 c c of the subscribers' sets 
are tuned to paid-for films on an 
average night (discounting any free 
viewing on channel Cl. 

This could represent an alarming 
loss of commercial tv audience for at 
least two peak hours a night. Films 
are usually transmitted during the 
week at about 7 p.m.. with a repeat 
at around 9 p.m. Weekends the sched- 
ule is advanced to include one or two 
earlier showings and a matinee. 

But paving viewers may even 
spend more than a two-hour averse 



watching Telemeter films because 
the recognized tendencv of people ti 
stay with it and watch the secora 
showing of the film at no extr. 
charge, just as they do in theatres. 

What do the guinea pigs of Tele 
meter's test think about pay tv 

To some extent this question 
academic since all subscribers, i 
varying degree, are paying to watd 
films. Every dollar in coins is taka 
as a measure of their approval. Natu 
rally this involves the most close!; 
guarded of Telemeters secrets an 
guessing is rampant. From variou 
indications and a brief survev. CAM 
in an sponsor calculates the averag 
Telemeter subscriber spends well o\e 
•810 a month on films, more likel 
$15. I The unverified average of on 
small sample was SI 7 a month. > 

The head of one subscribing hou>e 
hold revealed he was astounded t< 
discover that in one month his famil 
had spent S22 for films on Telemete 
' they must have seen all but 
films that month 1 . Immediately 
issued orders to cut this in half, 
the familv hasn't managed this 

Another familv spokesman. 



. tt 



two young children, reported 1 
spends about SI 7 a month on Tel 
meter films. He figures this is 1^ 
than he used to pav for baby sitter? 

Another man said his family s 
about S12 a month in the coinbo: 
which he directly contributed 01. \\ 
$5; his wife invested the other $7 
nights when he was out. He a's< 
mentioned a phenomenon reminisce! 
of the early days of commercial I 
two or three neighbors, all Telemetei 
equipped, often gather around ooi 
set to watch a paid film. 

Telemeter's collection routine v*ai 
originally based on the assumpti n 
the coinbox would hold a maximunr 
of S48. It is known that several boxes 
have been collected with well 
$50, so the collection schedule ha: 
been advanced from once every 6( 
days to a 6-week cycle. 

From 21 July to 7 July inclusi e 
Telemeter showed 14 different feature 
films. It is reasonably certain tha 
many subscribers saw nearly all oi 
them. Some subscribers are actual! 
on record as having viewed every one 
of the 28 films a month. 

Editor's note: Part Tuo in tht pay 
tv story, dealing uith Telemeter' 
grouth and the people behind it, v (J 
appear in next ueek's issue. 



1 AUGUST 1960 




The big switch is here! WTVM is moving to Channel 9 in September! 



We will operate on 316,000 watts power . . . broadcasting from a 

tower whose beacon is 1,760 feet above mean sea level, located 16 air 

miles southeast of Columbus, Georgia. We know our coverage will be 

great . . . and we will announce the figures soon! 

In the meantime, we invite you to estimate the total number of TV 

homes we will cover! 

The closest estimate to the actual number of TV homes in the new 

WTVM coverage area will receive 10 shares of stock in Tom Huston 

Peanut Company (Tom's Toasted Peanuts) of Columbus. 

To prove you can't lose on WTVM, every entry will receive a souvenir 

gift box from Tom Huston Peanut Company! 

All entries must be in Columbus not later than September 15, 1960. 

In case of ties, the entry with the earliest postmark will win. The 

decision of our judges will be final. 

Get out your slide rule! Put on your thinking cap! Write a number 

(a big, BIG number) on a postal card, with your name and address. 

Send to Department "Wow!", WTVM, Columbus, Georgia. 



%M M 



> WTVM will be Georgia's 
second largest TV market! 



• WTVM will broadcast from 
the tallest tower in Georgia! 



• WTVM will be one of the 
top 1 5 markets in the South! 



CHANNEL 9 

lolumbos, Ga. ABC-NBC 

Only full time primary ABC station 
between Atlanta and the Gulf! 82% 
unduplicated audience! Top NBC 
programs! 



0@@Q 




Now ready for fall schedules! 

Call your ADAM YOUNG man for 

top ABC-NBC availabilities! 

ONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



Ask about combination rates on 
WTVC CH. 9 Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Another Martin Television Outlet 
The No. 1 night time station in Chattanooga!* 

-March, I960 ARB 



With national spot falling behind local, SPONSOR ASKS: 

What local radio techniques 

should be applied to national 



R. J. Bennett, general manager, WAYE, 
Baltimore 

Most local salesmen, whether in- 
tentionally or unwittingly, use the 
marketing approach in their sales 
pitches. In other words, they are fa- 
miliar with the potential advertiser's 
products or services, they know his 
sales objectives, and therefore can 
offer down-to-earth, practical advice 
on the way his station should be used 
to fulfill the advertiser's marketing 
objectives. 

I realize that this is far more diffi- 
cult to achieve on the national scene. 
But in my experience, some station 
reps are much more interested in 
selling time than the advertiser's 
products. This is extremely short- 
sighted, because only the first sale is 
made on trust. All subsequent sales 
are made on results. Reps should be 
interested in the client's marketing 
strategy and objectives. 

Local advertisers generally know al- 
most immediately how successful a 
radio flight is. Their gauge is the 
cash register, and when it jingles 
happily, they know the station is 
doing a good job. 

It is much more difficult for a na- 
tional agency to discover how well a 
station is moving merchandise. Often 
they never find out, which in good 
part explains the prevalence of rating 




buying. There is one way a national 
rep can overcome this drawback: that 
is to get the station to make up evi- 
dence reports and then take these re- 
ports to appropriate people at the 
agency and client. 

Reports can be statements of super- 
market managers, the client's own dis- 
trict sales managers, or reports from 



wholesalers and distribution on the 
increased movement of merchandise. 
They can be the volume of proof-of- 
purchase items, such as box tops, re- 
ceived as the result of special contests 
and promotions. They can be the vol- 
ume of mail or phone calls solicited 
by other contests or tie-ins. But it is 
possible to give the national adver- 
tiser what his local counterpart ac- 
cepts as a matter of course — knowl- 
edge of the effectiveness of a cam- 
paign on any station. 

Most local salesmen are paid on a 
commission basis, while most reps 
remunerate their men with straight 
salaries. All salesmen, being human, 
need incentives of various sorts, and 
what will stimulate a salesmen more 
than a bundle of juicy greenbacks 
hanging tantalizing in front of him? 
Our rep pays on a commission basis, 
which is undoubtedly one of the ma- 
jor reasons behind its excellent sell- 
in" record. 



Bill Venell, national sales manager, 
WPBC, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. 

Many informed quarters— includ- 
ing the radio/tv trade press — have 
expressed amazement that while local 
radio sales are booming throughout 
the country, national spot radio is 
stagnant, or at best, shows mild in- 
creases. 

Contrary to much popular opinion, 
I don't believe that it is because na- 
tional advertisers and their agencies 
have been derelict in recognizing the 
tremendous advantages and effective- 
ness of the spot radio medium. 

I believe that a great deal of the 
onus lies in the fact that radio is sold 
different on the local level, and ob- 
viously the local way is the better 
way. Therefore, it follows that na- 
tional salesmen, that is the reps, could 
learn a great deal from their local 
sales brethren. 

Good local salesmen sell creative 
ideas, not merely units of time! By 
creative ideas, I don't mean fancy, 
abstract concepts. I refer to a plan 



of action that will take in considera- 
tion the advertiser's product, the kin 
of people it should be appealed to, 
and the way the radio station will i 
tegrate these two factors in to a cam- 
paign that will reach the largest 
amount of these logical prospects 




with a message tailored to best moti-i 
vate them. It may involve a copy 
approach. 

Admittedly, this type of creativ< 
sale is more difficult on the national 
scene. But it can be accomplished. 
Our rep has done it for us. 

Too many national salesmen forget 
that a station's own sound is one J 
its best selling points. Locally, mosi 
merchants are familiar with a sta 
tion's programing, or have only tc 
turn on a radio set to tune in am 
particular program. Many local sales! 
men now 7 carry transistor radios at a 
times for such a purpose. 



James L. Rubenstone, national sale 

manager. WJMJ, Philadelphia 

One of the big differences betweei 
local sales and national spot selling is 
too often, one of basic approach anc 
attitude. However, a good local oi 
a good national salesman knows tha 
his job is never done. 

With most national reps, the actua 
situation is slightly different. Eacl 
salesman has his own list of agencies 
to cover, and when there is no new 
business breaking anywhere, there is 
a temptation to sit back and wait ioi 
the phone to ring. Since he has i 
number of markets, surely something 
will break somewhere in the entir 
U. S. Before relaxing, the rep sales 
man should mentally answer: A. 



50 



sales? 



know pretty well every single spot 
juyer in all my agencies. B. Have 

made anv calls this week on buyers 

ho aren't, at the moment, active? 
iThis is a good time, when they're 

ot rushed, to fill them in on station 
lacts and results.) C. Have I made 

lany missionary calls recently? It is 

uestion C that is usually ignored, 
too often, a negative answer would 

pply, even if it was "Have I made 

ny missionary calls?" 

Our rep, like the good local sales- 
men, never sits back. When they can't 

et any further with the timebuyer, 
hey call upon the account executive, 

r even the client himself. And this 
H not bitterly resented, as might often 
|>e supposed. As long as the upper 

chelons are approached with new 
! |nd creative ideas to better use radio, 

Ind the agency is kept informed, even 
lient calls are applauded when the 
purpose is to induce the advertiser to 

new money into the medium. 
' Fertile territory for our national 

Kepresentatives have been agencies 
fho specialize in print and never or 
sarely use radio spot. Maybe some 
^tever used radio because they don't 
understand the medium and its ad- 
vantages, or don't know how to use 
t. And others, because a radio rep 
iadn"t pitched them on the medium 
\ithin human memory! 
And, of course, clients who adver- 



Approach every 
type advertiser, 




ise substantially in other media, but 
ghtly or not at all in radio, have 
iroven worth the effort. Our own 
ep's high success has been in win- 
ling client sales managers, rather than 
id\>rtising managers, taking the posi- 
ion that radio should be an exten- 
ion of the client's local sales force in 
i market. ^ 

sor • 1 august 1960 




Ymi'n Got to Head (oi tk Futwk Line 
k k in tke Money / 



Your campaign will finish in the money if you start 
by buying broadcast I N Lexington. In all the world, 
only Lexington broadcasters effectively influence 
the $445,793,000 retail purchases made by 559,200 
people in the growing 30 -county Lexington trading 
area. Get your share of $657,165,000 consumer spend- 
able income by buying broadcast IN Lexington . . . 
Don't head the wrong direction in planning your 
next campaign. 



You Have to Buy LEXINGTON 

to Cover the Rich, Growing 

30-County 

Central 

Kentucky 

Market 




FROM THE FABULOUS FIVE IN LEXINGTON 

WBLG * WlAP * WVLK * WKYT-TV *WIEX-TV 



TV TAB 

{Continued from pape 32) 
section which includes this small in- 
dependent and non-committed group. 
One network man estimates this 
non-committed segment of the popu- 
lation is no more than 20% of tv's 
total audience, but political campaign- 
ing will have to reach the 100% to 
get through to the 20%. That's why 
saturation spot drives will supplement 
major network appearances. And it's 
also why some political admen are 
thinking of network spot carriers 
during prime nighttime periods as 



well as spot package plans which give 
them favorable frequency discounts. 

The networks will be particularly 
wary of devices, gadgetry, and rigged 
discussion this year, and all of them 
are agreed that none of these can be 
used in any of the time which they 
make available without charge. 

"We're not censoring," as NBC 
TV's Bill Hedges says, "but we're 
also not going to be accused of phony 
presentations. Nor will any party be 
permitted to play hob with pre-emp- 
tions and ride herd on our program 
structure." The network's policy is to 



Two More Surveys 

AGREE 

In Minneapolis-St. Paul it's 

WPBC 

Conlan Verifak 

Station A 23.8 20.3 

Station B 20.1 18.6 

Station WPBC 18.3 16.7 

Station D 9.1 9.7 

Station E 7.3 7.6 

Station F 6.4 7.2 

Station C 4.9 6.3 

Station H 3.1 4.4 

Station I 2.6 3.4 

Station J 2.6 3.1 

Station K 1.8 2.7 

Note identical relative standings in the market 

** Verifak — Average all day share — May 7960 

* Conlan — Average all day share — June 7960 



AM-FM 



William V. Stewart 
WPBC President 



WPBC 



Adult Radio 

Broadcast Time Sales 
National Representatives 



permit no more than two pre-enij 
tions of any program period — fivi 
minute or longer — and just because' 
party asks for a certain time peru 
by no means ensures it'll be given. 

A CBS TV spokesman points 01 
that some politicians have learned th 
hard way that they shouldn't pr, 
empt top-rated shows because of pul 
lie resentment against them. Politico 
are also being more careful this yea 
about the days on which they was 
to have their candidates appear. Sui 
day is out of the question, they fed 
because of the religious proclivity 4 
the Southern Bible Belt. The nej 
works say the two major parties £ 
most interested in Wednesday, fo 
lowed — in this order — by Thursdaj 
Tuesday, Friday, Monday. Saturda 

The networks prefer — and the 
think the candidates and the publ 
will, too — a simple, direct present^ 
tion of major candidates discussiri 
issues alone or in debate. But or 
network realist maintains that neitha 
party has learned how to handle th 
kind of exposed-views situation we| 
enough to keep an audience, 
thinks the parties — even if they ai 
able to use those 19 hours of prirri 
time which the networks will gn 
them — would be hard put to fill moil 
than an hour or two each week in tl 
six-to-eight-week campaign. 

His guess, therefore, is that the fre 
time offer — providing, of course, th; 
Senate Joint Resolution 207 pass( 
this month — will be whittled to som 
thing approximating the ABC T 
suggestion: rotating one hour week 
among the networks for a total i 
nine hours or three hours per ne 
work, with half of each hour going t 
the GOP and to the Democrats. 

The campaign is bound to be or 
of test involving precedents. If Coi 
gress passes the waiver for equ; 
time, the results of the one-year mon 
torium will be perused by the FC( 
At that time, recommendations ma 
be made for this waiver to be a pe 
manent stipulation. 

Industry observers tend to agr< 
that the combination of free and pai 
time for the candidates will give th 
public the best showcase in politic! 
history. They predict that the majc 
contenders will reach new heights dj 
accomplishment with this electron™ 
debating device, but that some of thjj 
quickie, slogan selling in annourceli 
ments may zoom them downward tj| 
new political lows. 



• 1 AUGUST l ( '6l 




Lake spent over 100 days in Alabama's Kilby 
Prison observing prison life — and the prisoners 
themselves — firsthand. His reports sparked ap- 
pointment of a special commission of the Ala- 
bama legislature which is bringing about a com- 
plete revamping of the Alabama penal system. 



Lake stayed on the "Phenix City" story contin- 
uously for six-and-a-half months . . . from the 
time of the murder of the Alabama attorney gen- 
eral nominee and the calling out of the national 
guard to the final indictment of 1500 persons and 
the demise of "America's Wickedest City." 



Former City Editor of The Birmingham News . . . 

Ace Reporter for Miami Herald 

CLANCY LAKE 

named News Director 
for WAPI & WAPI-TV 

Clancy Lake, the man who 
shocked America with his 
coverage of the Phenix 
City cleanup . . . The man 
| who spent 3 months in pri- 
son to report on condi- 
■ tions in the Alabama Penal 
l 1 system . . . The man who 
worked seven years to free a convicted mur- 
derer he knew was innocent. . . . has now 
turned his news reporting abilities to broad- 
cast news and it is with pride that WAPI 
and WAPI-TV announce his appointment 
as News Director. 





: (Left) While reporting on a snake-handling cult which had come into 

| Alabama, Lake observed snake handlers demonstrating their faith by 

handling live copperheads. Two worshipers were killed . . . and Lake's 

stories helped lead to new state laws designed to prevent such rites. 

(Right) Lake carried on a one-man crusade and appeared before the 
J pardon and parole board 14 times and secured the assistance of "The 
I Court of Last Resort" on behalf of Ellis Fewell, sentenced to 30 years 
I imprisonment for murder. After seven years Lake finally won a full 
\ pardon for Fewell. 



WAPI 

TELEVISION AND RADIO, BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



WAPI-TV Repr 


sented nation 


ally by Ham 


gton, Righter 


Parsons 








WAPI-Radio Re 


presented nat 


onally by He 


ry |. Chnstal 



PONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 




\ie4 ai> 






That's what they say in Frankfort (Kentucky, that is) about the 
radio station that serves the state's largest single-station market! 



WKY 



Frankfort also is the State Capitol, and the home of Schenley, Na- 
tional and "21 Brands" distilleries, where they make more whiskey 
per capita than any other place on earth. 



Call HOLLINGBERY! 



250 watts 

1490 

THE HORTON-KINCAID STATIONS 

At 



Home office: Top of the Phoenix Hotel, 
Lexington, Kentucky 




WHOO 

ORLANDO 



WVhK 



wcm \ 



LEXINGTON WHEELING-BELLAIRE FRANKFORT ASHLAND-HUNTINGTO J 

SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 19601 






Whais happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, statiens 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



I AUGUST I960 

Copyright 1990 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The FCC has departed from its custom of issuing preliminary financial reports 
on radio and television industries: these reports have customarily been released consid- 
erably earlier in the year. 

A commission spokesman said that this year final reports of earnings in these industries 
would be the only ones issued, and that they are not expected in any case before mid- 
August. 

There is considerable significance in the explanation. Fact is, the Commission has been 
taking people away from this sort of work. 

It is another illustration of the fact that all FCC energies have been channeled into back- 
ing up its new tough attitude toward regulation. Congress has been somewhat backward 
about supplying enough funds. Many legislators wanted to point to the industry with alarm 
and it was convenient to have so-called FCC lassitude as a whipping-boy. 



The excellent job done by the networks in covering the national conventions 
could revive what appeared to be a dead bill. 

Neither Oren Harris nor any member of the House Commerce Committee of which he is 
chairman showed any disposition to push the Senate-passed bill amending Sec. 315, the po- 
litical equal time section. 

The bill would lift that section entirely with respect to presidential and vice presidential 
candidates, so the networks and stations would not have to give equal time for Lincoln- 
Douglas debates, etc. 

Key Congressmen have already been expressing satisfaction with convention coverage and 
with network plans for covering campaigns. But many of these plans depend on House pas- 
sage of that neglected bill. 

The House doesn't come back into session until 15 August, one week after the Senate, 
and a clear picture of prospects for the bill will not be possible until the lawmakers gather. 



The FCC commissioners weren't too far apart on what to do about program- 
ing: opposition to the staff recommendation that the Commission set up over-all standards 
stations must follow was general among those who will do the actual voting. 

On the other hand, there was substantial agreement that stations should be required to 
live up to programing promises made voluntarily when applications were made for licenses. 

As has been reported from time to time on this page, the majority still appears to favor 
an affirmative showing by a Ucensee or an original applicant as to community 
needs. Also to be required — if this view prevails, as still seems likely — would be a narrative 
description of how these needs would be met by the applicant. 

Then the applicant would be held to his commitments, or would be required to give a 
convincing explanation of why he departed from his plans. This is where the new Complaints 
and Compliance Division would come into the act. 

Each week, the Commission has been arguing things through a little bit farther. Although 
it appeared impossible that final action would come in this final week before the August re- 
cess, a series of announcements might reasonably be expected in September. 



• 1 AUGUST 1960 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen^ 



SPONSOR HEARS 



I AUGUST I960 Don't be surprised if one of the intercontinental air services switches its account. 

copyright i860 It'll be due to the old story: strong opposition from below due to the fact that the boss is- 

sponsor letting a close friendship at the agency color his evaluation. 

publications inc. Traffic and earnings haven't been as good as the competitions' of late. 

Revlon, which controls a block of the Schick electric shaver stock, has started 
calling the plays with decided vigor. 

Among the latest moves : ( 1 ) ordering that Schick headquarters be shifted from Lan«! 
caster, Pa., to New York; (2) offering McKesson-Robbins a franchise to handle thej 
shaver in the wholesaler's distribution area. 



Here's a theory voiced along Michigan Avenue as to why major accounts nevei 
quite settle down in Chicago branches of New York-headquartered agencies: 

• When a new business pitch is made the team is generally top-heavy with New Yorkj 
brass. 

• The pitch is usually on the basis of New York know-how and facilities. 

• After the account is landed, it is dumped into what is generally a not-so-strong Chicago* 
branch, where it just sits waiting for direction from New York. 

• New York meantime has gone on to greater heights and forgets about the new account 
out in Chicago. 

• Some midwest accounts have become wise to this jabberwocky and are demanding their 
accounts be handled out of the agency's New York office. 

A rep discovered last week that this procedure doesn't endear one to a time 
buyer: disclosing that somebody else got a better buy on a station competitor oi 
the rep's. 

The timebuyer in question, after finding this was so, upbraided the rep for "raising doubts 
about my being hep to what was going on." 



Some marketers hold that a manufacturer of durables takes a calculated rial 
when he commits himself to a quasi-institutional advertising contract a year in ad 
vance. 

The market for the products can change radically meanwhile and he finds himself u{ 
against the clamor from his brand managers for part of that already committed mon 
ey that they can put to other promotional uses. 

Such a situation is described as prevailing at the moment within one of the big appli 
ance companies. 

A New York metropolitan account has given the relations with its agencies ai 
odd twist: The advertiser's tv spokesman checks among suppliers and others on how the) 
feel toward certain of the executives in the agencies. 

Look for U.S. Tobacco, as part of its diversification sprint, to get into the cand) 
bar business. ' 

It just acquired nut packaging firms in Philadelphia and on the westcoast. 
U.S. Tobacco has lots of cash on hand to make outright buys. 



SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 19 




...on 

H/m OAfeatts- 




i at Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop 



WWL-TV. . . new New Orleans Favorite 

Romper Room, WWL-TV's standout morning 
show, delivers the audience at the lowest cost-per- 
thousand of any kid show in the New Orleans 
market — even lower than afternoon kid shows. 
It makes sound sales sense to catch the kids in the 
morning before mom goes to shop — not in the late 
afternoon, when she has already completed her 
day's shopping. ARB (April, 1960) shows Romper 
Room leading all competition with a 9 rating. 

Represented nationally by Katz 




WWL-TV • 

NEW ORLEANS 



Hi OR • 1 august 1960 



59 



ADVERTISERS 



NEWS & IDEA 

WRAP-UP 



SMALL WAR IN BIG WAY was skillfully 
accomplished by WLW tv stations in Cincin- 
nati in 30-minute fi Im of Battle of Gettysburg. 
Here, dir. Carlos Mittag (I) works with cam- 
eraman Norm Denlinger on table miniatures 



WELL-STASHED in Philadelphia trust com- 
pany vault is WBIG's WBIGLAND currency 
to be used in upcoming contest. Keeping 
guard over station's (l-r) Harvey Miller, Dean 
Tyler, Jerry Stevens is "Miss WBIGLAND" 




Schlitz (J^VT) is becoming 
sponsor in a national news -tr 
for the first time. 

It's buying into Doug Ednards a 
the Yens. Involved is a 10' c reci 
tion in the price of the program. 

National spot radio activity 
of the midwest the past week i. 
eluded a farm implement fir 
and a battery manufacturer. 

They were: John Deere \ 
i Gardner. St. Louis i and Rav-O-Y 
I Howard Monk. Rockford. 111. | 

For those who rank their marK< 
according to population, here 
the figures issued by the Censj 
Bureau for the leading 25 cities. 

RANK CITY 1960 POPULATK 

1. New York 

2. Chicago 3.492.9 

3. Los Angeles 2.44S.0 

4. Philadelphia 1.959.9 

5. Detroit 1.672 5 

6. Houston 932.6 

7. Baltimore 921 J 



NEWEST SPECIES IN CLEVELAND ZOO— is man; this particular one answering to name of Swingm Sweeney, new KYW evening personal! 
nabbed and put in captivity by an alert listener, who followed clues broadcast by the station during the week preceding Sweeney's first si 




Cleveland 
\\ ashington, D.C. 
St. Louis 
Milwaukee 
San Francisco 
Boston 
Dallas 

New Orleans 
Pittsburgh 
San Antonio 
Seattle 
San Diego 
Buffalo 
Memphis 
Denver 
Cincinnati 
I. Atlanta 
Minneapolis 



869,867 
7 16,958 
740,424 
734,788 
715,609 
677,626 
672,117 
620.979 
600,684 
584,471 
550,525 
547,294 
528,387 
491,691 
489,217 
487,462 
485,425 
181.026 



amnrs Beer retained its #1 
>-ition in ARB's Best-Liked 
ommercial June talley. 

Johnson's Baby Powder moved in- 
second place and Piel's Beer held 
wn the third spot. 
• Here is how the survey lines up: 

% COMMERCIAL 
: BRAND MENTION 

Hamms Beer 8.5 

Johnson Babv Powder 5.0 



,H 



3. Piels Beer 

4. Dial Soap 

5. Burgermeister Beer 

6. Dodge 
Seven-Up 

8. Ford 

9. Ivory Soap 
Mr. Clean 

1. Kelloggs 

2. Fizzies 

L & M Cigarettes 
National Beer 
Snowdrift 

6. Kraft Foods 

7. Post Cereals 

8. Gillette 
Falstaff Beer 
Plymouth 

21. Brylcreem 
Chevrolet 



I'). 



3.6 
3.4 
3.4 
2.7 
2.5 
2.5 
2.4 
1.8 
1.8 
1.8 
1.8 
1.7 
1.4 
1.3 
1.2 
1.2 
1.1 
1.1 



Campaigns : 

• Air France ( BBDO ) has embarked 
on its most intensive campaign to 
advertise its off-season economy pack- 
age. The air line will use radio spot 
announcements in 10 major markets 
including New York, Chicago and 
Los Anseles. 



• The Dow Chemical Company 

has planned a major introduction pro- 
gram that will total several million 
dollars for Handi-Wrap. a transparent 
sandwich wrap. The company will 
train its sights on the lunch box wrap 
market, and will push the product on 
the Dow Hour of Great Mysteries and 
other network tv shows. The campaign 
will break nationally in October. 
Agency: Norman, Craig & Kummel. 

• Bon Ami I Cole, Fischer & Re- 
go w 'I. Seeco Records (Lee-Myles 
Associates) and Allied Record Man- 
ufacturing ( Hixon & Jorgensen) 
have joined for a record premium 
program. The album, Bon Amigo, 
consists of Jose Melis hits. The con- 
sumer encloses $1.00 with either a 
hanger or package from a Bon Ami 
product to receive an album. The pro- 
gram will be promoted on the lack 
Paar Show, starting mid-September 
and run for about 30 days. 

• The Northwest Plaster Bureau 
(Kraft, Smith & Ehrig) launched a 
vear long campaign on KOMO-AM- 
TV, Seattle. Radio plans call for 
weekend announcements; the tv cam- 



AWAIIAN HEYDAY lasted week during 
SAI's Hawaiian promotion at Cincinnati 
opping center. Here, sta.'s Ron Britain (I), 
young dancers, accompanist listen in on 
II from Islands-vacationing Jack Reynolds 



IB 


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TRACK NIGHT for WNEW, N.Y., 
which was recently honored at Yonkers 
Raceway. Awarding transistor radio 
to winning driver Billy Haughton: 
(r-l) sta.'s v.p.-g.m. John Sullivan 
with wife and sports dir., Kyle Rote 



GOING TO BAT is Campbell- 
Mithun's (Mpls.) Softball team, out 
to win for clients as well as agency. 
Sewing client logo on team captain 
Bob Anderson: bd. chmn. Ray Mithun 



paign i- directed t" housewives on a 
daytime schedule, Wednesday through 
Saturday. 



NAB's Tv Code Review Board 
subcommittee pointed a critical 
finger at agencies responsible for 
bra and girdle commercials. 

The subcommittee granted that 
there's been much improvement in 
the presentations of personal products 
commercials, but reported that the 
bras and girdles were still somewhat 
outside the pale of acceptance. 

Agency appointments: The Men- 
nen Company appointed Tatham- 
Laird for Speed Stick deodorant for 
men, Afta Shave lotion, Quinsana, 
Athlecin, and four new products; es- 
timated billings at start : $750,000 . . . 
Chrysler Corporation's Airtemp Divi- 
sion transferred its account from De- 
troit to Grant's New York office . . . 
Chicago Dodge Retail Selling Associa- 
tion to BBDO . . . Ruberoid Co., all 
divisions, to Kastor Hilton Chesley 
Clifford & Atherton . . . Frith Cor- 
poration, for its Fashion Firsts, to 
Parsons, Friedmann & Central 
. . . California Physician's Service, 
billing $150,000 to Gumpertz, Bent- 
ley & Dolan . . . Catalina Savings 
& Loan Association, to S. J. Kos- 
sack, Tucson . . . Boston Safe De- 
posit and Trust Co. appointed Mogul 
Williams & Saylor, N. Y. 

Thisa 'n' data: The Nielsen Cou- 
pon Clearing House broke ground 
for a new headquarters building in 
Clinton, Iowa . . . Allied Advertis- 
ing, Cleveland, recipient of an 
AFTRA citation for the best radio 
commercial of 1959-60. 

Admen on the move: Alex Os- 
born, co-founder of BBDO, resigned 
from the board and executive com- 
mittee . . . John V. McAdams elected 
to president, and Howard C. Allen 
to vice chairman, Albert Frank-Guen- 
ther Law . . . Olin W. Hoskins ap- 
pointed executive vice president, 
Robert Haas Advertising . . . Frank 
L. Woodruff named vice president, 
Lennen & Newell . . . Rodney Al- 
bright, James Hayes and Frank 
Reed, elected vice presidents, SSCB 
. . . Dermott McCarthy, to vice 



president, Y&R . . . William S. Rob- 
inson and Carlton Zucker named 
vice presidents, Leo Burnett . . . 
Riehard L. Eastland, appointed vice 
president, Campbell-Ewald . . . Ar- 
thur E. Petersen, to vice president, 
Peitscher, Janda Associates, from 
Vance Publishing. 

More about personnel: Helen 
Gordon, appointed creative director, 
Liller, Neal, Battle & Lindsey, Atlanta 
. . . David Wedeck appointed asso- 
ciate media director and Richard 
Gershon named assistant media di- 
rector, B&B . . . Lois Henriksen, 
named media director, Stone & Sim- 
ons, Detroit . . . Jack M. Bristow, 
appointed account supervisor Sheaffer 
Pen, BBDO . . . John H. Fogarty, 
named manager, BBDO, Cleveland . . . 
Mareus E. Smith, named planning 
director, Mid American Advertising 
. . . Paul D. Barker, to business 
development director, S. J. Kossack 
. . . Elizabeth Mitchell, appointed 
media buyer for Rexall, BBDO, Los 
Angeles . . . David B. Smart and 
Philip P. Young, Jr. named ac- 
count executives, NL&B . . . Neal 
Waldman, to Robert Hass, as ac- 
count executive . . . Bates Hall, 
named account executive, DCS&S . . . 
David A. Clitter, to account execu- 
tive, Kae Algyer Advertising . . . 
Henry Hager, Glen Gardiner, 
Robert Wilkinson and William 
Davidson to MacManus, John & 
Adams . . . Lawrence A. Nelson to 
assistant account executive Mac- 
Manus, John & Adams. 



The newsletter is becoming an 
increasingly important media for 
commercials producers in which 
they can talk about their clients 
and services. 

Latest producer to come out with a 
monthly newsletter is Videotape 
Productions of New York with a 
four page booklet called Tape Meas- 
ures, first published in July. 

Another producer with a newsletter 
is HFH Productions which specializes 
in animation comment. 

Ampex also covers station-pro- 
duced tape commercials in its month- 
ly newsletter. 

Sales: CNP's Jim Backus Show to 
Carting's in 51 markets plus station 



sales to KNXT, Los Angeles: WW 
TV, Chicago, and WABC-TV, I 
York . . . Jax Beer adds Tulsa, \X i 
ta Falls, Beaumont, Jackson, 
Monroe to its line-up for Screen C< 
Manhunt . . . Screen Gems' Two Ft 
West to Utica Club beer in Syrac 
Utica, Albany, Plattsburgh, and H 
hamton . . . Pacific Gas & Elec 
(BBDO) returns to KRON-TV, 
Francisco in Ziv-UA's Tombst 
Territory . . . UAA individual 
tures as special programing sold 
WFGA-TV, Jacksonville; WTVJ. 
ami; KTBS-TV, Shreveport; KH1 
Honolulu; KODE-TV, Joplin; KSj 
TV, Shreveport; KCOP, Los Ang« 
WREX-TV, Rockford; WHO-TV. I 
Moines; WFMB-TV, Indianap* 
KTVO, Ottuma, and KAKE-i 
Wichita. 

More sales: Official Films' Gn 
Headlines of the Century to KR 
TV. Los Angeles; WBFM-TV, Ind 
apolis; WXYZ-TV, Detroit; WR 
TV, Rochester; KONO-TV, San 
tonio; KCRA-TV, Sacran 
WTVJ, Miami; WGN-TV, Chic* 
WJZ-TV. Baltimore; WBZ-TV, 
ton; KYW-TV, Cleveland; WF] 
Youngstown; KDKA-TV, Pittsbur 
WFBC-TV, Greenville; WMCT- 
Memphis; KELP-TV, El Ps 
KTRK-TV, Houston; KSL-TV, 
Lake City; KOMO-TV, Seatt 
KTVK, Phoenix, and KLAS-TV. 
Vegas . . . Ziv-UA's second yea 
Lock Up, now in 173 markets 
Kroger (Campbell-Mithun) onWH 
TV, Louisville; WDAF-TV, Kai 
City; KSD-TV, St. Louis, and WL 
TV, Lexington. Also Iowa Ele( 
(Ambro) on WOI-TV, Des Moil 
Molson's (MacLaren) on WGR- 
Buffalo; and WCNY-TV, Waterto 
Miles on KNXT, Los Angeles; Bl 
woods Dunlop Tire on WRAL- 
Raleigh; Texas State Optical 
KFDM-TV, Beaumont; plus stat 
WWLO-TV. New Orleans; KMID- 
Midland; KVIQ-TV, Eureka; KV 
TV, Redding; WJBF, Augu 
WLOS-TV,Asheville; KVOS-TV. I 
ingham; KELO-TV, Sioux Ti 
KFSD-TV, San Diego; KGNC- 
Amarillo, and WFMJ-TV, Youi 
town. 

Tape: RAC tv tape recorders 1 
been delivered to date to the foil 
ing U. S. broadcasters and produo 
Graphic Pictures, Chicago ( 
KSTP-TV. St. Paul (2); Wlv 



(.2 



1 AUGUST II 



\ 

Ivansville, Indiana; Mark Armistead, 
lolIvHood (2); WJXT, Jackson- 
lle; KOCO-TV, Oklahoma City; 
PSBT-TV. South Bend; KTHV-TV, 
ittle Rock; WMAR-TV, Baltimore; 
FSB-TV, Atlanta (2) ; Reeves Sound 
raft, Danbury, Conn.; KWTV, Ok- 
ihoma City; KFSD-TV, San Diego; 
TUL-TV, Tulsa; KOB-TV, Albu- 
uerque; KXLY. Spokane; WCHS- 
V, Charleston; WHDH-TV, Boston 
2); WAVY-TV, Portsmouth 
PHO-TV. Phoenix; WTSN-TV, Mil 
aukee (2); KBTV, Denver (2) 
eeves Sound Studio. N. Y. 1 8) 
/TOP-TV. Washington. D. C. (2) 
TBC-TV. Austin, Texas; WTMJ 

IV, Milwaukee; KHQ-TV. Spokane 
,/FIL-TV, Philadelphia; WFBM-TV 
lidianapolis (2) ; WTVR. Richmond 

BAL-TV. Baltimore; WTRF-TV 
heeling; WBAP-TV. Fort Worth, 
id NBC (12). 

We tape news: Delivery of 23 
ideotape recorders, including 13 
■ U. S. stations and four to produc- 
s, brings world delivery total to 
53. Stations include WAST-TV, Al- 
iny; KTLA, Los Angeles; KOMU- 

V, Columbia; WRBL-TV. Colum- 
WTVJ, Miami 12): KYW-TV, 

leveland; WTHS-TV. Miami: 
[LOS-TV, Asheville (2); WPTA- 
I Roanoke; KARK-TV, Little 
jock, and KIMA-TV, Yakima, Wash- 
Igton. Four machines went to Sports 
?twork, N.Y.C. . . . Giantview Gen- 
>al Television Network has ac- 
lired control of Tapes Unlimited, 
New ^ ork producer. 

rograms and production: ABC 

1ms' three new additions to syndi- 
;,tion availabilities are John Gun- 
, ers High Road, Exclusive!, and 

\mnterthrust . . . Goodson Todman 

'11 have the initial film of Las Vegas 

ailable in 90 days. 

i in 1 1 w rrial.-: Henne and Kauf- 

an, 244 Madison Avenue, N. Y., 
pointed sales representatives of 
Jix the Cat Creations' commercial 
rtoon division . . . Abe Levitow 
ipointed associate producer and su- 
(rvision director for I PA pictures 
j . Music Makers completed work 
commercials for American Beer 
|» VanSant Dugdale . . . William 
| Cornish joined sales and produc- 
|'ii staff of tv film commercial de- 
Irtment. Sarra. 



Promotion : CNP's Pony Express is 
coordinating its promotions with the 
centennial celebrations thi< week. 

International sales: ITC's Danger 
Man to the CBC English network for 
Labatt's I J. Walter Thompson) and 
Interpol Calling to the CBC French 
network . . . Ziv-UA shows sold 
through International Television 
Programs (ITP) as follows: 12 
programs to Televisora de Costa 
Rica; seven to Television Savadorena, 
El Salvador; four to Panemena de 
Radiodifusion, Panama; four to Ra- 
dio HIN, Dominican Republic; 10 to 
NATEC for Curacao. Aruba, and 
Port-Au-Prince telecast ; three to Tele- 
vision del Norte, Monterrey; for all 
the rest of Mexico, 12 shows to Tele- 
sistima Mexicana; Target to Shell Oil 
and Bat Masterson to Kellogg and 
Fresh Milk Cooperative, in Puerto 
Rico ; 10 programs to Television Pan 
Americana, Lima; two to Zuriguel 
Associates, C.A., Caracas; one to 
Propaganda Epoca, Bogota; 10 to 
Radio Rio Ltda, Brazil (dubbed into 
Portuguese) ; also, five programs to 
Kansai Television Broadcasting, Den- 
tsu Advertising or JOEX-TV, Tokyo, 
Japan; five to ATV. Sydney, and 
GTV, Melbourne; five toTVW Ltd., 
Perth; one to Queensland Television 
Ltd., Brisbane; additionally, pro- 
grams were sold to Oy Mainas Tauch- 
er, Helsingfors, Finland; Degeto, 
Frankfurt, Germany; Television Suis- 
se; Vllamse Televise. Belgium; Movie- 
record, Madrid; Philipps Portugesa. 
Portugal, and Arabian American Oil 
Company. Iran; others were 16 sales 
to Canadian stations in Yorkton. 
Quebec, Halifax. St. John. Vancouver, 
and Moncton. 

Strictly personnel: Ray Junkin, 
president. Harold Hackett, v. p.. 
Walter Smith, v.p.. and Jack An- 
derson, secretary, are the officers of 
newly-formed Program Sales, Inc., 
15 E. 48th St., N. Y. . . . James 
Bogans named syndication traffic 
manager of Screen Gems . . . Irving 
Lichtenstein to special events activi- 
ties and promotional merchandising 
supervisor of NTA. 



NETWORKS 



ABC Radio proposes to add a 
new feature to its programing 
come 3 October: 55 minutes a 



week of 90-second vignettes deal- 
ing with a wide assortment of 
themes. 

The taped bits will be sprinkled be- 
tween 1-5 p.m. Monday through Fri- 
day. 

Affiliates will be free to spot them 
anywhere they wish during the after- 
noon. Some of them may be sold for 
local sponsorship. 

Agencies will be urged to fit the 
product to the vignette. For instance, 
if a vignette deals with cooking a 
food would make a nifty companion. 

The price per block of nine vig- 
nettes per week across the board will 
soon be available to prospects. 

Title of the vignettes: Flair. 

ABC TV expressed confidence 
last week that it would be able to 
get Queen for a Day started on 
its network 5 September. 

In other words, the show's alliance 
with NBC TV would end as of 2 
September. 

NBC has been claiming that 
Queen's commitment is binding 
through January. 

NBC TV will let its affiliates know 
this week what four nighttime 
programs are available to them 
for the sale of local minutes this 
fall. 

The likely foursome: Riverboat, 
The Outlaws, Michael Shayne and 
Laramie. 

They're all subject to recall if the 
time is sold by the network. 

Here are TvB's estimated expen- 
ditures for the top 10 brand ad- 
vertisers in network tv during 
May, followed by top 10 company 
advertisers, as compiled bv LNA- 
BAR: 

RANK BRAND GROSS TIME COSTS 

1. Anacin Tablets S821.004 

2. Texaco, Inc., General 
Promotion 671,953 

3. Dristan 648,779 

4. Ford Passenger Cars 646,146 

5. Pall Mall Cigarettes 609,788 

6. Phillies Cigars 597,644 

7. Bayer Aspirin Tablets 596.698 

8. Winston Cigarettes 497,356 

9. Camel Cigarettes 477,863 
10. Tide 469,044 

RANK COMPANY GROSS TIME COSTS 

1. P&G Co. 83,953,704 

2. American Home 

Products Corp. 2,784,201 

3. Lever Brothers Co. 2,182,396 



JONSOR 

L 



• 1 AUGUST 1960 



4. General Motors Corp. 2,043,083 

5. Colgate-Palmolive Co. L,786,932 

6. General Foods Corp. 1.705,306 

7. Sterling Drug, Inc. 1.394,469 

8. R. J. Reynolds 

Tobacco Co. 1,346,950 

9. Ford Motor Co. 1,266,694 
10. Texaco. Inc. 1,018,110 

Net tv sales: The Miss America 
Pageant, a two-hour special on CBS 
TV, 10 September will be sponsored 
by Phileo Corp., Toni Co., and 
Oldsmobile; Phileo will sponsor 
coverage of the parade . . . Warner- 
Lambert Products Division bought 
a participation in NBC TV's River- 
boat. 

Thisa 'n' data: Mutual begs leave 
to say its sale of the convention- 
election package to Liggett & Myers 
was according to set policy of selling 
only 80% and with no discounts . . . 
ABC TV distributing to the trade 
presentation gavels with the printed 
legend "ABC Daytime — Judged Your 
Best Buy" . . . CBS plans to erect 
a new headquarters building in mid- 
town New York. 

New Mutual affiliates: KDUB, Lub- 
bock, Texas; WEEP, Pittsburgh; 
WHBO. Tampa; KjOE, Shreveport; 
KOKX, Keokuk, Iowa; WGEA, Ge- 
neva, Ala.; WPTX, Lexington Park, 
Md.; WMSR, Manchester, Tenn.; 
WEAT, West Palm Beach. 

Financial report: AB-PT reports 
estimated net operating profit at 
$5,653,000 or $1.35 a share, an in- 
crease of 45% over the $3,886,000 or 
90<* a share for the 1959 first six 
month period. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



A 15— t;ii ion network has been 
formed to facilitate the handling 
of spot radio sales in the state of 
Oregon. 

Known as the Big-O, it includes 
these stations: KGRL, Bend; KURY, 
Brookings; KYNG, Coos Bay; KFLY, 
Corvallis; KORE, Eugene; KAJO, 
Grants Pass; KLAD. Klamath Falls; 
KMCM, McMinnville; KBOY, Med- 
ford: KNPT, Newport; KKID, Pend- 
leton; KQEN, Roseburg; KSLM, 
Salem; KODL, The Dalles; KTIL, 
I illamook. 

TheTri-Marl and Jefferson Empire 



stations will continue to be sold in 
two or three-station combinations. 

Rep appointments — s t a t i o n s : 

WALB-TV, Albany, Ga., and WJHG- 
TV, Panama City, Fla., to Venard, 
Kin to n I & McConnell for national 
representation . . . WTOD, Toledo, 
and WTRX. Flint, to Broadcast 
Time Sales as national representa- 
tive . . . KRKO, Everett, Wash., 
KMO, Tacoma. and KOL, Seattle to 
H-R. 

New company: New England Spot 
Sales, a rep firm to cover that re- 
gion's radio and tv stations primarily, 
has been opened with offices in the 
Statler Building in Boston. Charles 
Bell, Jr. will head the firm. 

Expanding: PGW has enlarged its 
New York facilities by taking addi- 
tional space at 250 Park Avenue. 

Rep appointments — personnel : 
Neil Harold, named director of sales 
research, CBS Radio Spot Sales, N.Y. 
. . . Frank Beasley, transferred to 
N.Y. office, CBS TV Spot Sales as ac- 
count executive. 



TV STATIONS 



TvB is distributing a new booklet 
titled A Network of Facts about 
Daytime Television. 
Some highlights of the presentation: 

• Cost per thousand homes reached 
by network daytime tv programs has 
declined 13.4% in the past five years. 

• More than half of all new network 
advertisers in 1959 were new adver- 
tisers using daytime. 

• 72 advertisers using daytime net- 
work tv came from 18 different prod- 
uct catagories. 

• In the past five years, tv homes 
increased Id' ; . while tv homes watch- 
in- daytime increased 57%. 

• Total number of daytime home 
viewing hours in 1960 was 106,220,- 
000 a day with the average tv home 
spending two hours and 21 minutes 
wati liin- daytime tv every day. 

• Average network weekday daytime 
program reaches 3,489,000 homes 
compared with 3,254,000 homes in 
1956. 

Ideas at work: 

• Zooom: WBRZ. Baton Rouge, 

and the Downtown Exchange club arc 






co-sponsoring Sky-O-Rama, an Air 
Force exhibition, in cooperation with! 
the U. S. Department of Defense. 
• No burglars here: WNDU-TV, 

South Bend, in a street promotion for 
the B. K. Theaters, invited people t 
have a try at safe-cracking. The prize, 
100 silver dollars, was to go to charih 
if the safe was not cracked withir 
certain period of time. The charit) 
prospered, for over 5,000 of the hoi 
est citizenry tried, but to no avail. 

Thisa 'n' data: WSTV-TV, SteuL 
enville-Wheeling, Ohio, sponsored 
third annual Teen Princess contest 
WISN-TV, Milwaukee, hosted 
luncheon for 150 advertiser, agenc 
and public relations personnel to pr< 
mote its new hour-long daytime sh< 
Open House on 12 . . . KTTV, Lo« 
Angeles, will have exclusive coveragi 
of the International Beauty Congre^ 
and plan for more than 15 hours oj 
program time . . . Gerity Broadcast 
ing Company, Michigan, presentei 
Flint Junior College with $54,00! 
worth of tv equipment . . . Nielsoi 
has signed a five-year contract 
the Nihon Television Network Corp 
of Tokyo, making Japan the 13l 
country in which the researcher's serv 
ices are available . . . Financial re 
port : Storer Broadcasting 
report for the second quarter of 19(>( 
showed an increase of over 11 % sab 
of time over the same period for 19. 
and an increase in net income froi 
$1.10 to $1.14 per share . . . WBBM 
TV, Chicago, will have seven consgi l 
tive weeks coverage of the Chicagi 
Bears. 

Sponsored tv special on the loca 
front: / See Chicago, an hour-Ion 
show about the Chicago area, will b 
aired during prime evening time < 
WBBM-TV, with Illinois Bell (Ayer 
as sponsor. 

Kudos: Raymond W. Welpotl 

Jr., NBC v.p. and general manager c 
WRCV-AM-FM, Philadelphia, name 
radio-tv chairman for the Unite 
Fund Torch Drive for the second yei 
. . . Transcontinent TV's west coai 
stations — KFMB-AM-FM-TV an 
KERO-TV — have received top recoj 
nition for their national trade publl 
cation ads from the Art Direi 
Club of Los Angeles . . . KFDM-T^ 
Beaumont, won the Honor \wa 
the best trade paper single ad i 
Advertising Club of Beaumont Sea nfl 



64 



SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 19» 



iual Ad Awards Contest. 

the personnel front: Allyn 
Marsh, to v. p. in charge of new 
mess at U. S. Tele-Service, from 
'■> Radio Sales . . . Richard E. 
■d, to sales manager. WLW-C, Co- 
bus . . . C. H. Topmiller, to gen- 
manager, WLBW-TV, Miami . . . 
• ma- A. Welstead, to v.p. and 
«tor of general sales. WCKY-TV- 
, Cincinnati . . . Robert E. Met- 
te, appointed managing director, 
L.DW-TV, Augusta . . . George R. 
I, named station business manager, 
,EW-TV. New York . . . Jack 
in, appointed national sales co- 
inator. KYW-TV, Cleveland . . . 
Bruce Copeland, named admini- 
itive assistant to the managing di- 
:or, WIS-TV, Columbia . . . Larry 
berts, to account executive. 
NT-TV. Seattle . . . Frank Doyle, 
lews director, KOCO-TV, Oklaho- 
City. 



I r RADIO STATIONS 



:as at work: 

jBeauty-minded : KAKC, Tulsa, 
jigain sponsoring the winning Miss 
Isa contestant. For the past two 
rs the station-sponsored Miss Tulsa 
> gained the Miss Oklahoma crown 
\ competed in the Miss America 
,geant. Five station-chartered busses 
ry listeners to the pageant with 
jidwiches and beverages served en- 



lte. 

Ah sweet mystery: Listeners of 
IL, St. Louis, were recently in- 
ved in a tense mvsterious contest. 
*e reason: "I Love a Mystery 
tiek." The promotion : audience had 

unravel three mysteries — a voice, 
le, and sound. Winners received 
00. 

On the road: WPDQ, Jackson- 
le, to help make the 4 July weekend 
*afe one, sponsored an intensified 
•hour safety campaign. Helicopters, 
d patrol cars kept constant track 

all road conditions and relayed 
J information to the studio where 
was broadcast. State and local law 
forcement officers, Marine and 
ivy pilots, and station men cooper- 
ed in this public service effort. The 
Hilt: not one major accident was 
:orded during the weekend. 

jiisa V data: KABC, Los Angeles, 
roducing a new programing concept 



offering quite a number of personali- 
ties anchored around its news and 
commentary set-up . . . WERE, 
Cleveland, ran its third annual mil- 
lion dollar sports car Autorama . . . 
Named chairmen in Broadcast Pio- 
neers: Eli Harris, membership; 
Ireene Wicker, program; May 
Singhi Breen, entertainment ; 
Dorothy Gordon, special projects; 
Henrietta Harrison and Bob 
Queen, reception; Bernard Piatt, 
publicity; Peggy Stone, house; Wil- 
liam Hedges, Frank Pellegrin, 
Frank Silvernail, Jeff Sparks, and 
M. H. Shapiro, advisory committee 
... At Colorado Broadcasters Asso- 
ciation : Ed Kapoke elected president 
of the board of directors; Abbott 
Tessman, to v.p.; Clayton Brace, 
to secretary-treasurer. 

Station acquisition: WPCT, Put- 
nam, Conn., purchased by Herbert C. 
Rise from Israel Putnam Broadcast- 
ing Co. for $100,100. Broker was 
Paul H. Chapman. 



Kudos: CKLW-AM-TV, Detroit, 
cited by the city's police department 



for "valuable contributions towards 
public safety" . . . KBIG, Catalina, 
winner in the large station category 
of the nationwide competition to pro- 
mote the 1960 Radio Free Europe 
Truth Message program . . . WERE, 
Cleveland, recipient of a Public In- 
terest Award from the National Safety 
Council . . . WMGM, New York, 
given an Award of Service to Youth 
by the Brownsville Boys Club . . . 
John E. Davis, KBIM, Roswell, 
N. M., announcer, made an honorary 
citizen of Capitan, for his help in 
keeping parents informed as changes 
of school hours occured due to 
weather conditions. 



Station staffers: Harold Sund- 
berg, appointed general manager, 
WMBD-AM-FM-TV, Peoria ... Ed- 
win J. Stevens, named v.p. of pro- 
graming and promotion, Cleveland 
Broadcasting . . . Jeffrey P. Kuklin, 
to station manager, WNCN, New York 
. . . Phil J. Martinez, appointed 
commercial manager, KBCO-FM, San 
Francisco . . . Shirley P. Simpson, 
to sales staff, KPAM-KPFM, Port- 
land. ^ 



In Roanoke in '60 
the Selling Signal 

is Seven... 

You won't get rich selling bongo 
drums in the Roanoke Television 
Market, but there are nearly 
2,000,000 people who are willing 
and able to help you turn a neat 
profit on foodstuffs, toiletries, 
pharmaceuticals, gasoline, house- 
hold products and other items. 

The magic number for reaching 
these heavy-spending, non-Calypso 
folks is seven. In Roanoke, seven is 
WDBJ-TV . . . which will beat the 
drum for your product in over 
400,000 television homes of Vir- 
ginia, N. Carolina and W. Va. 

WDBJ-TV has maximum power, 
highest tower, superior service and 
programming ... to help you sell 
like sixty on seven. 




Roanoke, Virginia 




ONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 




TopcoTEKVGE 



BOMDS COVERAGE 



BRATTLEB0RO,VT. 
GRE£NFIELP,MASS., KEENE.N.H- 
♦ G.Pi 



Tv and radio 
NE KEM 



■HM| 
1 






tising. Previously he 



Terry R. Rice has assumed his duties a 
advertising manager of A.S.R. Products, 
division of Philip Morris. He will be 
charge of all advertising for Gem Razor! 
and blades. Pal Injector and its blades anJ 
Supreme products. Rice had been associ 
ated with Borden Milk and Ice Cream G 
for the past eight and one half years an<j 
left as assistant director of national adverj 
held the positions of national advertising 



manager for all media and air media for the dairy company! 



Robert F. Agne has been named market- 
ing research director at Harold Cabot & 
Co., Boston. His responsibilities will in- 
clude both the planning and conducting of 
marketing research projects for the agency 
and client companies. Agne was senior 
marketing analyst at Gillette Safety Razor 
Co. before joining the advertising agency, 
and prior to that manager of market re- 
search for Sealright-Oswego Falls Corp. He served as chairman 01 
the A.M. A. committee which revised the chapter operation manual 



It 



Richard Beesemyer has joined KNXT 

^■PPQk Los Angeles, as sales manager. He come 

Jf* ' m to the station from CBS Spot Sales, Nei 

^L^ *<*•»* * York. This is a newly created positioi 

*v which is designed to offer greater service 

\Skr'Jl^^^ on the sales management level. Beesemyel 

1^1 served with KNXT from 1956 to 1958 i 

^H& M& account executive and then became as 

^^^* sociated with the Chicago office of CBS 

Spot Sales. Prior to his first affiliation with KNXT, the new sale 

manager was a member of the KHJ-TV, Los Angeles, sales staff 

Frank Brill has been appointed manager 
of the New York office of MCA TV Film 
Syndication Division. He will report to 
David Sutton, vice president of the divi- 
sion. Brill moves into his new post after 
five years as an account executive with 
MCA. Prior to this association, he was 
with United Television Programs as an ac- 
count executive in the sales department. 
The new manager began his career as a performer, and later becamfl 
an account buyer for a company which produced tv short subjects! 

SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 196(1 




WHAT HAPPENS 
WHEN A NATION 
SPENDS MORE 

ON GAMBLING 
THAN IT SPENDS FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION ? 



If you can find any Romans around, ask them. They lived 
ipretty high on the hog in their day. That is, until some 
serious-minded neighbors from up North moved in. The 
rest is ancient history. 

You'd think their fate would have taught us a lesson. 
Yet today we Americans spend twenty billion dollars a 
'year for legalized gambling, while we spend a niggardly 
'four-and-a-half billion for higher education. Think of 
it! Over four times as much! We also spend six-and-a- 
half billion dollars a year for tobacco, nine billion dol- 
lars for alcoholic beverages, and billions more on other 
non-essentials. 

Can't we read the handwriting on the wall ? 
Our very survival depends on the ability of our colleges 
and universities to continue to turn out thinking men 
and women. Yet today many of these fine institutions are 
hard put to make ends meet. Faculty salaries, generally, 
are so low that qualified teachers are leaving the campus 
in alarming numbers for better-paying jobs elsewhere. 



In the face of this frightening trend, experts estimate 
that by 1970 college applications will have doubled. 
If we are to keep our place among the leading nations of 
the world, we must do something about this grim situa- 
tion before it is too late. The tuition usually paid by a 
college student covers less than half the actual cost of 
his education. The balance must somehow be made up 
by the institution. To meet this deficit even the most 
heavily endowed colleges and universities have to de- 
pend upon the generosity of alumni and public spirited 
citizens. In other words, they depend upon you. 
For the sake of our country and our children, won't you 
do your part? Support the college of your choice today. 
Help it to prepare to meet the challenge of tomorrow. The 
rewards will be greater than you think. 



It's important for you to know what the impending college crisis 
means to you. Write for a free booklet to HIGHER EDUCATION, 
Box 36, Times Square Station, New York 36, New York. 



W 



Sponsored as a public service 
in co-operation with The Council for Financial Aid to Education 



EDUCATION 



'PONSOR • 1 AUGUST 1960 



67 




frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Why cant timebuyers establish a better rapport with station operators and 
their representatives? asks Robert W . Ferguson, executive vice president and 
general manager, WTRF-TV, Wheeling, West Virginia. Concentrating spe- 
cifically on the area of market research, Ferguson outlines the valuable 
types of market statistics and distribution and sales information which sta- 
tion people provide buyers who haven t the time for personal visits, but who 
are anxious to make maximum contributions to their clients' campaigns. 

WHAT VALUE MARKET DATA? 

\Jne of the areas in which I feel there could be greater We realize that timebuyers are responsible for buying 

mutual understanding between station operators, their reps, a number of markets and it is specifically for this reas 




and the timebuyers with whom they deal is market research. 
Of course the obvious way for agency people to check the 
validity of market claims is through fact-finding visits. 
Most station operators welcome such market tours and I'm 
an advocate of this direct "on-the-scene" type of contact. 
It's been my experience that the agency people who take 
time and trouble to personally check markets and stations 
are the most knowledgeable ones. Visits to border or tri- 



that we try to provide documented information of 
make-up of our market and the station's role in that mark! 
Obviously, when we make a pitch for schedules in a mi 
ket we put up our finest front. But this is a front that 
. based on facts and figures and can be readily checked. I 
sure that when an ad agency makes a bid for new bu 
ness it parades its finest presentations, sparkling with t 
best ideas its creative personnel can dream up. But 1 



state markets are even more important since often sales basic substance of both presentations is the ability to 



and distribution figures are not complete because of being 
credited to different or several regional offices. 

Understanding of the make-up of the various markets 
around the country is vital to timebuyers. We realize that 
a timebuyer, who has to buy schedules in 200-or-so mar- 
kets, cannot be completely familiar with all of them. So 
station managers and their representatives devote a great 
deal of time to working up material on their markets to 
simplify the problems of the ad agency timebuyers. 

But for some reason not readily fathomed, it seems that, 
rather than some agency people appreciating the efforts of 
the various station people for their contributions, a great 
deal of the market information supplied by these people is 
looked on with suspicion. 



liver on a steady, continuing program. 

What we try to provide for the agency buyers is a ti 
saving device. We and our reps know the market; we kn 
programing, the viewing audience, the audience breakdo 
in its various forms, the type of advertising that is ri; 
for various viewers. Consequently, we can offer the til 
buyer our knowledge and judgment and help him nii 
maximum contributions to his client's campaign. 

Perhaps agency timebuyers, in the pressure of their j 
ieel that stations submit too much material too oft 
Again, this is likely a case of the conscientious station 
erator trying to provide the timebuyers with what they i 
is important data for him. Certainly stations do not go 
the expense of working out complicated brochures, stati 



Yet we station operators and the station reps working cal charts and other market facts because they 



for us spend a great deal of time, money, and effort in com- 
piling brochures, market statistics and other pertinent ma- 
terial specifically In provide agency personnel with up-to- 
the-minute data on our markets. 

Granted, the agency people don't have to use the infor- 
mation we submit, but they should have market data which 
will provide validated coverage claims, accurate tv homes 
served information, audience buying power in the market, 
and distribution and sales information which should be 
absolutel) essential knowledge for any timebuyer before 

making a deci.-ion I'm In- i lient. 



nothing else to do. The station operator and his stat 
rep are the pulse of what is happening in each markei. 
is the trend they are trying to observe and report to 
timebuyer so that in turn he can correlate the changes i 
the requirements needed for his particular client and pi 
uct in various markets. 

There should be a rapport between station operators 
their reps and the timebuyers concerning market study 
make-up which I hope will eventually emerge on a hi 
of belief, trust and a mutual understanding of mut 
problems. 



68 



1 AUGUST < M 



HARMS 

Continued from page 39) 

So enthused are advertising ofli- 
als with the latest upward swing in 
harms Candy sales, plans are being 
mdered to extend their campaign to 
her markets. 

The $200,000 budget spent in radio 
jring the past year will be upped by 
>me $50,000 come fall, according to 
lother company vice-president, How- 

d A. Heinsius. 

Other media are also being studied 
I the expanded program. "Possibly 
'levision," says Heinsius who reveals 

it the "I Want Some Charms" song 
ill be heard on radio stations in the 

itroit and Los Angeles locales in the 
jry near future. 

The radio stations currently shar- 
ig in the promotion of the Charms 
impaign are WPEN and WFIL in 
hiladelphia; WEEI. Boston; WBBN, 
hicago and WNEW, WMGM, and 
/OR in New York City. Although 
jots are bought "across the board," 

insure a broad audience, extra era- 
basis is placed on stations with a 
reater share of homemaker listeners 
Jn the popular theory that women do 
le family shopping. 

1 In the metropolitan area, for in- 
ance, the bulk of the advertising 
loney went to WOR — for this rea- 
i>n. Here, the spot schedule rotated 
: ti a four-week heavy saturation of 

2 announcements per week — alter- 
ating with a four-week light sched- 
ule of seven per week. This regimen 
,; observed without a break through- 
ut the year. Time slots on other ra- 
io stations were bought in 13-week 
ycles with an average of 16 to 18 
oots a week. 

In all stations the commercial sell 
I the same with the exception of Chi- 
Bgo where the additional charge for 
ire-recorded e.t.'s forced the adver- 
sers to seek another approach, 
itere. radio personalities with a flair 
>r the light touch are sought in an 
|ffort to present a sparkling "live" 
lersion of the written copy. In these 
pmmercials. the revised copy stressed 
jie flavor and low calorie content of 
fie product. 
Merchandising also figures promi- 
entl\ in the success of the campaign, 
^cording to the advertiser. Addi- 
lonal sales were registered in places 
here stations tied-in attractive dis- 
jlay baskets of the packaged confec- 
in area supermarkets. ^ 



DAYTIME NET TV 

l Continued from page 37 I 

morning 5. Id 1,000 have watched; be- 
tween 9 a.m. and noon 12,964,000. 
The morning tv audience total is 14,- 
796,000 women viewing. 

In the afternoon, 26,744,000 wom- 
en watch — 16,358,000 between noon 
and 2 p.m., 15,302,000 between 2 and 
4 p.m., and 17,030,000 between 4 and 
6 p.m. The total daily audience in- 
cludes, therefore, 29,251,000 different 
women, but they represent only 
37.3% of all persons viewing televi- 
sion at these times. The rest are men 
(18.8%), children (32%) and teen- 
agers (11.9%). 

Of particular interest to advertisers 
in view of this large audience are the 
figures on rates. The cost-per-telecast 
of the average weekday network 
quarter-hour program has increased 
only 5.8% since 1956, from $15,400 
to $16,300, and represents a decrease 
in cost since 1958 ($19,600). 

TvB has issued another presenta- 
tion, "The Woman in Your Life . . . 
A Daytime Rendezvous," as a com- 
panion piece to the "Network of 
Facts." It is designed to show adver- 
tisers "why national advertisers in- 
vested a record $426,600,000 in day- 
time tv in 1959 . . . why daytime 
viewers and the households they man- 
age represent an important market 
for almost every product . . . why 
there is more opportunity for sales 
productivity and advertising economy 
today in daytime television than ever 
before." 

The presentation notes that women 
are the chief influence in household 
purchases, accounting for the final 
sales decision in over 98% of the pur- 
chases of children's apparel, and are 
consulted on more than 68% of the 
neckties, shirts, shoes, socks, pajamas, 
underwear, and handkerchiefs men 
decide to buy. Women influence 92% 
of all grocery purchases, and have 
much to say in over 75% of car pur- 
chases more than eight out of 10 drive 
cars, (as many women as men visit 
service stations). 

Women, in more than nine out of 
10 cases, make the actual decision to 
purchase bathroom supplies, blankets, 
carpets, coffee, furniture, and soap. 
They are a strong factor in at least 
80% of the sales of soft drinks, 
clocks, electrical appliances, motion 
picture tickets, and toys. 

"The woman in your life," TvB 



tells prospective advertisers, is one of 
a group who spends $160 billion a 
years in goods and services, controls 
65% of the nation's private wealth, 
and earns $45 billion a year. 

As TvB adds up all the figures, 
50.4% of all Americans over four 
view daytime tv. That's 78,361,000 
different persons, or "more people 
than live in Great Britain, France or 
Germany, viewing just daytime tele- 



PONSOR 



1 AUGUST 1960 



FLYING A 

(Continued from page 35) 

from the rugged-looking guy and 
snuggling, euphoric woman who drive 
into the Flying A station to gas up 
their convertible and zoom off down 
the road. At that point the quality 
angle takes over and the screen is 
filled with footage of the gigantic, 
new Flying A refinery in Delaware, 
said to be the most advanced in the 
world. 

The radio commercials are all e.t.'s 
except for "Melody Mileage" and 
those spots put on by local dealers, 
for which the company sends copy to 
be delivered live. The e.t.'s open with 
the brief jingle, "The man with drive 
gets more power with new Flying A," 
belted out by a vocal group. Then the 
announcer moves in and explains 
how, thanks to the new refinery, Fly- 
ing A has come up with a "super- 
premium gas that doesn't cost extra." 
Or, if regular gas is preferred, Flying 
A has the highest octane of all, the 
announcer adds. 

At a series of "Soaring Sixties" 
sales meetings, Tidewater re-intro- 
duced its dealers to the man with 
drive and filled them in on this year's 
bigger-than-ever campaign. A special 
film was presented dramatizing the 
advertising, marketing, and sales pro- 
motions in the offing. The film's tv 
section consists of a skit called "The 
Saga of Hapless Harry." 

It depicts a dejected voung man 
hanging up his telephone after being 
turned down for a date. Then he 
chances to look at his tv screen while 
a Flying A commercial is in progress. 
He sees the man with drive, con- 
tented female at his side, and cheers 
up immediately. Chest expanded, 
muscle flexed, he's ready to take 
off for the Flying A station, and 
victory. ^ 

69 






SPONSOR 



How many.neglected food markets? 

Are the distribution patterns of the big food chain- un- 
fairly penalizing many important radio/tv markets? 

According to information reaching sponsor recently a 
number of broadcaster? are becoming increasingly alarmed 
by the practice of such grocery giants as A&P and Kroger in 
crediting all sales to the distribution point rather than the 
point-of-sale city. 

Radio/tv men in Wheeling. W e-t Virginia, and Mobile. 
Alabama, to name but two examples, insist they're getting the 
short end of the advertising -tick, because sales in their mar- 
kets are being credited to outside purchasing centers. 

How prevalent is this practice? How many injustices are 
caused by it? sponsor proposes to make and publish a thor- 
ough study of the problem. Meanwhile, we'll welcome com- 
ments from stations, agencies, and advertisers about this 
troublesome question. 

Local radio at the Conventions 

Our congratulations for enlightened and "localized*" radio 
coverage of the political Conventions at Los Angeles and 
Chicago go to a whole host of stations and station groups. 

In terms of building local community interest in these 
national political gatherings, radio ha? never done as fine a 
job. 

The Convention crews of Westinghouse Broadcasting. Cor- 
inthian. Taft. Triangle, and RKO groups brought valuable 
Convention .-idelight- to the people at home, and effectively 
supplemented radio network coverage. 

In addition, the special Convention coverage arranged for 
b\ Metropolitan, Meredith, Transcontinent, and many inde- 
pendent or individual stations provided a breadth and depth 
of reporting to the grass roots which exceeded even hr's well- 
publicized efforts. 

It was another striking example of radio's local vitality and 
-'■i\i.-«- at the community level. 

this we fight for: Constant efforts, es- 
pecially by broadcast stations, to simplify the 
paper work in radio ti spot, and thus enable 
agencies to bin the air media more easily. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Fox story: Received from Chicago th< 
following: "At the annual board meet- 
ing of Fox Deluxe Foods. Inc.. Wm. J. 
Fox. former president, was elevated V 
chairman of the board. Joseph J. Fo: 
was made president and Paul M. Fox 
vice president. Other officers were re 
elected as follows: Bert E. Fox 
Peter L. Fox. vice presidents, anc 
Gerald M. Zopp. secretary an> 
treasurer." Whazopp? 

More fox: The release continues 
"Fox. with headquarters in Chicag 
in the frozen foods business, primar: 
ly [processes] turkey and chicke 
dinners ..." Small wonder. 

Used car department: A usual! 
reliable SPONSOR staffer reports hear 
ing the following want ad on WYNJ 
Newark. "For sale. 1928 Model 
Ford, excellent running condition 
Priced to sell, take over payments. 
Creative programing division 
Y\ ARL-FM. Arlington. Va.. takes 
lead over other contenders with thi 
schedule: 

6 a.m. "Music to wake up to" 

7 a.m. "Music to eat breakfast to' 

8 a.m. "Music to send the kids t 

school with" 

9 a.m. "Music to dust by" 

10 a.m. "Music to wash to" 

11 a.m. "Music to iron by" 
Noon. "Music to eat lunch with" 

1 p.m. "Music to take a break with 

2 p.m. "Music to watch tv with" 

3 p.m. "Music to keep kids quiet aftei 

school with" 

4 p.m. "Waiting for father to con 

home music" 

5 p.m. "Music to cook dinner by" 

6 p.m. "Music to have dinner by" 

7 p.m. "Good music" 

8 p.m. "Other music" 

9 p.m. "Music to do homework witl 
1<I p.m. "Music for lovers" 
11 p.m. "Music for tired lovers" 
Call of the bard: Note from Phi 
Stone. CHUM. Toronto: "It used I 
be that boxers all turned to the resta j 
rant or night-club business. Now 
they're going into acting. Arch t 
Moore is in "Huckleberry Finn " 
Ingemar Johansson is in "All tl < 
Young Men" and Primo Camera C£i 
be -een in "Hercules Un-Chained 
They found out about it from th* 
urestlers. 

SPONSOR • 1 AUGUST 19' ( 



verywhere people are saying 




MULTI-CITY TV MARKET 




\L-TV 



< 'V 

is favored by viewers in Lancaster- Harrisburg- York, 

plus Gettysburg, Hanover, Lebanon, Chambersburg, 

Lewistown, Carlisle, Shamokin, Waynesboro, and many 

;*ading\ — \ other communities. Profit-proved for advertisers, this 

//^~J<X multi-city market is important to your selling plans. 

^LANCASTER 



WGAL-TV 

Lancaster, Pa. 

NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 

igo • Los Angeles • San Francisco 



a***"*"" 



THE RUSH IS ONI 

Also bought by 
• PET MILK in 7 mar" 
. MUTUAL FEDERAL SAVINC 
• ORTLIEB'S BEER • O.K. VAN 

• LINCOLN INCOME LIFE INS. 



with new orders every day! 




THE CASE OF TH El 

DANGEROU 




SPONSOR'S 1960-61 /14th annual edition 

part two 1 August 1960 



AIR MEDIA 



ASICS 



HE UNCOMMON DENOMINATOR OF 

SHAKESPEARE 

CAESAR 

BARNUM 

TEXAS GUINAN 

...WAS 

SALESMANSHIP 

Whatever their product . . . whatever their 

I , they knew how to sell it. And . . . whatever 

your product, whatever your service, 

KBAN STATIONS know how to sell it. 

BALABAN sells ... and people BUY! 

E BALABAN STATIONS ! John F. Box, Jr., Managing Director 
ost Experienced Flagship Stations in the Nation 

[/ST. LOUIS WRIT'MILWAUKEE / KBOX-DALLAS 

/ Sold Nationally by the Katz Agency, Inc. 




fictionally by Robert E. Eastman 4 Co., Inc. 



IMEBUYING BASICS 



KADIO BASICS 



TELEVISION BASICS 
FILM & TAPE BASICS 



TIMEBUYERS OF TH 




June PROCEEDINGS presents 
an exclusive report 
of world-wide significance 



List of contents: 



IRE is proud to present, in June 1960 Special 
Issue of PROCEEDINGS, the findings of a team of 
271 engineers who for 2 1 ' 2 years conducted studies of 
world-wide significance for the future of television. 
The Television Allocations Study Organization — 
formed by the TV industry in 1956 at the FCC's re- 
quest — has exhaustively analyzed the engineering 
factors underlying allocation of frequencies for VHF 
and UHF television broadcasting. 

As the number of television services grows, a better use of TV channels becomes 
increasingly important. TASO engineers first drew up specifications for measuring TV 
field strengths; then sifted data on field strengths of VHF and UHF. They have discovered 
reasons for hitherto unexplained deviations, and have also sought to establish a relation 
between field strength and picture quality. 

How good are directional TV transmitting antennas? The results of extensive 
field tests are analyzed. To what extent do interfering signals and noise affect picture 
quality? How accurately can one predict an interfering field? These and other questions 

are answered. 

So important are the TASO findings 
that IRE has allocated 120 pages to them. 
If you are not already an IRE member, we 
suggest you send in the coupon below to 
reserve a copy, for the June 1960 PRO- 
CEEDINGS will surely remain the defin- 
itive work on VHF and UHF TV for many 
years to come. 



BE SURE YOU READ THESE ARTICLES! 



n Allocations Problems" by E. 



, Federal Communicatioi 



. of TASO; Iowa State 
"Measurement of Television Field Strengths in the VHF and UHF Bands" 
by H. T. Head, A. D. Ring and Associates; and Ogden L. Prestholdt, CBS-TV 
"Forecasting Television Service Fields" by Alfred H. LaGrone, University 



"Influence of Trees on Televis 
quencies" by H. T. Head 
"Tropospheric Fields and their 
TASO" by Philip L. Rice, National 



Field Strengths at Ultra-High Fre- .___ _ — ____________ — _ ___ 

THE INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS 
1 East 79th Street • New York 21 , N. Y. 



"Measurement of the Subjective Effects of Interference 

Reception" by Charles E. Dean, Hazeltine Research Corp. 

"Studies of Correlation between Picture Quality and Field Strength 



the United States" by C. 



and W. L. Hughes, Iowa State 



"Relative Performance of Receiving Equipment as reported by TV Service- 
men" by Holmes W. Taylor, Burroughs Corp. 

"VHF and UHF Television Receiving Equipment" by William 0. Swinyard, 
Hazeltine Research Corp. 

I on Television Transmitting Equipment" by H. G. 

ic Co. and J. E. Young, RCA 
"Determining the Operational Patterns of Directional TV Antennas" by 
F. G. Kear, of Kear and Kennedy, and S. W. Kershner, of A. D. Ring and 
Assoc. 

"Sound-to-Picture Power Ratio" by Knox Mcllwain, Burroughs Corp. 
"Presentation of Coverage Information" by D. C. Livingston, Sylvania 
Electric Products, Inc. 



□ Enclosed is $3.00. 
\ □ Enclosed is company purchase order 
for the June, 1960 issue on Television. 
All IRE members will receive this June issue 
Extra copies to members. $1.25 each (only one to a 



do better 
with sp 

TTi^ K AT7 

AGENCYi 



NATIONAL A I 



jfj mwcA better 



AIR MEDIA BASICS INDEX 




„,!»«] TIMEBUYINC 
BASICS 



T1MEBI YING BASICS starts on page 9 

INDEX TO TIMEBUYING BASICS is on page 11 

What's in Timebuying Basics 

Advertising Expenditure Basics starts on. page 13 

Here are some easy to read graphs on : the share of national and 
local radio and television advertising expenditures versus all ad- 
vertising. Who are the top 100 advertisers in all major media 



Set Production is on page 

Radio set production through the years as veil as retail 
are shown here. The picture of popularity by type of set emplu 
sizes new improvements and contributions to the radio indusr 



In-Home Listening starts on page 41 

The in-home radio audience, analyzed from many angles, 

up this section. Interesting and informative details 

are listening by hours of the day, by seasons and territori 



Out-of-Home Listening starts on page 6! 

The bonus dimension or radio's out-of-home audience is 
rated and listed in this part. Accent is on the seasonal 
of out-of-home listening during winter and summer montl 



Cost Basics starts on page 16 

This section includes two charts helpful in eliminating the time 
consuming task of estimating costs of spot radio and tele- 
vision campaigns, based on length, day and night discounts 



FM Basics starts on page 

Fm radio's sudden popularity in the modern household i 
it necessary to provide informative data on this fast grown 
medium. Facts include market penetration, homes. produ< 



Timebuyer's Tools starts on page 20 Spending and Costs starts on page 



This handy material is designed to make a timebuyer's life 
easier. A renewal and expiration date calendar for schedules 
of various lengths and a chart showing sunset times by months 



\ aluable data covering advertiser expenditures and rates 
collected in this section for complete and quick reference. Tin 
cover network, spot, local spending plus total market revenn 



Coverage Basics starts on page 24 

The reach of radio and tv stations are easy to calculate with 
these simplified coverage charts. The charts take into account 
station power, frequency and terrain. Uhf map is also included 



Network Patterns is on page 

The difficulty to obtain research material on network rac 
recent years has been challenged with this section. It contji 
ratings, audience composition and other data on top progrjj 



Ratings Basics starts on page 28 Spot Radio's Cumulative Audience starts. page 



Timebuyers of all stages will find this rating, audience and 
share information a valuable asset in effective buying. Includes 
explanations of research terminology and cumulative audience 



Here's where facts on the rapid accumulation of the radio ai 
ence, an important audience measurement, are compiled. Cj 
figures shown include daily, weekly and monthly circulati 



m rad| ° 

LZU BASICS 

RADIO BASICS starts on page 41 

INDEX TO RADIO BASICS is on page 43 

What's in Radio Basics 

Dimensions starts on page 44 

Number, location, type of radio sets in addition to number of 

homes and radio stations are collected in this section. The con- 

.rowth of radio is accentuated with basic trend material 

2 




Jj TELEVISION 
BASICS 

TELEVISION BASICS starts on page 

INDEX TO TELEVISION BASICS is on page 

What's in Television Basics 

Dimensions starts on page 

This section consists of the basic figures in tv advertising, 
saturation, location of homes, number of sets and station 
collected and put into easy-to-follow charts, graphs and ti 

AIR MEDIA B.A: 



OTI' 



SIGMUND FREUD reversed the traditional thought of centuries by emphasizing the subconscious mental functions 
ra| motivate people to action. Here was a creative genius. Through his writings, he sold the world an entirely new concept: psycho- 
analysis. He has been called many things— now a salesman. WRIT has revised the traditional concept of radio programming. Its music, 
jtominant personalities and public services form a powerful voice that sells your products and services on every level of consciousness 
■n the big Milwaukee market. WRIT, above all, is a salesman! No wonder wonderful WRIT is first in Milwaukee. (June-July Nielsen.) 



m 



BIT MILWAUKEE 



SOLD NATIONALLY BY ROBERT E. EASTMAN & CO., INC 



THE BALABAN STATIONS 

fa tempo with the times 
JOHN F. BOX JR., Managing Director 



Sel Production i> on page 90 

The latest set production and retail sales picture together with 
trends dating back to the birth "I television reveals tv's rapid 
growth. Uso mi luded are the total numbei "I sets sold by type 

\ tewing Habits starts on page 9] 

Shown here is a comprehensive and complete rundown of the 
television audience. Some categories covering daytime and 
nighttime viewing ate: audience compo-ition: < umuKil i\ c data 

Summer \ iewing ll.il.it- starts on page 102 

The controversial subject of summer television bas merited 
separate treatment. Emphasis is put on audience decline and 
gains during earl) viewing hours. Also — studies by territory 

Spending and Costs starts on page 108 

Here are the figure- on television spending through the year* 

and how tin- advertisers divide their money among network. 
spot and local media \l-o shown are -pending by industries 

\etwork Program Trends starts on page 118 

A number of breakdowns compare audiences to the various 
show categories. Also collected are facts and figures on network 
lineups, trends on program lengths and type of sponsorship 

Color Tv starts on page 121 

A summary of color tv's status is followed by a complete listing 
ol stations equipped for color. Also a list of advertiser- with 
color h experience and a special commercial recall study 




FILM & TAPE 
BASICS 



FILM & TAPE BASICS starts on page 129 

INDEX TO FILM & TAPE BASICS is on page 131 



What's in Film & Tape Basics 



Syndication Basics starts on page 13: 



Here is an esl 
50 market-, a 
plus an alpha 



or of time and film costs and their range 
ing of what big regional buyers are us 
:al guide to -how- now active in syndics 



Tape Basics starts on pajie 13< 

Broadcasters and producers equipped for tape are listed hi 
along with taped -hows available in syndication, plus infori 
tion on mobile, color tape equipment here and around m 



Commercials Basics starts on.. 



This is a complete -et of credits for winners of the First 
ican Tv Commercial- Fe-ti\al & Forum, including bests, mil 
ners-up, and honorable mentions, in product and -peeial group 



TIMEBUYERS 
OF THE U.S. 

TIMEBUYERS OF THE U. 



...page 14 



This listing, the first part of which appears in Air MedB 
Basics, includes most of the men and women in U.S. agen^ il 
connected with the buying of national radio/tv time. A 
19 cities is included I plus a few others I where 90fc of the -p| 
business i- placed. \ir Media Ha-ic- contains the most imi 
tant part of this — buyers in New "^ ork City and Chicago, 
listing shows agencies in alphabetical order, their accounts ; 
the media executives ami timebuyers responsible for th 
account-. Material i- updated from the winter-spring 1960 e 
tion of Time Buyers Register. The material was updated fd 
three source-: (1) replies from agencies to a questions J 
sent out b> SPONSOR seeking the latest personnel informal;' 

(2) published data in sponsor's weeklj WRAP-UP seel 

(3) miscellai us sources. Rest of li-t covering the other I 

eitie- will appear in succeeding weekly i--Ue- of SPO>$| 



STAFF FOR SPONSOR'S 14TH ANNUAL AIR MEDIA BASICS 



Publisher 

Executive Vice President 

Managing Editor 

\ir Media Basics Editor 

Film Editor 

Art Editor 



Norman R. Glenn 
Bernard Piatt 
Alfred J. Jaffe 
II nl If i /'. Scanlon 
Heyward Ehrlich 
Maury Kurt: 



sponsor i- published weekly, with \ir Media Basics as Section 2 in August, bj Spont 
Entered is 2nd i lass matte! on 29 Januarj 1948 at the post office of Baltimore, Md.. under 
1879. Copyright I960, Spon-o. Publication-. Inc. 



Publications. Inc. 
he Act of 3 March 




6 



FOR 



7 .857 



pretty good batting average in anybody's league 

36 l sts outof42 
daytime quarter hours 

in April Nielsen 
Monday thru Friday, 7:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. 

. . . and May ARB confirms WJBK-TV's leadership with 

22 % greater share of audience than Detroit's 

No. 2 station from sign-on to sign-off. 



STORER station 



WJBK-TV 



DETROIT 

CHANNEL 2 CBS 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: THE KATZ AGENCY 



JCUST 1960 



WHAT'S 

BEHIND 

THIS 

REMARKABLE 

GROWTH 

STORY? 



ABC Television has been growing rapidly. Xext fall we will present our most ambitious schedule, with 
a program investment of well over $3,250,000 per week. This is an advertisers' vote of confidence in 
the accelerated progress of ABC Television. Significant indications of ABC's drive to leadership are: 



AUDIENCE GROWTH: In prime 
'time, ABC today is in a dead heat 
|»vith one network and well ahead 
bf the other in the competitive 
inarkets, according to Nielsen. In 
xational evening circulation, ABC 
las passed one network and is 
closing the gap on the other. 
:OST EFFICIENCY: ABC's cost 
Der thousand homes per commer- 
ial minute for 1959-60 was $3.15, 
compared to Network Y's S3. 37 
'ind Network Z's S3. 99, delivering 
rom 7% to 26% more homes per 
id dollar. This Nielsen data is for 
he full season, October '59 through 
April '60 . . . for the full week, 
Sunday through Saturday ... for 
.he full evening, 6 to 11 P.M. 
PUBLIC SERVICE: ABC's mean- 
ngful breakthrough in the public 
service and educational fields is 
videnced by Bell & Howell's 
ponsorship of 15 provocative, 
:ontroversial special telecasts, and 
by their co-sponsorship of the 
eekly Winston Churchill series. 
Ralston, in sponsoring Expedition. 
returns for a fourth year of regu 
iarly scheduled educational pro 
grams. Both advertisers are mak 
ing key contributions to the 
vitality of ABC's expanded efforts 
in this area. 



SPORTS LEADERSHIP: Broaden- 
ing the spectrum of its program 
appeal, ABC Television has be- 
come the Number One network in 
variety and extent of sports cover- 
age. Sportscasts will include NCAA 
football, the new r American Foot- 
ball League pro games, All-Star 
golf, major league baseball, and 
the only weekly boxing show. 
SPECIALS: Programs such as the 
Bing Crosby Specials, Peter and 
the Wolf, Maurice Chevalier's In- 
vitation to Paris, Elvis Presley and 
Frank Sinatra have enjoyed con- 
siderable success. They have, in 
fact, averaged a greater share of 
audience than any other network, 
according to the National Nielsen 
data for the 1959-1960 season. To 
maintain this leadership through 
the coming season, ABC will 
present specials featuring Bing 
Crosby, Debbie Reynolds, Victor 
Borge and John Wayne. Also sched- 
uled is a two-part presentation of 
the biblical tale, "David The Out- 
Law," produced in Israel and star- 
ring Jeff Chandler. 
EXPANDED DAYTIME: ABC 
audiences (12-4 P.M.) are up 727c 
this season over last, and are de- 
livered at television's best cost 
efficiency. On October 10, another 



davtime hour will be added, start- 
ing ABC's broadcast day at 11 
A.M. The new schedule will in- 
clude established favorites such as 
Queen For A Day, The Texan and 
an exciting new series, Road 
To Reality. 

ADVERTISER ACCEPTANCE: 
An unmistakable trend is spelled 
out in the Januarv-April gross time 
figures for 1960. ABC-TV's night- 
time billings are up 30% over the 
previous year. And ABC-TV is the 
only network with a daytime in- 
crease. 

In the dynamic TV medium, it is 
essential to look ahead. The momen- 
tum ABC has gathered has been 
translated into its program schedule. 
Embracing greater scope and depth 
than any ABC has yet offered, it in- 
corporates more power to inform and 
entertain. This lineup has been en- 
thusiastically received. There are 
onlv a few remaining availabilities, 
including some in the best vehicles. 
With the support of its advertisers, 
ABC-TV will continue to climb in 
1960-61. And all efforts— building 
audiences, developing broader base 
of programs, maintaining top cost 
efficiency— are aimed at one immedi- 
ate result: toprovidemaximum service 
to the public and to the advertiser. 



For Members of Advertising Agencies and Advertisers, this 

Slimmer project: Pulse invites all users of Pulse data, subscribers and >/o?/-subscribers 
alike, to participate in a rewarding project closing September 1. Just answer . . . 

HOW I USE PULSE DATA TO SOLVE A SPECIFIC PROBLEM." 

A letter of around 400 words will do, no thesis! And a committee of experienced judges 
will pick the 20 best answers, announce who won what Oct. 1 , as Pulse enters its 20th vear 
of service: 



Frank G. Boehm, Vice President 

Research-Promotion-Advertising 

Adam Young Companies 

Daniel Denenholz, Vice President 

Research-Promotion 

The Katz Agency. Inc. 

\V. Ward Dorrell. Vice President 



Research director, John Blair & Co., 
Blair TV, Blair Television Associates 
Robert M. Hoffman. Director 
Marketing and Research 
Television Advertising Reps. 

Lawrence Webb, Managing Director. 
Station Representatives Ass'n, Inc. 



#1 
$500 Cash Award — Uncle Sam's own engravings for your spend-it-yourself use 



$349.95 Handsome RCA Console TV, the Chadwick. 21 -inch, twin-speake 



nodel 



#3 



$275 magnificent all-transistor Zenith portable; supersensitive. 9 wave-bands 



And 17 Bulova Bantam Radios, the tiny $41.95 pocket-size, 

"jewelry-designed" gold and ebony model, only Si/ 4 x 2y 4 x 1" in handsome gift 
case. Precision-crafted. 6 transistors. 6 oz., including mercury battery. Big set-volume — 
amazing! 



"Nothing to buy— no boxtops." (. 

Pulse, 730 Filth Avenue. 



i your entry certificate and details now from 







PULSE 
RINGS 
DOOR- 
BELLS 



ULSE, Inc. 

n D 7 INTERVIEWS 
- w*i ■■ FAMILIES 

r THEIR 
HOMES 



AIR MEDIA B.A5 






HERE IS A comprehensive and 
complete guide, full of useful facts 
for the tv/radio buyer. Routine 
and sometimes complicated every- 
day buying details are interpreted 
and put into easy-to-use time sav- 
ing charts and graphs. The cov- 
erage of tv/radio signals can be 
estimated at a glance as well as 
cost of spot campaigns and expira- 
tion/renewal dates of schedules. 
Audience data together with ad- 
vertising expenditures and expla- 
nations of radio/tv research termi- 
nology contribute to making the 
agency timebuyer's life easier 




AIR MEDIA BA» 



i TIMEBUYING 

" TIMEBUYING BASICS 



INDEX 



ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE BASICS 

What percent does nat'l/local get of all advertising page 13 

The top 100 national advertisers in all major media, starts on page 14 



COST BASICS 

How to figure the cost of a spot radio campaign ; 150 markets page 16 

How to figure the cost of a spot tv campaign ; 150 markets page 18 



TIMEBUYER'S TOOLS 

Temperatures by months of year in 74 markets, for spot users page 20 

How to figure renewal and expiration dates for ad campaigns page 21 

How to know what part of the U.S. is in darkness; by hours page 22 



COVERAGE BASICS 

The reach of good quality t v signals, vhf and uhf included page 24 

How power, frequency, and terrain affects radio signals page 26 

Where uhf stations are : a map shows their locations page 2 7 



RATINGS BASICS 

The difference between a rating and share of audience page 28 

Explanations of cume audiences, duplication, cost-per- 1,000 page 30 

How to figure out accuracy of rating; statistical error table page 31 

How to know if two ratings are really different page 32 

How to understand Nielsen terminology; four examples presented., page 34 

Broad reach vs. high frequency; positioning of late nite spots page 36 

How to use group analysis research page 38 

AUGUST 1960 



r IFTY MILLION FRENCHMEN CAN'T BE WRONG 



'exas Guinan's happy shout of "Hello, Sucker" to every customer who entered her restaurant — whether the} 
enators, gangsters, or "Big Butter and Egg Men" from Iowa — endeared her to a generation. She made eve 
sel at home in the Era of Wonderful Nonsense — and she made them feel at home as her customers. The 
if Texas Guinan's salesmanship was in real entertainment and warm hospitality — the keynote of Balaba ; 
iramming in every market. WIL specializes in creating the happy mood to buy in the big St. Louis marketth 
he power of dominant personalities and positive salesmanship. WIL is a powerful voice to sell your pre 
nd services in St. Louis, because WIL is, above all, a salesman. WIL is —first in Hooper, Nielsen and ' 



WIL ST LOUIS 



WIL St. Louis 
KBOX Dallas 



THE BALABAN STAT 

in tempo win 
John F. Box, Jr., Managing^ 
Sold Nationally by Robert E 



■>^% 



ril 



1 TIMEBUYING J 

IL_-J ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE BASICS 

•These are the advertising expenditure trends since World War II 



National and local ad expenditures as a percent of disposable income 




1946 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 



National tv and radio ad expenditures as a Local tv and radio ad expenditures as a 
share of all national ad expenditures share of all local ad expenditures 




1946 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 1946 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 



The advertising estimates above were prepared by McCann-Erickson, the charts by CBS" Department of Economic Analys 
that these figures are percent and shares and not dollar figures. 



Ml 

I TIMEBUYING J ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE BASICS 
Here are the top 100 national advertisers for 1959 



Top spenders in all major media, ranked by total 







Total 


Net Tv 


Spot Tv 


Spot Radio 


Magazine 


Newspaper 


Outdoor 


1. 


P & G 


105,155,990 


50,293,552 


45,046,800 




3.566,075 


6,249,563 




2. 


Gen. Motors Corp. 


104,557,955 


20,021,744 


1,370,030 


4,115,000 


30,594,570 


38,622,558 


9,387,053 


3. 


Gen. Foods 


60,801,466 


20,890,321 


14,599,400 


705,000 


10,506,752 


13,738,272 


361,721 


i. 


Ford Motor 


59,784,731 


12,048,187 


3,438,840 


7,280,000 


11,898,223 


19,679,452 


59,784,731 


5. 


Lever Brothers 


56,766,422 


32,734,955 


14,118,940 




3,035,760 


6,876,767 




6. 


Am. Home Products 


51,065,995 


28,109,458 


10,657,620 


616,000 


6,894,898 


3,967,967 


820,052 


7. 


Colgate-Palmolive Co. 


49,168,121 


22,478,524 


13,879,890 




5,509,165 


7,300,542 




8. 


Chrysler Corp. 


46,524,351 


9,507,266 


989,090 


4,129,000 


12,509,927 


18,095,839 


46,524,351 


9. 


R. J. Reynolds 


38,593.094 


16,123,827 


4,252,450 


4,800,000 


5,224,466 


8,192,351 




10. 


Gen. Mills 


30,376,551 


12,919,237 


3,237,710 


594,000 


6,470,535 


7,064,547 


90,519 


11. 


Am. Tob. Co. 


28,650,803 


9,881.440 


3,467,440 


3,090,000 


7,380,747 


9,257,883 


1,514,353 


12. 


P. Lorillard Co. 


28,605,747 


12.825,558 


4,177,170 


3,100,000 


1,410,619 


6,779,442 


312,958 


13. 


Bri»tol-Mvers 


27,802,294 


12,616,707 


7,744,650 


1,900,000 


4,631,454 


909,483 




14. 


Gen. Elec. Co. 


27,302,331 


6,194,634 


278,590 




13,237,334 


7,591,773 




15. 


Distillers Corp.-Seagrams 


26,068,127 


503,350 






12,001,847 


11,373,763 


2,189,167 










16. 


Liggett & Myers Tob. 


25,898,892 


11,591,507 


2,948,590 


3,600,000 


4,305,759 


3,262,609 


190,427 


17. 


Philip Morris, Inc. 


22,395,275 


8,595,078 


4,387,270 


710,000 


2,834,981 


4,998,560 


869,386 


18. 


Sterling Drug 


21,694,565 


12,975,463 


3,660,910 


1,025,000 


2,015,622 


2,017,570 




19. 


Kellogg Co. 


21,646,988 


7,454,261 


5,988,600 




2,902,460 


3,927,363 


1,374,304 


20. 


Nat'l. Dairy Products 


21,586,521 


6,395,377 


1,445,980 




6,440,970 


6,545,894 


758,300 


21. 


Brown & Williamson 


21,563,878 


8,592,953 


9,252,640 




1,629,048 


2,063,356 


25,881 








22. 


Gillette Co. 


20,277,178 


13,642,174 


2,745,350 


1,059,500 


852,601 


1,977,553 




23. 


Campbell Soup Co. 


19,032,753 


4,766,675 


492,060 


1,400,000 


7,309,745 


4,906,207 


158,066 


24. 


Miles Lab*. 


18,432,408 


7,420,515 


7,830,830 


1,100,000 


444,203 


1,636,860 




25. 


Adell Chem. Co. 


18,392,234 




18,132,030 






260,204 




26. 


Wa rner-Lambert 


17,784,459 


2,362,794 


10,690,620 




2,913,681 


1,817,364 




27. 


Standard Brands 


17,579,293 


6,254,610 


4,135,040 


1,000,000 


2,325,965 


3,388,216 


475,462 


28. 


Continental Baking 


16,013,272 


776,135 


10,806,480 


1,215,000 


86,500 


2,208,705 


920,452 


29. 


Pillsbury Co. 


15,586,318 


4,222,514 


2,712,080 




3,346,367 


5,305,357 




30. 


Corn Prods. Refin. 


15,502,920 


4,521,697 


4,226,190 


800,000 


4,086,289 


1,459,015 


409,729 


31. 


Nat'l. Distillers 


15,494,682 








5,447,743 


8,069,376 


1,977,563 


32. 


Anheuser-Busch 


14,757,821 


343,427 


3,649,070 


3,683,000 


1,252,001 


1,374,218 


4,456,105 


33. 


Nat'l. Biscuit Co. 


14,237,719 


7,599,142 


2,130,880 




2,006,974 


2,500,723 




34. 


Quaker Oats Co. 


13,155,697 


2,810,056 


1,859,690 


800,000 


3,488,515 


4,060,609 


136,827 


.{.">. 


E. I. DuPont de Nemours 


13,053,443 


4,684,494 


481,250 




5,784,624 


1,806,412 










36. 


Ka-tman Kodak Co. 


12,809,339 


5,660,265 


107,470 




5,076,212 


1,965,392 










37. 


Am. Motors Corp. 


12,421,759 




1,153,770 


435,000 


2,325,556 


8,507,433 




38. 


Borden Co. 


11,902,475 


1,626,436 


2,824,470 


900,000 


1,576,159 


3,799,166 


1,176,246 


39. 


(oca-Cola Co. 


11,783,721 


375,180 


3,567,960 




4,264,663 


1,197,957 


2,377,961 


10. 


Pharmaceuticals. Inc. 


11,418,389 


10.658,987 


418,050 




16,900 


324,452 




H. 


Bevlon 


11,335,918 


4,216,914 


3,284,050 




2,706,765 


1,074,990 


53,199 


12. 


Schenlev Indus. 


11,069,364 


136,379 


28,210 




3,354,945 


7,549,830 




13. 


Shell Oil 


11,047,121 


112.185 


2,451,710 


1,500,000 


1,134,557 


2,566,606 


3.282,063 


14. 


Texaco, Inc. 


11,037,216 


6,198,830 


649,380 


1,870,000 


1,523,033 


580,640 


245,333 


!.>. 


Am. Tele. & Tele. 


10,800,110 


1,406,190 






9,165,468 


228,452 




16. 


Coodvcar lire 


10,688,210 


1.559.205 


74,980 




5,846,356 


3,207,669 




17. 


Joseph Schlitz Brew. 


10,171,781 


1.410.407 


1,850,150 


2,710,000 


1,991,886 


295,724 


1,913,614 


18. 


Vk <">tiiigliouse Elec. 


9,837,920 


5.166,205 


42,750 




2.416,706 


2,212,259 




19. 


Ralston-Purina 


9,783,045 


4.414.520 


1,808,340 


1,352,000 


708,019 


860,445 


639,721 


■>0. 


Armour & Co. 


9,714,387 


4,599,368 


1,291,160 




2,279,209 


1,544,650 











Ttising; Outdoor Adve 



AIR MEDIA BASIC 



TIMEBUYING J ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE BASICS 

[ere are the top 100 national advertisers for 1959 (Continued from preceding page) 






Total 


Net Tv 


Spot Tv 


Spot Radio 


Magaiine 


Newspaper 


Outdoor 


51. 


Carters Prods., Inc. 


9,327,964 


5,468,065 


3,474,300 




189,603 


195,996 




52. 


R.C.A. 


9,295,220 


3,841,386 


125,880 




3.579.245 


1,748,709 




53. 


S. C. Johnson & Son 


9,258,531 


7,125,705 


1,098,880 




762.449 


271,447 




54. 


Esso Standard Oil (N. J.) 


9,251,961 


839,069 


2,198,650 


1,200,000 


1,330,729 


2.175,411 


1,508,102 
1,328,300 


55. 


Studebaker-Packard 


9,190,586 


568,524 


80,210 


750,000 


2,719,774 


3,743.778 


56. 


Firestone Tire & Rub. Co. 


9,144,539 


2,108,612 




1,100,000 


3,981,572 


1,954 355 




57. 


Standard Oil (Ind.) 


9,121,958 


424,573 


1,767,900 


610,000 


169,670 


3,252,097 
2,919,317 
3,222,211 


2,897,718 
310,267 
956,630 


58. 


Swift & Co. 


8,739,826 


2,301,794 


827,170 




2,381,278 


59. 


Pepsi-Cola Co. 


8,683,356 




2,984,590 




1,519,925 


60. 


Carnation Co. 


8,479,524 


2,640,848 


584,590 




1,929,693 


2,987,661 


336,732 


61. 


Chesebrough-Ponds 


8,300,016 


2,271,639 


1,419,880 


1.670.000 


2,224,397 


714,100 




62. 


H. Walker-Gooderham, W. 


8,274,825 








4,243,150 


3,445,156 


586,519 


63. 


Scott Paper Co. 


8,182,055 


4,100,596 


1,011,750 




2,454,769 


419,165 


195,775 


64. 


Johnson & Johnson 


7,089,779 


3,001,115 


168,800 




3,773.215 


1,111,384 


35,265 


65. 


Win. Wrigley Jr. Co. 


7,794,626 




2,749,420 


500,000 


712,744 


1,444,073 


2,388,389 


66. 


Aluminum Co. of Am. 


7,593,179 


3,912,921 


625,730 




1.843,400 


1,211,128 




67. 


Nestle Co. 


7,382,299 


1,980,761 


2,581.390 


590,000 


921,132 


1,309,016 




68. 


Int'l. Latex Corp. 


7,381,340 




7.381.340 










| 69. 


Beech-Nut Life Savers 


7,163,027 


4,829,370 


636,840 




637,410 


1,049,407 




70. 


H. J. Heinz 


7,144,510 


2,847,490 


28,040 




1,425,265 


2,843,715 






Bayuk Cigars 


6,900,421 


5,962,772 


162,910 




594,270 


180,469 




72. 


Alberto-Culver 


6,675,537 


5,140,407 


1,535,130 










73. 


U. S. Steel Corp. 


6,525,651 


3,225,820 


48,660 




2,233,065 


927,458 


90,648 


74. 


Kimberly-Clark 


6,502,330 


3.291.632 






2,341,413 


814,949 


54,336 


75. 


Helene Curtis Ind's. 


6,478,843 


1,733.022 


1,787,350 




1,083,817 


1,874,654 




76. 


Eastern Air Lines 


6,041,216 




246,360 


1.500,000 




4,294,856 




77. 


Vick Chemical 


5,956,303 


1,272,741 


3,115,200 




1,155,260 


413,102 




78. 


Am. Chicle 


5,828,120 


3,331,580 


2,496,540 










79. 


Prudential Ins. 


5,793,119 


3,776,169 






103,510 


1,913,440 




80. 


Drug Res. Corp. 


5,736,269 


2,453,349 


2,742,900 




124,825 


415,195 




81. 


Socony Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 


5,538,033 


1,139,832 


572,490 




836,750 


2,850,711 


138,250 


82. 


Am. Airlines 


5,426,541 




101,670 


1.311.000 


542,891 


3,302,266 


168,714 


83. 


Texize 


5,408,460 




5,360,900 






47,560 




84. 


Florida Citrus Comm. 


5,328,066 


1,022,992 






1,852.309 


2,452,765 




85: 


Armstrong Cork Co. 


5,323,875 


2,998,265 






2,117,760 


207,850 




86. 


7 Up Co. 


5,285,488 


1,419,930 


507,770 




2,146,783 


401,971 


809,034 


87. 


J. A. Folger & Co. 


5,230,338 




3,722,440 


735,000 




532,509 


240,389 


88. 


Trans World Air. 


5,195,105 




21,500 


925,000 




3,635,011 


613,594 


89. 


Plough, Inc. 


5,143,958 




1,405,460 


1,420,000 


855,895 


1,263,772 


198.831 
704,988 


90. 


Gulf Oil Corp. 


5,112,267 


1,492,450 


823,010 


415,000 


1,198,500 


478,319 


91. 


Hunt Fds. & Indus. 


5,100,743 




52,850 




4,499,440 


548,453 


92. 


Brown Forman Distill. 


5,065,421 








2,065,686 


2,268,221 


731,514 


93. 


Sinclair Refin. & Oil 


5,030,066 


127.050 


230,060 


2,500,000 


582,521 


1,025,169 


564,266 


94. 


Sperry Rand Corp. 


5,005,524 


2,427,951 






2,031,716 


545,857 




95. 


Atlantis Sales Corp. 


4,982,013 


1,255.175 


1,403,850 




1,766,940 


556,048 




96. 


B. F. Goodrich Co. 


4,975,461 


495,160 


78,870 




2,182,857 


1,758,200 


460,374 


97 


Heublein Inc., G. F. & Bros. 


4,913,827 




1,273,310 




1,792,126 


1,716,558 


131,833 


98. 


Andrew Jergens Co. 


4,821,435 




2,923,670 




1,258,669 


639,096 




99. 


Pan American Air. 


4,733,956 




523,600 




1,694,911 


2,488,295 


27,150 


100 


Pabst Brewing 


4,714,776 




2,710,170 






694,618, 


634,988 








(|\UGUST 1960 

L 














15 



1 

k TIMEBUYING _ 

COST BASICS 

How to figure the cost of a spot radio campaign 



iililii llllllli.. !lll!l'i!l! iiih'ii'illl 



A. Cost per minute announcement for spot radio campaigns in 150 markets or less 

(Based on a weekday schedule of 12 one-minute announcements per week for 13 weeks) 

Early morning- One-time rate 

No. of markets late afternoon Daytime Evening Daytime 



1st 10 markets 


S 717.31 


S 602.68 


$ 524.68 


$ 851.00 


1st 20 markets 


1,112.26 


947.50 


864.50 


1,297.50 


1st 30 markets 


1,480.07 


1,265.63 


1,125.09 


1,725.50 


1st 40 markets 


1,725.70 


1,475.13 


1,255.09 


2,017.25 


1st 50 markets 


1,970.40 


1,689.83 


1,426.79 


2,292.25 


1st 60 markets 


2,151.70 


1,838.78 


1,548.05 


2,491.25 


1st 70 markets 


2,295.83 


1,959.11 


1,648.88 


2,661.75 


1st 80 markets 


2,443.33 


2,088.41 


1.757.58 


2,831.25 


1st 90 markets 


2,544.35 


2,178.78 


1,827.68 


2,957.45 


1st 100 markets 


2,649.91 


2,279.69 


1,922.94 


3.093.65 


1st 110 markets 


2,746.19 


2,367.36 


1,994.24 


3,211.55 


1st 120 markets 


2,839.30 


2,453.88 


2,059.01 


3,332.05 


1st 130 markets 


2,926.33 


2,535.16 


2,138.54 


3,448.30 


1st 140 markets 


3,009.58 


2,610.96 


2.181.84 


3,551.80 


1st 150 markets 


3,084.63 


2,674.46 


2,243.04 


3,649.30 



B. How to calculate spot radio costs for campaigns of various lengths 



SPOT RADIO ESTIMATING FORMULA 
■minute announcement rates — 100%=one-time daytime rate) 
COST PER ANNOUNCEMENT 





One-time rate 


Daytime 
100% 


Early morning-late afternoon 
1"% 


Evening 
85% 




12 anncts. per week 












13 weeks 


n% 


86% 




63% 




26 weeks 


70 


81 




59 




39 weeks 


69 


80 




59 


I 


52 weeks 


67 


78 




57 




24 anncts. per week 












13 weeks 


63 <7c 


757c 




53% 




26 weeks 


61 


72 




52 




39 weeks 


60 


71 




51 




52 weeks 


59 


69 




50 















The dollar figures above were put together by the Katz Agency. 
Rates, from November 1959 SRDS, are based on the use of one 
station in each market. The market list is ranked in order of the 
largest daytime weekly circulation shown by NCS No. 2. Early 
morning-late afternoon column is the average of rates between 7 & 
9 a.m. and 1 & 6 p.m. Evening refers to the rate in effect for most 
hours between 6 and 11 p.m. and daytime for between 9 & 4 p.m. 
Estimating formula show* percentage for calculating 12- and 24- 
announcemenl campaigns of various lengths compared with the 
one-time daytime rate (the right-hand column in the top chart). 



In other words the one-time daytime rate is used as an index 
100 and costs of other campaigns are shown in relation to 
Example: The top 10 markets cost $851 for 13 weeks of 12 c 
minute announcements per market. A 12-announcement wee 
campaign at night for 52 weeks would cost 57% of that or $485 (J 
These figures cover minute announcements only. Costs cover pi i| 
offered by stations except that run-of-schedule and "fixed 
pre-emptible" discounts are not counted in prime time (exr 
where they clearly apply to prime time). 



If, 



AIR MEDIA BASKl 




Double the cov 



WLBT 3 




I TIMEBUriNG J COST BASICS 

How to figure the cost of a spot tv campaign 



/\« Cost per announcement 


for spot tv 


campaigns in 150 markets 01 


less 




MARKETS 


NICHTTIME 1 

20 Sec. announce 1 

1 Time * 


DAYTIME 
1 Minute announcements 
ITime | 12 Per week | 


DAYTIME 1 

20 Second announcements 1 
1 Time | 12 Per week | 


LATE NICHT 
1 Minute announcements 
1 T,me | 12 Per week 


1st 10 Markets 


$ 8,790 


S 3,145 | 


1.723 


| 2.565 


S 1,408 


? 5.615 


S 3,698 


1st 20 Markets 


12,530 


4.410 


2.474 


3,650 


2.053 


7.530 


4.998 


1st 30 Markets 


15,200 


5,525 


3.140 


4.613 


2,607 


8.935 


5.872 


1st 40 Markets 


17,630 


6.545 


3.849 


5.492 


3,192 


10.079 


6,696 


1st 50 Markets 


19,740 


7.372 


4,345 


6,177 


3,603 


10.999 


7.255 


1st 60 Markets 


21.555 


8.112 


4.775 


6,820 


3,981 


11.795 


7,789 


1st 70 Markets 


23,305 


8,840 


5,212 


7,46? 


4.370 


12.554 


8.253 


1st 80 Markets 


24,570 


9,350 


5.522 


7,916 


4.645 


13.239 


8,648 


1st 90 Markets 


25.810 


9.900 


5.955 


8,409 


5.003 


13.802 


9,060 


1st 100 Markets 


26,763 


10,360 


6.255 


8,811 


5.267 


14.290 


9.393 


1st 110 Markets 


27,808 


10,820 


6.592 


9,224 


5,566 


14,813 


9.762 


1st 120 Markets 


28,723 


11.246 


6,871 


9.613 


5,823 


15.269 


10,124 


1st 130 Markets 


29.430 


11.576 


7.072 


9,918 


6.007 


15.622 


10.340 


1st 140 Markets 


30,260 


11,948 


7,304 


10,275 


6,229 


16.035 


10.642 


1st 150 Markets 


31.086 


12,331 


7.588 


10,617 


6.484 


16.465 


10.951 



B. 



Part of a regular survey of spot iv w 

costs by the Katz Agency, the dollar D. Formulas for estimating Spot tv budgets 

figures at top are based on one station FREQUENCY DISCOUNTS 

per market. Highest rates per market 
are used for the one-time figures along 
with the discount prices on the same 
station. Rates are per SRDS. March, 
1960. To calculate costs for more than 
one announcement, two formulas are 
shown below the dollar figures. The 
frequency discount figures are based 
on total units used within a contract 
yar, tin- weekly plan figures for units 
used within a week. Shown at bottom 
are ratios comparing daytime and late 
night announcements with nighttime 
announcements (index: 100) and com- 
paring 20- and 10-second announce- 
ment both night and day with min- 
utes (index: 100). 



13 Times 26 Times 52 Times 104 Time 


156 Times 


260 Times 


Nighttime (20 sec.) ^Tr 3 % 67- 


87c 


9'^% 


lP7c 


Davtime Oninulesl Wfo 4%% 11% 


13% 


' i 


'7% 


WEEKLY PLANS 

Average Discount from 1 -Time 
1 Week 


Rate— Daytin 
13 Weeks 


26 Weeks 


52 Weeks 


6 announcements per week 2] 1 -i r '< 




28%% 


32<fc 


12 announcements per week J 2 % 


43f C 


44%% 


47% 




\, 9 Announcement cost ratios 




Mighttime 


Daytime 


Nighttime: 100$ Minute 




100<7r 


nine 


Davtime: _ 20-se onds 




91 


8'* 


Late night: 40 10-seconds 




48 


44 



AIR MEDIA B.i 



f 

.ISGEIS, MERMAIDS AND ELEFHS.NTS P.I.BAMUM 

i.merican legend in his own lifetime, Phineas Taylor Barnum styled himself "The Prince of Humbugs". His 
i rtising copy surpassed anything in the subsequent history of publicity in intensity and selling power. Here 
i a salesman of gigantic stature, who sold the world such exotic oddities as Tom Thumb, the Fiji Mermaid 
I Jumbo. Today, their very names are imbedded in the language we speak. Barnum was a showman 
i above all, Old P.T. was a salesman! Showmanship and effective selling keynote the Balaban policy. Origi- 
f programming and dominant personalities make KBOX a powerful voice to sell your products and services 
maximum effect under the Big Top in Big D. KBOX is a showman — but above all, KBOX is a salesman! 



JSZ DALLAS 



THE BALABAN STATIONS 

In tempo with the times 
John F. Box, Jr., Managing Director 



WIL 

St. Louis 
KBOX 

Dallas 
WRIT 

Milwaukee Sold Nationally by The Katz Agency Inc. 




r ] i 

I TIMEBUYING J 

LZ-J TIMEBUYER'S TOOLS 

How do U. S. temperatures vary by months of the year 





Selling temperatures for spot tv/ radio advertisers 












Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Ave. 


Albany 


22 


23 


33 


45 


57 


67 


71 


70 


62 


51 


39 


26 


47 


Asheville-Green.-Spart. 
Amarillo __ 


39 


41 


47 


55 


63 


71 


74 


73 


68 


57 


47 


40 


56 


. 35 


40 


46 


56 


64 


74 


78 


77 


69 


59 


45 


37 


57 




45 


47 
37 


53 

45 


62 
54 


70 
65 


78 
74 


80 
78 


79 
76 


74 
70 


63 
59 


52 

48 


45 
39 


62 
57 


Baltimore 


37 


Beaumont-Port Arthur 
Birmingham 


53 


56 
48 


60 
54 


68 
62 


74 
70 


80 
77 


82 
80 


82 
79 


78 
75 


70 
64 


59 
52 


54 
46 


68 
62 


45 


Boston 


29 


29 


38 


47 


58 


67 


72 


72 


64 


55 


44 


33 


51 


Buffalo 


25 


25 


33 


44 


55 


65 


71 


69 


62 


51 


40 


29 


47 


Charleston, S. C 


51 


53 


58 


66 


73 


80 


82 


81 


78 


68 


59 


52 


67 


Charleston-Huntington, 


W. Va. ... _ 36 


38 


45 


55 


64 


72 


75 


74 


69 


57 


46 


38 


56 


Chicago — 


25 


27 


37 


48 


59 


69 


75 


73 


66 


54 


40 


28 


50 


Charlotte, N. C. 


40 


48 


51 


59 


70 


77 


80 


80 


70 


63 


50 


53 


62 


Cincinnati 


33 


35 


43 


54 


64 


73 


77 


75 


69 


57 


45 


35 


55 


Cleveland 


28 


29 


37 


47 


59 


69 


74 


72 


66 


54 


42 


31 


51 


Columbia, S. C 


48 


49 


56 


64 


72 


79 


81 


80 


76 


65 


55 


48 


64 


Columbus 


30 


31 


40 


50 


61 


71 


74 


72 


66 


54 


42 


32 


52 


Corpus Christi 


.. . 56 


59 


64 


71 


77 


81 


83 


83 


80 


74 


64 


58 


71 


Davenport 


. .. . 24 


28 


38 


51 


62 


72 


77 


75 


67 


55 


40 


28 


51 


Denver 


29 


32 


38 


48 


56 


66 


73 


71 


63 


52 


39 


32 


50 


Des Moines 


.. 22 


26 


37 


50 


61 


71 


76 


74 


66 


54 


38 


26 


50 


Detroit 


. 26 


27 


35 


46 


58 


68 


73 


71 


64 


53 


40 


29 


49 




10 


13 
50 


25 
25 
56 


38 
42 
66 


49 
55 
73 


59 
65 
81 


66 
71 
85 


65 
69 
85 


56 
59 
78 


45 
46 
68 


29 
28 
56 


15 
13 
48 


39 
41 
66 


Farg